1,645 episodes

The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

Business Daily BBC Podcasts

    • Business
    • 4.6 • 109 Ratings

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The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    What’s holding Latin America back?

    What’s holding Latin America back?

    It's a region blessed with incredible natural resources, from copper to lithium to rich agricultural lands. It’s home to vibrant cultures, amazing music and creative and talented people.
    And yet it has never fulfilled its enormous economic potential.
    All too often it’s lurched from boom to bust, from hyperinflation to debt crises.
    We ask why that is.
    We consider corruption, crime, inequality, excessive bureaucracy and weak governance.
    We look at Argentina’s long decline and Venezuela’s economic implosion, and ask what Latin America can do to bring greater prosperity to its people.
    Produced and presented by Gideon Long
    (Image: A man waves an Argentine flag during the demonstration. Members of the Argentine Workers' General Confederation and social organizations protested against new Argentine President Javier Milei's economic reforms, outside the Justice Palace in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Credit: Getty Images)

    • 20 min
    Business Daily meets: Robot inventor Sandy Enoch

    Business Daily meets: Robot inventor Sandy Enoch

    We head to the robot workshop home of Marty the robotical.
    Sandy Enoch founded the Scottish tech firm Robotical which creates educational robots.
    Produced and presented by Dougal Shaw.
    (Image: Marty the robot)

    • 17 min
    Crypto and football: Uneasy team mates

    Crypto and football: Uneasy team mates

    Where next for the sometimes tricky relationship between football and crypto companies?
    We look at how some of the biggest clubs, and players, have embraced crypto products, and what that means for supporters.
    From fan engagement tokens to NFTs, advertised by the world’s biggest stars, to deals with Premier League clubs which turned out to be fraudulent. Is it putting fans in a potentially difficult financial position?
    Or just giving them another way to support the team they love?
    Produced and presented by Imran Rahman-Jones
    (Referee Arda Kardeşler performs the pregame toss with a coin bearing the Bitcoin logo for a match between Beşiktaş and Fenerbahçe on May 8, 2022 in Istanbul, Turkey. Credit: Getty Images)

    • 17 min
    Does the guitar have an image problem?

    Does the guitar have an image problem?

    Picture a rock 'n' roll icon like Jimmy Page, or Jimmy Hendrix, and they've probably got an electric guitar in their hands.
    But, as classic rock - and classic rockers - continue to age, is the guitar industry struggling to attract younger customers?
    In six years, electric guitar company Gibson has gone from filing for bankruptcy to opening its first flagship store outside the US.
    We hear from Led Zeppelin's Jimmy Page, Grammy nominated singer James Bay, and one of the world's foremost female luthiers to find out whether the guitar's association with rock 'n' roll has become bad for business.
    Produced and presented by Will Chalk.
    (Image: Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin performing on stage at Earl's Court, London, May 1975. Jimmy Page is playing a Gibson EDS-1275 double necked guitar. Credit: Getty Images)

    • 17 min
    Is the US bet on sports gambling paying off?

    Is the US bet on sports gambling paying off?

    Sports betting is a relatively new industry in the US.
    Until 2018 you could only legally bet on sports in the state on Nevada, the home to Las Vegas.
    New Jersey was the first state to legalise sports betting six years ago and since then, a total of 38 states across America have done the same.
    Hannah Mullane looks at how the industry has grown so rapidly and discusses the consequences of the industry which has been allowed to evolve with very little regulation.
    (Produced and presented by Hannah Mullane)
    (Image: Detroit Lions fans pose prior to a game against the San Francisco 49ers in the NFC Championship Game at Levi's Stadium on January 28, 2024 in Santa Clara, California. Image credit: Getty)

    • 17 min
    Uganda's refugee women turned entrepreneurs

    Uganda's refugee women turned entrepreneurs

    Stella, Dawa and Salome arrived at the Bidi Bidi refugee camp in north-western Uganda with little more than the clothes they were wearing.
    Now, all three are entrepreneurs and businesswomen, running thriving businesses and earning enough money to clothe, feed and send their children to school.
    Can their stories help development agencies and governments deliver support to those most in need?
    (Picture: Salome, picking crops in a field in Uganda. Copyright: Village Enterprise)
    Presented and produced by Sam Fenwick

    • 17 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
109 Ratings

109 Ratings

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