500 episodes

Zócalo Public Square’s podcast connects people to ideas and to each other through an innovative blend of ideas journalism and live events. Listen to conversations on topics ranging from politics and science to art and pop culture.

Zócalo Public Square Zócalo Public Square

    • News
    • 4.8 • 4 Ratings

Zócalo Public Square’s podcast connects people to ideas and to each other through an innovative blend of ideas journalism and live events. Listen to conversations on topics ranging from politics and science to art and pop culture.

    What Is A Good Job Now? For The Formerly Incarcerated

    What Is A Good Job Now? For The Formerly Incarcerated

    What are the best ideas and models for finding good jobs for the formerly incarcerated? How can we improve the low pay and challenging working conditions in those industries that are most likely to employ people who have been in the system? And what policies and economic changes would open more possible career paths and economic opportunities for this population?

    Amity Foundation president and CEO Doug Bond, Root & Rebound executive director Carmen Garcia, and Anti-Recidivism Coalition executive director Sam Lewis visit Zócalo to discuss how to build better career pathways for formerly incarcerated people.

    This is the fourth program in Zócalo's series “What Is a Good Job Now?” supported by the James Irvine Foundation, and was presented on January 24, 2024.

    Visit https://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/ to read our articles and learn about upcoming events.

    Follow Zócalo on X: https://twitter.com/thepublicsquare
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thepublicsquare/
    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/zocalopublicsquare
    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/z-calo-public-square

    • 1 hr 9 min
    Is AI The End Of Creativity—Or A New Beginning?

    Is AI The End Of Creativity—Or A New Beginning?

    Artists across disciplines have harnessed generative AI as mind-extenders, expanding the possibilities of their work, and unleashing new ways to see the world. But as bots get more adept at human-like thought, writers, actors, and others protest in lawsuits and on picket lines, asking: What’s left for artists? Should tech companies be allowed to use existing art to train AI engines? Who gets credit—and paid—for AI-assisted creative work? What do we lose when machine brains take over aspects of our creativity, once a defining feature of humanity? And, tantalizingly, what do we gain?

    LACMA’s Art + Technology Lab program director Joel Ferree, Concept Art Association co-founder Nicole Hendrix, Writers Guild of America AI working group member John Lopez, and interdisciplinary artist Sarah Rosalena join Zócalo, Arts for LA, the ASU Narrative and Emerging Media program, and LACMA to discuss whether AI heralds the end of humans making art to make sense of the world, or a new key to being and seeing. Moderated by Anuradha Vikram, art curator and author of Use Me at Your Own Risk.

    This program was co-presented with Arts for LA, the ASU Narrative and Emerging Media Program, and LACMA on November 28, 2023.

    Follow Zócalo:
    X: twitter.com/thepublicsquare
    Instagram: www.instagram.com/thepublicsquare/
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/
    LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/z-calo-public-square

    • 1 hr 4 min
    How Should Arts Institutions Navigate The Culture Wars?

    How Should Arts Institutions Navigate The Culture Wars?

    How are institutional leaders navigating the warring tides of politics and public opinion—tides that may steer them toward uncertain futures? Can organizations help artists, patrons, and the public find common ground, or productive ways to discuss their differences, in this moment of deep democratic and cultural conflict? And, even as they themselves struggle to stay afloat, how do arts institutions serve as spaces of civic engagement, community, and inclusion?

    MOCA director Johanna Burton, Center Theatre Group artistic director Snehal Desai, former Oregon Shakespeare Festival executive artistic director Nataki Garrett, and Whitney Museum director emeritus Adam D. Weinberg discuss how the culture wars have impacted their work, and where they see institutions, and the arts at large, going next. Moderated by Kristin Sakoda, Director of the Los Angeles County Department of Arts and Culture.

    This program was co-presented with the Thomas Mann House and Los Angeles Review of Books as part of “Arts in Times of Crises: The Role of Artists in Weakened Democracies,” on November 18, 2023.

    Follow Zócalo:
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    Facebook: www.facebook.com/
    LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/z-calo-public-square

    • 1 hr 28 min
    Must Artists Be Activists?

    Must Artists Be Activists?

    Can artists shield themselves from the demands of politics and polarized discourse or—in places and periods where activism puts their life and liberty at risk—from bodily danger? Does all their work, in a moment of crisis, have to address that crisis? And how can they know when that moment has come?

    Two women artists—social-practice artist Suzanne Lacy and photographer Catherine Opie—discuss the role they see themselves, their work, and their peers playing in sustaining, enhancing, or even strengthening democracy when it feels like everything is going up in flames. Moderated by Karen Mack, Founder and Executive Director of LA Commons.

    This program was co-presented with the Thomas Mann House and Los Angeles Review of Books as part of “Arts in Times of Crises: The Role of Artists in Weakened Democracies,” on November 18, 2023.

    Follow Zócalo:
    X: twitter.com/thepublicsquare
    Instagram: www.instagram.com/thepublicsquare/
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/
    LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/z-calo-public-square

    • 1 hr 8 min
    How Does Confronting Our History Build A Better Future?

    How Does Confronting Our History Build A Better Future?

    Environmental activist and hip-hop artist Xiuhtezcatl Martinez (Xochimilco), L.A. LGBT Center communications officer and former editor-in-chief of Out magazine Phillip Picardi, and “On Being” founder, executive producer, and host Krista Tippett visit Zócalo to discuss how society might draw strength and coax vision from the shortcomings and failures of its collective past, moderated by University of Pennsylvania historian and author of Hattiesburg, William Sturkey. Featuring a special live performance by the Pan Afrikan Peoples Arktet.

    This is the final program in Zócalo's series, “How Should Societies Remember Their Sins?,” supported by The Mellon Foundation.

    Find all essays and previous programs in the series here: https://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/feature/societies-sins-mellon/

    Follow Zócalo:
    X: https://twitter.com/thepublicsquare
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thepublicsquare/
    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/
    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/z-calo-public-square

    • 1 hr 54 min
    What Is A Good Job Now? For Fairness In the Workplace

    What Is A Good Job Now? For Fairness In the Workplace

    The state of California has some of the nation’s strongest legal protections for workers. But Californians continue to suffer from various forms of abuse by their employers—from unpaid overtime to dangerous working conditions; from wage theft to racial, ethnic, gender discrimination. What are the biggest challenges for agencies and communities as they seek to turn pro-labor legislation into better workplace realities? To what extent do our systems—from the courts to workers’ compensation to federal and state labor enforcement—create obstacles to realizing California’s promises to workers? And what steps could state and local governments, and workers themselves, take to make jobs safe from discrimination and abuse?

    California State Senator Maria Elena Durazo, warehouse worker Sara Fee, and California Labor Commissioner Assistant Chief Daniel Yu talk with Zócalo on the Capitol steps in Sacramento to discuss how to make jobs more fair for workers. Introductory comments by Don Howard, President & CEO of The James Irvine Foundation.

    This program is part of “What Is a Good Job Now?”, a series supported by The James Irvine Foundation, focusing on workers in the low-wage sectors of California’s economy, in communities across the state. Public programs and essays, grounded in workers’ experiences and realities, will explore how to make the hardest jobs more rewarding, and make life better for those who do them.

    • 58 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
4 Ratings

4 Ratings

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