171 episodes

It's been said that people don't want to know: 1) how sausages are made, 2) how bibles are translated. In this podcast we bravely talk about the latter, go deep into biblical studies, and seek to treasure and understand the Bible together. It's for people who want to get nerdy about Scripture and for those who want to understand how their translations came to be. Everything from history to Hebrew, we're on a quest to learn more and make beautiful translations of God's Word. We believe the Bible is a unified, God-breathed, God-centered, hope-giving book, sweeter than honey, pointing to Jesus.

Working for the Word - a Bible translation podcast Andrew Case

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 4.8 • 50 Ratings

It's been said that people don't want to know: 1) how sausages are made, 2) how bibles are translated. In this podcast we bravely talk about the latter, go deep into biblical studies, and seek to treasure and understand the Bible together. It's for people who want to get nerdy about Scripture and for those who want to understand how their translations came to be. Everything from history to Hebrew, we're on a quest to learn more and make beautiful translations of God's Word. We believe the Bible is a unified, God-breathed, God-centered, hope-giving book, sweeter than honey, pointing to Jesus.

    The First Eclectic Edition of the Hebrew Psalms - with Drew Longacre

    The First Eclectic Edition of the Hebrew Psalms - with Drew Longacre

    In this episode we have the pleasure of talking to biblical scholar Dr. Drew Longacre. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Birmingham and has recently been a researcher at Cambridge Digital Bible Research on the Psalms: Layer by Layer project, which we did an episode on in the past. From 2016–2021, he was the postdoctoral researcher on the a project called “The Hands that Wrote the Bible: Digital Palaeography and Scribal Culture of the Dead Sea Scrolls”, where he applied the latest advances in radiocarbon dating and digital paleography to the study of the Dead Sea Psalm scrolls. Longacre and Brent Strawn from Duke Divinity School have received an NEH Scholarly Editions grant to complete an eclectic critical edition of Psalms 1–50 for the Hebrew Bible: a Critical Edition series from 2024–2026. A little about this critical edition of the Hebrew Psalter: the project aims to provide the world with the first truly critical edition of the Book of Psalms. It plans to use the full range of the Dead Sea Scrolls, incorporate important Greek papyri, and take advantage of recent methodological advances in textual criticism.

    The project website.


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    • 50 min
    Translation News - Video Bible Dictionary, FOBAI Update, & More

    Translation News - Video Bible Dictionary, FOBAI Update, & More

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    tips.translation.bible

    Video Bible Dictionary


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    • 7 min
    Bitcoin & Bible Translation?

    Bitcoin & Bible Translation?

    Bitcoin represents a transformative tool for missionaries, offering a secure, transparent, and ethical alternative to traditional financial systems. By embracing Bitcoin, missionaries can protect themselves and those they serve from economic instability and corruption. Moreover, Bitcoin’s alignment with biblical principles of fairness and justice makes it a fitting choice for those committed to upholding these values in their work.



    This single episode is not meant to convince you to invest in Bitcoin, but rather to encourage you to explore it with an open mind, especially from a biblical point of view. For that, I've compiled a curated doc of recommendations for those who are interested in learning more.

    Read the doc.



    The anecdotes about Wences at the beginning are from Digital Gold.


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    • 24 min
    P.S. on the Divine Name - some last thoughts and loose ends

    P.S. on the Divine Name - some last thoughts and loose ends

    Am I dogmatic about using "Yahweh" as opposed to other pronunciations? What about Yehovah? How do we end up with the pronunciation of "Yahweh" anyway? Doesn't the Septuagint provide conclusive evidence for how to pronounce the divine name? These are some closing thoughts and loose ends I wanted to address.

    ⁠⁠Read the book⁠⁠⁠⁠.



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    • 10 min
    How Was the Divine Name Translated in the Reformation? - Part 4

    How Was the Divine Name Translated in the Reformation? - Part 4

    The previous episodes in this series considered God’s desire for us to use his name, how the pronunciation was lost, and how the New Testament writers handled the matter. It remains, finally, to consider how it has been handled by translators since the Reformation. In that time there have been various departures from Jerome’s Latin Vulgate, which rendered the divine name as Dominus (“Lord/Master”), while others have maintained the tradition, which goes back to the Septuagint.


    Read the article⁠⁠.

    ⁠⁠Read the book⁠⁠⁠.

    Read about Sacred Name Translations.



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    • 8 min
    Why Didn’t the New Testament Authors Use God’s Name? - Part 3

    Why Didn’t the New Testament Authors Use God’s Name? - Part 3

    We know that the inhibition for pronouncing God’s name came before Christianity, although we don’t know how widespread it was. It’s possible that rendering the divine name as “Lord” (kurios) had already been a strong tradition for centuries by the time we get to Jesus and the apostles. What’s clear is that the New Testament manuscripts we have all follow the tradition that the Septuagint set, which was to substitute the title “Lord” (kurios) for God’s name (YHWH). So, the fact that the New Testament never uses God’s personal name as revealed in the Old Testament, or even an approximation of it, is crucial.

    Why did the New Testament authors choose to do this? Was it because they thought God’s name was too sacred to write out in Greek transliteration and feared that God might strike them down if they did so? Or, had its pronunciation already been forgotten to history? Were they afraid that the Jews might be angry about it? Or, was it some other reason(s)? The writers never tell us why, so everything that follows here is speculation. Nevertheless, it’s an honest attempt to grapple with the issue.

    Read the article⁠.

    ⁠Read the book⁠⁠.



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    • 10 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
50 Ratings

50 Ratings

Karisofia ,

Fantastic on two fronts

If you love the Bible, you should listen to at least a few episodes. Your appreciation for the Word will increase and you will find a greater understanding of it by looking at texts from different angles.

If you love language, you will gain so much from these discussions. The variety of languages discussed, the interest in history and social contexts, and the passion for real communication (the whole point of language!) of original ideas is unsurpassed.

If you happen to be a Bible-believing, language geek like I am, your household cleaning jobs just became a lot more fun.

Lrome04 ,

So helpful!

This is a great podcast on the extremely important (and often overlooked) great commission task of Bible translation. It also offers a lot of helpful material relating to exegesis and the Biblical languages. I don’t agree with Andrew on everything, but I do share his love for God’s Word and his desire for all of God’s people to have it in their own language.

dougsmith1977 ,

Helpful for Anyone Who Cares about Biblical Languages and Bible Translation

Andrew’s podcast fills a much-needed niche. While focused on Bible translation, his content varies in a delightful and helpful way. Some episodes show the painstaking research and transparent wrestling to make good decisions for issues that arise in translation consulting. Others involve interviews or portion of audio recordings of experts to tackle specific topics germane to working in the biblical languages. Andrew does a great job “breaking it down” into chunks to walk the hearer step-by-step through the content, and I always walk away having learned something about the beauty of God’s Word and the need to make it available to others.

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