20 episodes

Writer's Voice features author interviews and readings, as well as news, commentary and tips related to writing and publishing. We also talk with editors, agents, publicists and others about issues of interest to writers. Francesca Rheannon is producer and host of Writer's Voice. She is a writer, an independent radio producer and a broadcast journalist.

Writer's Voice with Francesca Rheannon Francesca Rheannon

    • Arts
    • 4.4 • 14 Ratings

Writer's Voice features author interviews and readings, as well as news, commentary and tips related to writing and publishing. We also talk with editors, agents, publicists and others about issues of interest to writers. Francesca Rheannon is producer and host of Writer's Voice. She is a writer, an independent radio producer and a broadcast journalist.

    Kathryn Miles, TRAILED & SUPERSTORM

    Kathryn Miles, TRAILED & SUPERSTORM

    How safe are our national parks, especially for women hikers?

    Not safe enough, says Kathryn Miles. We talk with her about her book Trailed: One Woman’s Quest to Solve the Shenandoah Murders. It’s about the murders of two remarkable women in 1996, a botched investigation and the failure by the National Park Service to take the safety of women hikers seriously.

    Then, as 2022 is slated to experience a severe hurricane season, we revisit our 2015 conversation with Kathryn Miles about her book about Hurricane Sandy, Superstorm.

    Writer’s Voice — in depth conversation with writers of all genres, on the air since 2004.

    Rate us on your favorite podcast app! It really helps others find our show. And like us on Facebook at Writers Voice Radio or find us on Twitter @WritersVoice.



    Trailed

    In May 1996, two skilled backcountry leaders, Lollie Winans and Julie Williams, entered Virginia’s Shenandoah National Park for a week-long backcountry camping trip. After the pair didn’t return home as planned, park rangers found their tent slashed open, their beloved dog missing, and both women dead in their sleeping bags.

    When journalist and author Kathryn Miles began looking into the case, she found conflicting evidence, mismatched timelines, and details that didn’t add up.

    An innocent man, Miles is convinced, has been under suspicion for decades, while the true culprit is a known serial killer Miles says authorities should investigate.

    But Trailed is more than a gripping true crime story. It’s a plea to make wilderness a safer space for women and to change the cultural narratives that put them at risk.

    Kathryn Miles is the author of, among other books, Quakeland and Superstorm.

    Superstorm

    Scientists say that climate change is driving the giant storms that are ever more frequently battering the East and Gulf Coasts of the US.

    It’s been ten years since one of them hit: Superstorm Sandy. It was the deadliest, most destructive, and strongest hurricane of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season.

    Kathryn Miles wrote the first complete account of what happened during the nine days of Sandy’s life, Superstorm. I spoke with her about the book in 2015.

    • 57 min
    Jackie Higgins, SENTIENT & Carl Safina, BECOMING WILD

    Jackie Higgins, SENTIENT & Carl Safina, BECOMING WILD

    We talk with Jackie Higgins about her book, Sentient: How Animals Illuminate the Wonder of Our Human Senses.

    Then we air our 2020 interview with Carl Safina about his book, Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace.

    Writer’s Voice — in depth conversation with writers of all genres, on the air since 2004.

    Rate us on your favorite podcast app! It really helps others find our show. And like us on Facebook at Writers Voice Radio or find us on Twitter @WritersVoice.



    Jackie Higgins

    On June 14, New York’s Supreme Court declared that an elephant is not a person.

    Happy the elephant, the Guardian reported, will not be released from the Bronx zoo to a more spacious sanctuary through a habeas corpus proceeding, which is a way for people to challenge illegal confinement. The court said “granting legal personhood in a case like this would affect how humans interact with animals, according to the majority decision.”

    Indeed. What they really mean, is that it would call into question our use of animals as objects to exploit.

    Anyone who has seen how elephants mourn understands that elephants are persons. Moreover, we humans are animals, a fact so obvious that only willful ignorance can deny it.

    So changing how we interact with animals might be a good thing, not only to save and protect other animals, but also to preserve the biosphere on which we depend.

    This is very much the perspective that informs Jackie Higgins book, Sentient.

    Higgins shows the evolutionary links between our own senses and those of animals—senses that encompass not only the five we are so familiar with, but up to seventeen more senses.

    Sentient explores the scientific revolution stirring in the field of perception, showing that the extraordinary sensory powers of our animal friends can help us better understand the same powers that lie dormant within us.

    Carl Safina

    Go here for information about our 2020 interview with Safina about Becoming Wild.

     

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Rebecca Wragg Sykes, Kindred

    Rebecca Wragg Sykes, Kindred

    We talk with Rebecca Wragg Sykes about her bestselling book, Kindred: Neanderthal Life, Love, Death and Art. Her book sheds new light on the complex culture of our Neanderthal ancestors.

    Writers Voice— in depth conversation with writers of all genres, on the air since 2004.

    Like us on Facebook at Writers Voice with Francesca Rheannon, on Instagram @WritersVoicePodcast or find us on twitter @WritersVoice.

