300 episodes

Wednesday in the Word is the podcast that explains what the Bible means and how we figure it out. Unlike a traditional sermon, the focus is on learning to figure out what the Bible says. In addition to going verse by verse through the Bible, we go concept by concept focusing on what the original author intended to say in context. We also compare interpretative options and talk about how to choose between them. This podcast has no advertisements. Nor do we ask for donations. It is free to all who want to learn. More at: WednesdayintheWord.com

Wednesday in the Word with Krisan Marotta Krisan Marotta

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 4.8 • 19 Ratings

Wednesday in the Word is the podcast that explains what the Bible means and how we figure it out. Unlike a traditional sermon, the focus is on learning to figure out what the Bible says. In addition to going verse by verse through the Bible, we go concept by concept focusing on what the original author intended to say in context. We also compare interpretative options and talk about how to choose between them. This podcast has no advertisements. Nor do we ask for donations. It is free to all who want to learn. More at: WednesdayintheWord.com

    50 Matthew 9:18-26 The bleeding woman

    50 Matthew 9:18-26 The bleeding woman

    Jesus asked, "Who touched me?"  In a metaphorical way, he asks it still. You can try to touch his robe and then run away. But if you do, you're missing the greatest gift of all: salvation.







    Review







    In chapters 8-9, Matthew presents a series of miracles which establish the God-given authority of Jesus. The miracles Jesus performed prove his authority and testify to the fact that he is the Messiah. 







    Matthew 9:18-26 contains healing stories of two woman, the daughter of Jairus and the woman with bleeding.  This podcast covers the story of the woman and the next podcast will cover the daughter.







    Passage







    18While he was saying these things to them, behold, a ruler came in and knelt before him, saying, “My daughter has just died, but come and lay your hand on her, and she will live.”  19And Jesus rose and followed him, with his disciples.  20And behold, a woman who had suffered from a discharge of blood for twelve years came up behind him and touched the fringe of his garment,  21for she said to herself, “If I only touch his garment, I will be made well.”  22Jesus turned, and seeing her he said, “Take heart, daughter; your faith has made you well.” And instantly the woman was made well.  23And when Jesus came to the ruler's house and saw the flute players and the crowd making a commotion,  24he said, “Go away, for the girl is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him.  25But when the crowd had been put outside, he went in and took her by the hand, and the girl arose.  26And the report of this went through all that district. - Matthew 9:18-26







    * We learn a lot more detail from Mark 5:21-35 & Luke 8:40-56. * The woman is not only sick. She is ritually unclean and isolated from her community (Leviticus 15:25-28). * Note the laws concerning bodily emissions applied equally to men and women (Leviticus 15:1-15).* The laws concerning cleanliness were physical symbols to teach us spiritual realities.* Matthew makes it clear that Jesus’ robe had no magical powers in and of itself.  * The woman is caught "red-handed." Jesus immediately turns to face her and speak to her (Luke 8:47).* The word "well" (Mark 5:28; G4982) when the woman says 'I will be made well' and when Jesus says 'your faith has made you well' (Mark 5:34; Matthew 9:33) is used both for healing in the ordinary sense of recovering from a cold and for salvation. The context tells us which kind of "saving" is meant: physical healing or eternal salvation.* Like the others before her, the woman has wrestled with faith and come to believe that Jesus is who he says he is. * The disciples don't seem to know what's going on and they tell Jesus he doesn't either (Mark 5:31).* Jesus seeks the woman, but he doesn't force her to identify herself.* She reached out for physical healing, but Jesus offered her salvation.







    Jesus asked, "Who touched me?"  In a metaphorical way, he asks it still. You can touch his robe and then run away. You can pray, "Lord, give me this one thing and I'll never bother you again." But God has more to give you than "this one thing." God has more to offer than solving the problems of the here and now. God is offering mercy, forgiveness and salvation.











    Next: 51 Matthew 9:18-26 Jairus’s daughter







    Previous: 49 Matthew 9:14-17 Fasting and wine skins







    Series: a href="https://www.wednesdayintheword.

    • 45 min
    49 Matthew 9:14-17 Fasting, cloth & wine skins

    49 Matthew 9:14-17 Fasting, cloth & wine skins

    In these stories, Jesus challenges the religious culture and practices of the Pharisees, not the Old Testament. His understanding is so fundamentally incompatible with the Pharisees that if he tried to reform their their views, he would only destroy them.







    Review







    In chapters 8-9, Matthew presents a series of miracles which establish the God-given authority of Jesus. Starting in 9:9, Matthew turned to another challenge to the authority of Jesus: his understanding of righteousness.







    We saw the first disagreement in the last podcast.  Jesus called Matthew, a tax collector, to be one of the 12 and that sparked a debate with the Pharisees over why Jesus associated with tax collectors and sinners. In all three synoptic gospels ( Matthew, Mark & Luke), that story is followed by this story where the disciples of John question the religious behavior of Jesus.







