100 episodes

Welcome to Business Built Freedom, the podcast made for business owners who want more out of life and ultimately, build a vehicle of wealth and freedom. We are technologists, owners, forward thinkers, and life hackers, most importantly, we are human and down to earth Aussies. Brisbane based entrepreneurs are interviewed regularly from all walks of life, in all positions of business from greenfield start-ups to long-standing owners looking for exit strategies to retire.
If you want to increase your wealth, better your health and get a residual income, sit back with a beer and relax, unless you're on the way to work….
See how the new kids are doing it, get the time you deserve with the family, gain perspective, direction and stop the business owning you, instead OWN it!

Business Built Freedom Joshua Lewis

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 14 Ratings

Welcome to Business Built Freedom, the podcast made for business owners who want more out of life and ultimately, build a vehicle of wealth and freedom. We are technologists, owners, forward thinkers, and life hackers, most importantly, we are human and down to earth Aussies. Brisbane based entrepreneurs are interviewed regularly from all walks of life, in all positions of business from greenfield start-ups to long-standing owners looking for exit strategies to retire.
If you want to increase your wealth, better your health and get a residual income, sit back with a beer and relax, unless you're on the way to work….
See how the new kids are doing it, get the time you deserve with the family, gain perspective, direction and stop the business owning you, instead OWN it!

    200|How Does Self-Awareness Affect Leadership with Lucy Faulconer

    200|How Does Self-Awareness Affect Leadership with Lucy Faulconer

    This week, we'll be talking about self-awareness around leadership with Lucy Faulconer, a leadership coach with a background in psychology and management consulting.
    To read the full transcript, visit: https://w.dorks.com.au/lucy faulconer

    • 29 min
    199|How Do You Build Rapport With Janeen Vosper

    199|How Do You Build Rapport With Janeen Vosper

    We're always told that you need to create rapport to have better customers that know, like and trust you. What is rapport? How do you know if you've built too much rapport? Can you break rapport? Janeen Vosper from SpeechPerfect.com sheds some light.
    Listen to the podcast or read more about it at Dorks Delivered blog.

    • 32 min
    198|7 Steps to Building a Smart Business Engine With Luke Fatooros Part Two

    198|7 Steps to Building a Smart Business Engine With Luke Fatooros Part Two

    Part two of our engaging conversation with Luke Fatooros.

    • 33 min
    197|7 Steps to Building a Smart Business Engine With Luke Fatooros Part One

    197|7 Steps to Building a Smart Business Engine With Luke Fatooros Part One

    7 Steps to Building a Smart Business Engine With Luke Fatooros
    We've all been in a spot in our business where we're trying to work out how to get from A to B or how to get to the next level. But what is the next level? How many levels are there?
    Luke Fatooros from Ideas Into Business shares with us the 7 steps to building a smart business engine to give you time, money, and freedom.
    Learn more on how to build a smart business engine at dorksdelivered.com.au
    Luke's Business Journey Why are there seven steps? What are the steps to building a smart business engine to give you the time, money, and freedom?
    Luke: Let me start with my $12 million mistake or failure. It's something that I don't recommend, but this was my first step into business. My first business was a store that my father and I shared with $800. We thought we were going to conquer the world, and the first 14 months were a living hell. We didn't know what we were doing. We had all the ambition and enthusiasm, and that was really what got us through the first 14 months.
    When we eventually learned a few things, such as how to distinguish myself from the competition, my first joint venture took off. After all that pain, it eventually became a $12 million, 65-staff business after five years. I was winning awards like Entrepreneur of the Year, Microsoft top companies, the Westpac finance.
    And then I lost everything. My partner had to go to the staff and tell them we had to close this business. What came out of that were life-changing lessons. There are three critical lessons I want to share with you, and this was how the seven steps were formulated.
    1. Understand Cash Flow Luke: I had to learn how money works and how money flows. The first lesson was to stop trading time for money—I didn't know what that meant. I had to move from a limited earning structure to an unlimited earning structure.
    When I lost that business, I learned the difference between being self-employed and being a business owner, and I understood creating wealth in business. I realised that my business was worth nothing because it was strapped to me. We become burnt out when trying to build a business the wrong way. It took me 7 years to recover.
    2. Work on Your Internal Structure Luke: By contrast, when I built my second business, a distribution business, I had three factories in China, the Philippines, and Korea, and I'm supplying five countries from a desk.
    That gives you a lot of flexibility with the way you can travel. You're not tied to a location, which is something that's becoming very important with our current times.
    Luke: If someone saw me with my notebook at my home office, they would think it's a joke, a hobby. But that business was valued at $3.5 million up to 3 years. It's not how fancy a business looks on the outside. It's how structured internally.
    When I was 12 years old, I was given the opportunity to make these number plate brackets. It sounds like such a boring product, but I was getting $6 a bracket. I was able to make one in 1.5 hours. I sped up my processes. By the time I was 13, I was making 10 number plate brackets an hour, so I was then making $60 an hour relatively.
    I went on to employ people, but the lesson that I learned was people are lazy. Don't tie things to money, and don't tie things to yourself. If you have a problem or a key person in your business has a problem, how do you overcome that? How do you make sure that you aren't the key person? How was that valuable to the next person that was buying it?
    3. Build a Strong Foundation Luke: This comes to this thing called sequencing. You cannot step out of the engine. You cannot hand down management or the responsibilities with regard to the foundation of your business to anyone else. If you have a vehicle that's got a broken engine, you cannot paint it green hoping that the engine would work.
    That is what people do in business. They change the website or invest in social media marketing and think this