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    Rebecca Wragg Sykes

    Many have long been fascinated by Neanderthals, even before we discovered that many people contain Neanderthal DNA. Who was this hominem who seems so far from us, yet somehow near—as if the DNA many of us carry of this vanished species is signaling to our unconscious that we are kin?

    In her bestselling book Kindred—now out in paperback—Neanderthal expert Rebecca Wragg Sykes shoves aside the cliché of the shivering ragged figure in an icy wasteland, and reveals the Neanderthal you don’t know, our ancestor who lived across vast and diverse tracts of Eurasia and survived through hundreds of thousands of years of massive climate change.

    Her book sheds new light on where they lived, what they ate, and the increasingly complex Neanderthal culture that researchers have discovered.

    Rebecca Wragg Sykes is an archaeologist and Honorary Fellow in the School of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology at the University of Liverpool. Kindred won the 2021 PEN Hessell-Tiltman prize for history and was awarded Book of the Year by Current Archaeology, among other honors. She is the creator of the blog The Rocks Remain.

    • 58 min
    Antonio Scurati, M & Tsering Yangzom Lama, WE MEASURE THE EARTH WITH OUR BODIES

    Antonio Scurati, M & Tsering Yangzom Lama, WE MEASURE THE EARTH WITH OUR BODIES

    We talk with Antonio Scurati about his international bestseller about Mussolini, M: Son of the Century. It won the prestigious Strega Prize.

    Then Tsering Yangzom Lama tells us about her powerful novel of Tibetan exile and resilience, We Measure The Earth With Our Bodies.

    Writers Voice— in depth conversation with writers of all genres, on the air since 2004.

    Like us on Facebook at Writers Voice with Francesca Rheannon, on Instagram @WritersVoicePodcast or find us on twitter @WritersVoice.

    Love Writer’s Voice? Please rate us on your podcast app. It really helps to get the word out about our show.

    Antonio Scurati

    Benito Mussolini came to power in circumstances that are resonant with the crises we face today: economic turmoil for the masses, disenchantment with elites that fail to govern, and the erosion of democracy.

    In his international bestseller, M, Antonio Scurati takes a deep dive into the mind of the dictator and the social conditions he was able to exploit in his rise.

    By combining fiction with documentary evidence and meticulous historical research, Scurati has invented a new genre, which he calls the “documentary novel.”

    M is a cautionary tale that we would all do well to heed.

    Read An Excerpt From M

    Tsering Yangzom Lama

    In today’s world, thirty people become refugees every minute and 68 million people have been displaced (almost certainly an undercount.)

    One of the earliest post WWII refugee crises happened in 1959, when Mao’s People’s Liberation Army invaded Tibet. About 80,000 Tibetans, including the Dalai Lama, were forced to escape to India and Nepal, uprooted from their ancestral villages and way of life. Many people died during that exodus.

    Tsering Yangzom Lama’s parents were among those who fled. She was born in Nepal. Yet there was much about her family’s history that she was unaware of growing up.

    Her acclaimed debut novel We Measure the Earth with Our Bodies tells the story of the Tibetan diaspora. But it also brings alive the rich history, traditions and culture of Tibet.

    Named a most anticipated book of the year by The Millions and Ms. and among the

    Washington Post’s 10 Noteworthy Books for May, 2022, We Measure the Earth with Our Bodies is a story of courage, survival resilience by an extraordinary young writer.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Philip Dray, A LYNCHING AT PORT JERVIS & Natalie Haynes, PANDORA’S JAR

    Philip Dray, A LYNCHING AT PORT JERVIS & Natalie Haynes, PANDORA’S JAR

    This week on Writer’s Voice, we talk with historian Philip Dray about his book, A Lynching at Port Jervis: Race and Reckoning in the Gilded Age. It’s about how the nation was shocked when a local Black man was lynched in 1892 in the supposedly enlightened North. Despite the shock, no one was held to account.

    Then, classics scholar Natalie Haynes tells us about her feminist interpretation of the ancient Greek myths and plays. Her book is Pandora’s Jar: Women In The Greek Myths.

    Writers Voice— in depth conversation with writers of all genres, on the air since 2004.

    Like us on Facebook at Writers Voice with Francesca Rheannon, on Instagram @WritersVoicePodcast or find us on twitter @WritersVoice.

    Love Writer’s Voice? Please rate us on your podcast app. It really helps to get the word out about our show.



    Philip Dray

    Today, it’s a terrible truth that the assault on the lives of Black Americans is neither a regional nor a temporary feature, but a national crisis. Just last week, a self-described fascist and white supremacist murdered 10 Black shoppers in Buffalo, New York.

    130 years ago, a mob in Port Jervis, New York lynched a local Black man when he was accused, like so many lynching victims, of sexually assaulting a white woman. A charge that was never proved.

    That lynching shocked New Yorkers—they thought their state was too enlightened to lynch a Black man. But no one was held to account for the murder.