    Fasting commanded in the Old Testament







    26And the LORD spoke to Moses, saying,  27“Now on the tenth day of this seventh month is the Day of Atonement. It shall be for you a time of holy convocation, and you shall afflict yourselves and present a food offering to the LORD.  28And you shall not do any work on that very day, for it is a Day of Atonement, to make atonement for you before the LORD your God.  29For whoever is not afflicted on that very day shall be cut off from his people.  30And whoever does any work on that very day, that person I will destroy from among his people.  31You shall not do any work. It is a statute forever throughout your generations in all your dwelling places.  32It shall be to you a Sabbath of solemn rest, and you shall afflict yourselves. On the ninth day of the month beginning at evening, from evening to evening shall you keep your Sabbath.”  - Leviticus 23:26-32







    * The Jews were commanded to fast once per year on the Day of Atonement.* Some argue that "afflict yourselves (Strongs H6031a; Lev 23:27) refers only to inward humility. If they are right, then there are no commanded fasts in the Old Testament.* However the context suggests this is an outward action (Lev 23:29-30); Isaiah 58:5 uses this phrase fast and this phrase in parallel; and historically, the Jews understood this to mean fasting. Note Luke describes the Day of Atonement as "the Fast" (Acts 27:9).* On the Day of Atonement, physical hunger was to strengthen the reminder of our need for God's mercy.







    Fasting observed in the Old Testament







    While we have only 1 command for a religious fast, there are many stories in the OT that include fasting.  In these stories an individual or group decides to fast in response to a specific situation.







    In the Old Testament we see fasting as part of:







    * individual repentance (2Samuel 12:13-23)* community repentance (1Samuel 73-6)* grief and mourning (2Samuel 1:12)* calling on God for deliverance (Esther 4:3; Esther 4:15-16)* seeking guidance from God (Nehemiah 1:1-4)







    Fasting acquires significance and meaning when practiced by a believing heart in conjunction with humility and repentance before God. Without such a heart the practice is empty (Isaiah 58:1-9).







    From the OT then, there was one ritual of fasting commanded on the Day of Atonement.  It was meant to create a physical reminder of their humility and dependence on God and need for His mercy.







    Fasting was also voluntarily practiced by individuals and the community in associating with repentance, prayer, mourning and seeking God.

    • 52 min
    48 Matthew 9:9-13 Eating with sinners

    48 Matthew 9:9-13 Eating with sinners

    Jesus ate with the tax collectors with the message, repent for the kingdom of God is at hand, and that is a message we do well to share. The most loving thing we can do is to help people deal with their real problem. 







    Review







    In chapters 8-9, Matthew presents a series of miracles which point to the God-given authority of Jesus. Matthew now turns to another challenge to the authority of Jesus: his understanding of righteousness.







    Jesus had a fundamental disagreement with the Pharisees. The Pharisees defined righteousness as keeping themselves religiously pure, including avoiding the religiously impure "sinners."  Jesus defines righteousness as seeking to follow God’s example and treating "sinners" with acts of steadfast merciful compassion. 







    Passage







    9As Jesus passed on from there, he saw a man called Matthew sitting at the tax booth, and he said to him, “Follow me.” And he rose and followed him.  10And as Jesus reclined at table in the house, behold, many tax collectors and sinners came and were reclining with Jesus and his disciples.  11And when the Pharisees saw this, they said to his disciples, “Why does your teacher eat with tax collectors and sinners?”  12But when he heard it, he said, “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick.  13Go and learn what this means: ‘I desire mercy, and not sacrifice.’ For I came not to call the righteous, but sinners.”  - Matthew 9:9-13







    * Who was Matthew* Matthew (aka Levi) was a tax collector before becoming one of the 12.* Only the most desperate Jews would become tax collectors, as they were hated by their fellow countrymen and were considered ritually unclean through their association with Gentiles.* Since both lived in Capernaum, most likely Matthew and Jesus knew each other before Jesus chose him to join the 12.* Matthew was a surprising choice, because respectable people despised and avoided tax collectors.  * "Sinners" in this context refers to Jews who did not keep the law as required by the Pharisees. Compare with Luke 18:10-11.* The Pharisees thinking: If we reject God's requirements, God will exile us again. Our religious obligation is to refrain from sin and refrain from associating with sinners. Our devotion to obedience requires us to show our disapproval of those who don’t keep the law as well as we do.* In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus explained a different perspective: Sinners are not religiously unclean objects that I must avoid.  Sinners are people just like me and I am required to love them.* When your message is repent and believe, those who know they need to repent (sinners) need to hear it.* Jesus quotes Hosea 6:6. God’s merciful actions toward us are a model for our actions toward other people.* What is hesed?