    • 30 min
    196|How to Leverage Social Media to Generate Clients With Chantal Gerardy

    196|How to Leverage Social Media to Generate Clients With Chantal Gerardy

    How to Leverage Social Media to Generate Clients With Chantal Gerardy
    We're always told to leverage social media sites to bring in more business, but what does that actually mean? Sometimes just putting up posts of cats or just resharing things work. Some things don't.
    This week, Chantal Gerardy, an online business strategist, talks to us about how to leverage social media to generate paying clients.
    Get more tips on how to leverage social media at dorksdelivered.com.au
    Should you be on all social media sites? Is there any reason you should be on every single social media site? 
    Chantal: Hell, no. We wouldn't sleep if we are on every single platform. I honestly believe that we just need to be where our ideal customers are, but we also need to be where it makes us comfortable. If you're not comfortable on a certain platform, then maybe that platform is not for you.
    Why Facebook is the best social media for marketing? Chantal: Facebook is my favourite because there are so many people on Facebook. I love being on Facebook, and I love working with clients on Facebook. It's quite a user-friendly platform and it's social, which means you don't have to be overly sales-y. You can focus on building meaningful relationships, and you can find your ideal client on them.
    Should you do your digital marketing? Eating Apples Versus Growing Apples  A lot of people have someone who's managing their Facebook profile, a niece or a nephew, and they wonder why it's not bringing any more people. My personal thought is if you're really good at eating apples, that does not mean you're really good at growing apple trees. That's the way that I would define the difference between someone who's using a platform and someone who's actually jumping in to use the platform to make money. I'm sure you see that all the time. 
    How does Facebook digital marketing work? How does Facebook digital marketing work versus just putting up posts of cats, dogs, the last job that you did, or smiling customers? 
    Chantal: There are just way too many people out there, and there are way too many cats and dog photos. Like you said, just because you can log into the profile and share your cat photos doesn't mean you know how to generate paying customers. The good news is that you can learn how.
    Many business owners think that they actually have to get a marketing degree or they've got to outsource it to someone else. I'm massively hyperactive and completely non-techy and I taught myself social media marketing, but I learned how to do it the non-fluffy and cookie-cutter way. I was able to transform my business and get paying customers. If I can do it, anyone can do it. But there is a skill to it. 
    If you don't want to be stressed, overwhelmed, and frustrated, it's important that you learn how to properly use the things that you are going to use in your business, which means reading the instructions.
    Organic Reach Versus Paid Advertising There are a lot of things when it comes to Facebook and marketing that people get confused with, such as paid advertising versus organic advertising. What is the difference between the two? What works and what doesn't? What did work and what do you think is going to work?
    Chantal: We have to realise that the social media platforms are businesses so they're constantly going to be asking you for money. Does organic work? A lot of people say that it doesn't work.
    However, for myself and all the clients that I've worked with, we see massive results. It's like building a house. If you don't get the foundations right, which is kind of like your organic strategy and your organic marketing, it doesn't matter how much money you put on it, it's simply not going to work.
    At the end of the day, it's how you position yourself online. You have to make sure that you position yourself as a professional. You've got to understand your privacy settings. If you're going to be a little bit aggressive or risque in your marketing, then you've got t