    In A Lynching At Port Jervis, Philip Dray revisits that time and place, and draws lessons that are as relevant to us today as they were more than a century ago.

    READ AN EXCERPT

    Philip Dray is the author of several books of American cultural and political history, including At the Hands of Persons Unknown: The Lynching of Black America, which won the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award and was a Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, There is Power in a Union: The Epic Story of Labor in America, and Capitol Men: The Story of Reconstruction Through the Lives of the First Black Congressmen.

    Natalie Haynes

    We all learned that Pandora was the woman who unleashed all the evils into the world. (Evil woman, that tired old trope.) But what if the original story was different? What if it was much more benign? And why did the story change so much over the centuries?

    Natalie Haynes has written an entertaining and meticulously researched book that argues women in the Greek myths were much more complex, interesting and powerful human beings than later men gave them credit for. Her book is Pandora’s Jar: Women In The Greek Myths.

    Natalie Haynes is the author of six books, including the bestselling A Thousand Ships, which was shortlisted for the 2020 Women’s Prize for Fiction. She is the host of the BBC program, Natalie Haynes Stands Up for the Classics. Haynes has written for the Times, the Independent, the Guardian and the Observer.

    • 1 hr 6 min
    Mark Vonnegut, THE HEART OF CARING & Oliver Milman on Biden’s Carbon Bomb

    Mark Vonnegut, THE HEART OF CARING & Oliver Milman on Biden’s Carbon Bomb

    We talk with Mark Vonnegut about his memoir, THE HEART OF CARING: A Life In Pediatrics.

    Then, environmental reporter Oliver Milman tells us about the shocking carbon bomb that President Biden is detonating with his record-breaking sales of oil and gas leases. Milman co-wrote a recent piece in the Guardian, “Us Fracking Boom Could Tip World To Edge Of Climate Disaster.”

    And we hear a poem by Mary Oliver, “At The River Clarion.”

    Writers Voice— in depth conversation with writers of all genres, on the air since 2004.

    Like us on Facebook at Writers Voice with Francesca Rheannon, on Instagram @WritersVoicePodcast or find us on twitter @WritersVoice.

    Love Writer’s Voice? Please rate us on your podcast app. It really helps to get the word out about our show.



    Mark Vonnegut

    Can you believe there was a time when doctor’s visits were $10 to $20, people paid in cash and, if there was insurance, there were no co-payments and deductibles, or medical debt, because insurance companies didn’t go after patients for not paying their bills?

    Sounds improbable these days, but that’s the way it was when my guest Mark Vonnegut—and yes, he is the son of the famous writer—started his practice as a pediatrician.

    His new memoir, The Heart of Caring: A Life In Pediatrics, recounts what happened when the medical system started serving insurance company profits instead of patient health. It’s a story we all know well, at least our own versions of it.

    But Vonnegut tells it through the lens of a practicing doctor who has seen the toll it has taken not only on patients but on doctors as well.

    Physicians are leaving their profession in droves, beset by burnout, the moral hazard of compromising care to conform to insurance company demands, and the loss of control over their own practice of medicine.

    The Heart of Caring is filled with stories that reveal Vonnegut’s commitment to his patients–like Anna Maria, a little girl with an incurable case of bone cancer; and Marlowe, whose life-threatening anemia is cured by his just-born baby brother. Vonnegut reminds us what it means to be a good doctor and why we should care about what happens to good docs like him.

    Mark Vonnegut is the author of several previous memoirs, including Just Like Someone Without Mental Illness, Only More So, which recounts his battle with bipolar disorder. Mark Vonnegut practices pediatrics in Quincy, MA.

    Oliver Milman

    When Joe Biden ran for president, he promised to tackle the climate emergency—he called it existential—that threatens our survival. It gave me hope that finally something might be done to avert the climate apocalypse.

    There must be a special place in Hell for politicians who talk the talk on climate but turn around and do the direct opposite. Joe Biden is headed for that Hell.

    Unfortunately, he’s bringing the rest of us with him. He just sold a record number of leases to oil and gas companies to drill baby drill on our public lands. As Oliver Milman reports in his recent piece in the Guardian, co-written with Nina Lakhani,

    • 58 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
14 Ratings

14 Ratings

abt41253 ,

10 best titles

This episode is so interesting! I now have 10 new (to me) books to read. The host gets right to the point and elicits such fascinating responses from the authors. I'm a fan.

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SPECTACULAR

Francesca Rheannon has an amazing show and often has me wondering why she hasn't become the next Katie Couric or Barbara Walters with her impressive array of questions, continuing the conversation while keeping us the audience entranced and enticed and always wanting more My favorite author interview by far is John Elder Robinsons I have both of his books and am currently awaiting a third because I am personal touched by ASD and Francesca Rheanon's interview allows me a chance to let others listen into a bit of our world and understand because they are the ones who refuse the books and there's no way I'd ever get them to read it her interview has had a few willing that have either borrowed my book or bought them for themselves However even when the author or book has no personal interest to me this show has me entertained and delighted!!!!!

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