    Next: 49 Matthew 9:14-17 Fasting and wine skins







    Previous: 47 Matthew 9:1-8 Jesus heals the paralytic







    Series: Gospel of Matthew 8-13 Behold the King, Part 2







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    • 46 min
    47 Matthew 9:1-8 Jesus heals the Paralytic

    47 Matthew 9:1-8 Jesus heals the Paralytic

    Jesus demonstrates that he has authority from God to forgive sins by calling upon the power of God to heal the paralytic. In addition to the faith of the paralytic, the miracles support our faith by demonstrating that God has given Jesus authority.







    Review







    In chapters 8-9, Matthew presents a series of miracles which establish the God-given authority of Jesus. We see faith before the miracle happens in the person seeking Jesus. After the miracle, others are called to recognize the authority of Jesus and respond with faith. In the healing of the paralytic, we see both these themes of faith: the faith of the person healed and the evidentiary power of the the miracle.







    Passage







    1And getting into a boat he crossed over and came to his own city.  2And behold, some people brought to him a paralytic, lying on a bed. And when Jesus saw their faith, he said to the paralytic, “Take heart, my son; your sins are forgiven.”  3And behold, some of the scribes said to themselves, “This man is blaspheming.”  4But Jesus, knowing their thoughts, said, “Why do you think evil in your hearts?  5For which is easier, to say, ‘Your sins are forgiven,’ or to say, ‘Rise and walk’?  6But that you may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins”—he then said to the paralytic—“Rise, pick up your bed and go home.”  7And he rose and went home.  8When the crowds saw it, they were afraid, and they glorified God, who had given such authority to men.  - Matthew 9:1-8







    * Matthew omits many details we find in Mark 2:1-12 and Luke 5:17-26.* Mark and Luke place this event earlier in the ministry of Jesus. Matthew is more concerned with the themes he's developing than in putting events in chronological order.* Capernaum is Jesus' home during the early part of his ministry.* Scribes were Pharisees who specialized in teaching the law.* Mark tells us the men broke a hole in the roof to bring the paralytic to Jesus.* Why is this such an emergency that they can't wait for Jesus to finish teaching? The crisis was not physical (paralysis doesn't change); the crisis was spiritual.* Jesus reacts to the faith of the paralyzed man and his friends, not the hole in his roof.* Even if this man came primarily for physical healing, Jesus speaks to the really important issue first: his faith.* The scribes knew how forgiveness is gained. It required a sacrifice in the temple by a priest and obedience to the law. It could not be gained without a word or action in the home of a carpenter from Galilee. The scribes knew how, when and under what circumstances forgiveness would be meted out and this is not it!* Their charge of blasphemy is orthodox; only God can forgive sins. Jesus couldn’t have the authority to forgive sins because he’s not forgiving sins the way the scribes know God forgives them* Jesus responds: I have the authority to forgive your sins, and I have the authority to call upon the power of God to heal your physical body so that you can get up and walk. But one describes an invisible reality.* Jesus’s question is one of logic: "If I can do the more difficult, external, visible reality, isn't it likely that I can also do the invisible reality?"* "Son of Man" was a popular title applied by the 1st century Jews to Israel's Messiah.* Yet he acts with the authority of God to bring healing and forgiveness, demonstrating he also has the authority of God to forgive sins.











    Next: a href="https://www.wednesdayintheword.

    • 43 min
    46 Matthew 8:28-34 Demons & Pigs

    46 Matthew 8:28-34 Demons & Pigs

    When Jesus heals the demoniacs, we learn Jesus has God-given authority over the powers of darkness and evil.  In the last podcast, we saw that Jesus has God-given authority over the power of nature.  Together they build the case that Jesus is the Messiah.







    Review







    When Jesus heals miraculously, several things happen at once:







    * An individual exercises faith in Jesus by seeking him for healing before the miracle.* The miracle testifies that God has given Jesus His authority.* The miracle confronts watchers and listeners with the need to respond in faith.* The miracle is a specific act of mercy and compassion for an individual.* The miracle symbolically reminds us why Jesus, the Messiah, came.







    In the previous story, the disciples faced threatening external circumstances. The issue today concerns terrifying internal conditions as Jesus heals two men possessed by demons.