    • 27 min
    195|Psychological Safety at Work With Geoffrey Wade

    195|Psychological Safety at Work With Geoffrey Wade

    Psychological Safety at Work With Geoffrey Wade
    How do you work with your staff? How close are you to your staff?
    Dorks Delivered Director Joshua Lewis and Geoffrey Wade, the founder of Onirik, talk about psychological safety at work. 
    Learn more about psychological safety at work at dorksdelivered.com.au
    What Is Psychological Safety in the Workplace? What is psychological safety in the workplace?
    Geoffrey: It's a piece of techno-jargon, isn't it? It sounds really good. I'm comfortable using technical jargon. However, I prefer to think of it and describe it as team dynamics. The academic nomenclature has its place, but it's a lot easier to think about it in plain day-to-day terms.
    People Speak Up Geoffrey: Team dynamics cover how we work together with one another, how we communicate with one another, and how we behave with one another. As a leader, we create a culture or an environment where people feel safe to speak up. They are comfortable asking questions. They feel safe to critique the status quo and make mistakes.
    In the context of the team in the organisation, they classify mistakes as "learning opportunities" rather than "they made a mistake." We made a mistake. Let's clean it up and what did you learn from that? What would you do differently next time?
    Safety is not really about creating an environment where we live in cotton wool. By "safe to speak up" I mean we can ask questions like, "What the hell's going on here?" and the team will take that without feeling threatened because they know the questions are about learning and improvement. We can challenge one another, and we can be a little provocative with one another.
    I can tell a lot about the research, but I'll tell a story. It happened in Queensland last year.
    There was an underground coal mine up in Northern Queensland. There's a big heavy machinery underground churning out coal. When you mine coal, there's a flammable explosive gas, so the mines were carefully designed with ventilation to remove that gas, to make it safe for workers to be there and operate machines, and to avoid undesired explosions. They've got a new longwall up and running, and they were getting about 60% more gas from the coal than they anticipated in their design. That was a real problem because they couldn't evacuate the gas as quickly as they needed. Everyone knew about it—the workers, supervisors, and managers—and they kept running that machine, generating more gas than they could clear. No one spoke up. You can predict where it went. Thank God no one was killed, but people were injured. The CEO of that company said he was stunned that no one felt safe enough to speak up. People could have died, but they were continuing to work in that really dangerous environment because they didn't have the psychological safety to speak up.
    The Precursor of Other Measures Geoffrey: Psychological safety is the precursor of so many other measures that are important in a business. It is the lead indicator for employee engagement and mental well-being.
    It's a really critical human wellness measure for your workplace, and it correlates with other work satisfaction measures. These then correlate with productivity, performance, customer experience, and growth. And these correlations are not random.
    Like many people, I believe employee engagement is an important measure. But as a statistician, I also understand that we can show a correlation in an individual organisation between employee engagement and other performance measures.
    You can get Gallup's data, which was pulled from 200 companies, and then massaged it so it all fits together. Across 200 companies, they could show a correlation between employee engagement and commercial outcomes. In an individual company, you can't.
    With psychological safety, we can show statistical correlations between psychological safety and the KPIs that matter. You get correlation coefficients and impact percentages, and that's profound. It's an important

    • 35 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
14 Ratings

14 Ratings

C Coelho ,

Highly engaging show

When you hear Joshua speak, you know straight away that it comes from a passion for business. And for helping businesses. What that does is it makes the conversations so free flowing, that it’s easy to get engaged and gain value from it. Highly recommend subscribing.

MadelineClift ,

From a guests point of view

Being someone who rarely listens to podcasts because they can be a little all over the shop, when I chatted with Josh it was great. Very easy to actually talk about what weve been doing with our business. Worth a listen and very interesting.

Perfectly Beautiful ,

Always a great listen

As a business owner listening to Business Built Freedom is a great way to build my knowledge

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