22 episodes

Political, Ethical, Artistic & Cultural Engagement (PEACE) – a monthly event hosted by Paddington Anglican Church, aimed at serving the community by promoting and cultivating deep conversations about life, the world and everything

PEACEtalks Paddington Church

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

Political, Ethical, Artistic & Cultural Engagement (PEACE) – a monthly event hosted by Paddington Anglican Church, aimed at serving the community by promoting and cultivating deep conversations about life, the world and everything

    Dr Michael Mawson - Speaking of God in the Midst of COVID-19: Insights from Julian of Norwich

    Dr Michael Mawson - Speaking of God in the Midst of COVID-19: Insights from Julian of Norwich

    What does it means to be Christian in response to COVID-19 and its devastating impact? How do we speak of God in the midst of the the widespread anxieties and fears caused by the pandemic? How do witness to God’s truth and justice in light of the deep inequities that the pandemic has helped unveil? In the fourteenth century, Julian of Norwich composed her Revelations of Divine Love in response to many of these same kinds of questions and challenges. This evening will therefore provide a chance to listen to and reflect on Julian’s theology of God’s abundant love.

    Dr Michael Mawson teaches theology and ethics at the United Theological College/ Charles Sturt University. He is from Aotearoa New Zealand and before moving to Sydney lived and taught in Aberdeen, Scotland. His current research and writing focuses on Dietrich Bonhoeffer, theology and ageing, postcolonial theologies and ecclesiology.

    This event is PEACEtalks: a quarterly event (held on a Thursday or Saturday evening) starting at 7pm hosted by Paddington Anglican Church aimed at serving the community by promoting and cultivating deep conversations about life, the world and everything. ‘PEACE’ stands for ‘political, ethical, artistic & cultural engagement’. Also on iTunes / Apple Podcasts by searching for PEACEtalks.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Refuge Reimagined

    Refuge Reimagined

    The global crisis of forced displacement is growing every year. At the same time, Western Christians' sympathy toward refugees is increasingly overshadowed by concerns about personal and national security, economics, and culture. We urgently need a perspective that understands both Scripture and current political realities and that can be applied at the levels of the church, the nation, and the globe.

    Mark R. Glanville and Luke Glanville reflect on their new book Refuge Reimagined offering a new approach to compassion for displaced people: a biblical ethic of kinship. God's people, they argue, are consistently called to extend kinship—a mutual responsibility and solidarity—to those who are marginalized and without a home. Drawing on their respective expertise in Old Testament studies and international relations, the two brothers engage a range of disciplines to demonstrate how this ethic is consistently conveyed throughout the Bible and can be practically embodied today.

    Glanville and Glanville apply the kinship ethic to issues such as the current mission of the church, national identity and sovereignty, and possibilities for a cooperative global response to the refugee crisis. Challenging the fear-based ethic that often motivates Christian approaches, they envision a more generous, creative, and hopeful way forward.

    Mark R. Glanville (PhD, Bristol University) is associate professor of pastoral theology at Regent College, Vancouver, and an Old Testament scholar. Mark’s research explores the topic of kinship in the Old Testament, focusing on how scripture calls God’s people to enfold vulnerable people as kindred, especially displaced people seeking a place to belong. He is the author of Adopting the Stranger as Kindred in Deuteronomy (2018) and Freed to Be God's Family: The Book of Exodus (2021).

    Luke Glanville (PhD, University of Queensland) is associate professor of international relations at Australian National University. Luke’s research focuses on international political theory, the history of international political thought, responsibility to protect, and refugee protection. He is the author of Sovereignty and the Responsibility to Protect: A New History (2014) and Sharing Responsibility: The History and Future of Protection from Atrocities(2021).

    With host Ebony Birchall a lawyer who specialises in large-scale public interest litigation. She has acted in landmark legal matters such as the Manus Island class action and the Immigration Data Breach representative complaint and is currently working on investigations concerning government accountability. She researches political philosophy, human rights and the impact of politics and culture on ethics. She is on the People Seeking Asylum team for Common Grace and is a fundraising co-ordinator for the Katoke Trust for Overseas Aid.