    Passage







    28And when he came to the other side, to the country of the Gadarenes, two demon-possessed men met him, coming out of the tombs, so fierce that no one could pass that way.  29And behold, they cried out, “What have you to do with us, O Son of God? Have you come here to torment us before the time?”  30Now a herd of many pigs was feeding at some distance from them.  31And the demons begged him, saying, “If you cast us out, send us away into the herd of pigs.”  32And he said to them, “Go.” So they came out and went into the pigs, and behold, the whole herd rushed down the steep bank into the sea and drowned in the waters.  33The herdsmen fled, and going into the city they told everything, especially what had happened to the demon-possessed men.  34And behold, all the city came out to meet Jesus, and when they saw him, they begged him to leave their region. - Matthew 8:28-34







    * This event appears to take place the next morning after the Jesus calms the storm (Mark 5:1-20; Luke 8:26-39).* Mark 5 & Luke 8 say there was one demon-possessed man. Matthew says there were two men. When authors pick and choose which details to include, they are not lying or making things up. They choose what to include to make their point.* Ultimately, it doesn’t matter how many men were involved, so much as it matters what kind of book we think the Bible is.* If Matthew is right (and I think he is), Mark and Luke were not wrong. They are just not as precise. Matthew was an eye-witness. Mark and Luke wrote their accounts after interviewing eye-witnesses.* Demons exists despite our modern denials. God has limited their power and influence since Pentecost.* The demons face Jesus with the certain knowledge that they stand condemned.* The demons make visible on the outside the destructive power of sin that all of us have inside.* "Legion" presents a picture of an enemy too numerous to count. This new enemy also falls under the authority of Jesus.* Healing the men made clear that they were free from their inward evil.  Drowning the pigs made it clear this place was no longer inhabited by demons.* When he calmed the storm, we saw that Jesus has God-given authority over the power of nature.  This story tells us Jesus has God-given authority over the powers of darkness and evil.  Together they build the case that Jesus is the deliverer sent from God.











    Next: 47 Matthew 9:1-8 Jesus heals the paralytic







    Previous: 45 Matthew 8:23-27 Jesus calms the storm

    • 31 min
    45 Matthew 8:23-27 Jesus calms the storm

    45 Matthew 8:23-27 Jesus calms the storm

    When he calms the storm, we learn Jesus brings the power of God to rescue His people from the vast destructive forces of nature. The miracles of Jesus have a message: Jesus brings the mercy of God for healing and deliverance.







    Review







    When Jesus heals miraculously, several things happen at once:







    * An individual exercises faith in Jesus by seeking him for healing before the miracle.* The miracle testifies that God has given Jesus His authority.* The miracle confronts watchers and listeners with the need to respond in faith.* The miracle is a specific act of mercy and compassion for an individual.* The miracle symbolically reminds us why Jesus, the Messiah, came.







    We now see his authority over nature.







    Passage







    23And when he got into the boat, his disciples followed him.  24And behold, there arose a great storm on the sea, so that the boat was being swamped by the waves; but he was asleep.  25And they went and woke him, saying, “Save us, Lord; we are perishing.”  26And he said to them, “Why are you afraid, O you of little faith?” Then he rose and rebuked the winds and the sea, and there was a great calm.  27And the men marveled, saying, “What sort of man is this, that even winds and sea obey him?”  - Matthew 8:23-27







    This event follows a long day of public teaching. Jesus is exhausted, which highlights his humanity. Jesus leave a predominately Jewish region and cross the Sea of Galilee to a predominately gentile region (Mark 4:25-41).







    The Sea of Galilee is infamous for sudden storms that seem to come out of nowhere. This storm is a serious situation, but not a hurricane (Jesus can sleep through it). Additionally, several of the disciples are experienced fisherman who would be used to these storms.







    Why did the disciples panic? Perhaps they fear Jesus no longer loves them as he seems unresponsive to their plight. Or they fear Jesus is not the Messiah he claims to be, as he is about to perish with them.







    Jesus uses this phrase "o you of little faith" in situations where his disciples have lost sight of who God is and who he (Jesus) is (Matthew 6:30 / Luke 12:28; Matthew 14:31; Matthew 16:8; Matthew 17:20). Contrast the faith of the centurion with the disciples in the boat.







    When Jesus calms the storm, he physically, visually reminds them that the authority of God is with him. Only God can control the forces of nature and He has given that authority to Jesus. Compare with Psalm 107:23-32.







    When Ray Stedman preached on this text, he used one sentence to summarize what is being taught here: "The boat won't sink, and the storm won't last forever." The gospel won't let you down and the end of the storm is joy and glory.











    Next: 46 Matthew 8:28-34 Jesus casts out demons







    Previous: 44 Matthew 8:18-22 Foxes & Funerals







    Series: Gospel of Matthew 8-13 Behold the King, Part 2

    • 30 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
19 Ratings

19 Ratings

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How to do Bible Study

Krisan not only illuminates her Bible studies, but she helps listeners learn how to do this for themselves. I'm going to commit to learning how to learn more from the Bible this year!

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Sound, Gospel-centered teaching

Wednesday in the Word is an excellent source of solid Biblical teaching. I appreciate how each lesson is clear, challenging, and opens my eyes every time to grow in a better understanding of what Jesus Christ has done for me.

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