    This event is PEACEtalks: a quarterly event (held on a Thursday or Saturday evening) starting at 7pm hosted by Paddington Anglican Church aimed at serving the community by promoting and cultivating deep conversations about life, the world and everything. ‘PEACE’ stands for ‘political, ethical, artistic & cultural engagement’. Also on iTunes / Apple Podcasts by searching for PEACEtalks.

    • 1 hr 14 min
    Rosie Clare Shorter - Marginalisation and Grace

    Rosie Clare Shorter - Marginalisation and Grace

    Marginalisation and Grace: Centres and peripheries in a world turned inside out.

    There are many ways to think about and define the centres and peripheries of Christianity, who or what controls, shapes and influences the markers of belonging and right belief, who or what is mainstream or marginal. This talk, which focuses on ideas of centres and peripheries in the Anglican Diocese of Sydney, was intended to sit alongside three other talks at a – now cancelled – conference in New Zealand, which combined, would explore ideas of centres and peripheries in Protestant Christianity in Australia, along the lines of gender, sexuality and ‘race’.

    In this talk, Rosie Clare will consider some of the ways in which gender and sexuality can be used to mark the spaces of centre and periphery, power and non-power, and what we might learn or do differently if we were to listen to those who speak and lead from the margins.

    Rosie Clare Shorter is a PhD Candidate in the Religion and Society Research Cluster at Western Sydney University. She is studying Anglicanism as a lived religion in Sydney. She is interested in hearing about how people live their faith, and in exploring the interaction of gender, sexuality, evangelism and religious authority. She has a Master of Research and Bachelor of Creative Arts from Macquarie University.

    This event is PEACEtalks (see PEACEtalks.info): a monthly event (held on a Thursday or Saturday evening) starting at 7pm hosted by Paddington Anglican Church aimed at serving the community by promoting and cultivating deep conversations about life, the world and everything. ‘PEACE’ stands for ‘political, ethical, artistic & cultural engagement’. Also on iTunes / Apple Podcasts by searching for PEACEtalks.

    • 58 min
    Rev Dr Jason John - Up in Smoke: Beauty, Generosity and Justice amidst the Bushfire Emergency

    Rev Dr Jason John - Up in Smoke: Beauty, Generosity and Justice amidst the Bushfire Emergency

    Now that the bushfire emergency of the last few months has eased, the temptation—especially for those of us in major cities that may have been choked with smoke, but largely avoided the flames—is to think of life as having more or less returned to normal. But something happened this summer, something profound, with the potential to reshape our common life and our future if we will allow ourselves to soak it in. These fires have left their mark on the landscape, and their ecological impacts will likely resonate way beyond the years it will take for all the charred trees to be overtaken by fresh growth. But they have also scorched our cultural and political terrain as well. So if we’re looking for fresh growth, where might it be found? Will we allow ourselves to be shaped by the deep lessons of this catastrophe? The evening will explore the landscape—theological, political, cultural—left behind by the flames.   

    This event is PEACEtalks: a monthly event (held on a Thursday or Saturday evening) starting at 7pm hosted by Paddington Anglican Church aimed at serving the community by promoting and cultivating deep conversations about life, the world and everything. ‘PEACE’ stands for ‘political, ethical, artistic & cultural engagement’. Also on iTunes / Apple Podcasts by searching for PEACEtalks. 

    About our speaker: 

    Rev Dr Jason John completed an honours in zoology before converting to Christianity, and studying for ordination.  After his first placement as a University chaplain, he completed a PhD and wrote some books on the implications of evolution, ecology and environmentalism for the Christian story, especially in rescuing us from our human-centred theology. Throughout his twenty years of ministry he has helped the church explore the implications of our faith in a Creator for our relationship with the rest of Creation, and in encouraging all people to live as better members of the Earth family. This included working as an environment officer in the University of Queensland Student Union, starting the Adelaide and Bellingen eco-faith communities, working on the team at Uniting Mission and Education, and now as a half-time member of the Uniting Advocacy Team, where his focus has swung more specifically to engaging Uniting and the wider church in emissions reductions and public climate advocacy. Recently Jason found a cathartic outlet for the often-arduous path of environmental engagement in slam poetry, winning the 2019 Bellingen poetry slam and placing 3rd at the Australian Poetry Slam national final at the Opera House in 2019. He lives in the forest with his family, and many other members of the Earth family, trying to be a good neighbour to most of them.  

    • 1 hr 18 min
    Doing good: How do you work out what is ‘good’ when politics are at play?

    Doing good: How do you work out what is ‘good’ when politics are at play?

    Followers of Jesus are commanded to turn from evil to do good and to never cease in doing good. But when it comes to political issues, we find our nation and our churches, split over what exactly can be defined as ‘good’. For example, asking the question “is it good to allow asylum seekers into Australia?” will produce a range of responses amongst a Christian audience. Ebony will draw from her Ph.D. research regarding the impact of politics and culture on ethics to challenge us to think through how we reach our opinions around what is ‘good’.

    Resources for more information: Common Grace.

    Ebony Birchall is a lawyer who specialises in large-scale public interest litigation. She has acted in landmark legal matters such as the Manus Island class action and the Immigration Data Breach representative complaint and is currently working on investigations concerning government accountability. She researches political philosophy, human rights and the impact of politics and culture on ethics. She is on the People Seeking Asylum team for Common Grace and is a fundraising co-ordinator for the Katoke Trust for Overseas Aid.

    This event is PEACEtalks: a monthly event (held on a Thursday or Saturday evening) starting at 7pm hosted by Paddington Anglican Church aimed at serving the community by promoting and cultivating deep conversations about life, the world and everything. ‘PEACE’ stands for ‘political, ethical, artistic & cultural engagement’. Also on iTunes / Apple Podcasts by searching for PEACEtalks.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Bethlehem with love: Advent with Palestinian Christian Theology

    Bethlehem with love: Advent with Palestinian Christian Theology

    Rev Katherine Rainger shares with us "From Bethlehem with love: Advent reflections in conversation with Palestinian Christian Theology"

    “Come and see” and then “go and tell” is the message that Palestinian Christians give to the church. This PEACEtalks is an invitation to “come and hear” and reflect on what it means to welcome Jesus while also being attentive to the experiences of Palestinian Christians in the land of his birth. Rev Katherine Rainger leads an Advent reflection that draws on the witness of Palestinian Christians, the “living stones” of the holy land who live out their faith with a commitment to justice, reconciliation and peace.

    The two YouTube clips included:

    Open Your Heart {Christmas in Bethlehem: Real Peace In You and Me} - The story of the birth of Jesus told by the people of Bethlehem. In Palestine. {Credits} This is a mini-documentary titled "O Little Town of Bethlehem". Directed by Tim Parsons.

    Areej Masoud at St. Andrews, Canberra

    Resources for more information: Palestine Israel Ecumenical Network

    Rev Katherine Rainger is a priest, chaplain, teacher and theologian. She is a member of Friends of Sabeel Australia, a group associated with the Sabeel Ecumenical Liberation Theology Centre in Jerusalem, and the Palestine Israel Ecumenical Network.

    This event is part of PEACEtalks: a monthly event (held on a Thursday or Saturday evening) starting at 7pm hosted by Paddington Anglican Church aimed at serving the community by promoting and cultivating deep conversations about life, the world and everything. ‘PEACE’ stands for ‘political, ethical, artistic & cultural engagement’. Also on iTunes / Apple Podcasts by searching for PEACEtalks.

    • 1 hr 11 min

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