414 episodes

Leaders are learners. The best leaders never stop working to make themselves better. The Learning Leader Show Is series of conversations with the world's most thoughtful leaders. Entrepreneurs, CEO's, World-Class Athletes, Coaches, Best-Selling Authors, and much more.

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Haw‪k‬ Ryan Hawk

    • Management
    • 4.8 • 57 Ratings

Leaders are learners. The best leaders never stop working to make themselves better. The Learning Leader Show Is series of conversations with the world's most thoughtful leaders. Entrepreneurs, CEO's, World-Class Athletes, Coaches, Best-Selling Authors, and much more.

    414: Erin Meyer - How To Build A High Performance Culture (No Rules Rules)

    414: Erin Meyer - How To Build A High Performance Culture (No Rules Rules)

    Text LEARNERS to 44222 to learn more...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12  https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Erin Meyer is a professor at INSEAD, one of the leading international business schools. Erin conducted an in-depth study with Reed Hastings, Co-Founder and CEO of Netflix, investigating the underlying principles necessary for building a corporate culture that is inventive, fast, and flexible. The results of that research were published in their book No Rules Rules. In 2019, Erin was listed by the Thinkers50, for the second time, as one of the fifty most impactful business writers in the world and in 2018 she was selected by HR magazine as one of the top 30 most influential HR thinkers of the year. 
    Notes:
    “Corporate culture can be a mushy marshland of vague language and incomplete, ambiguous definitions. What’s worse, company values — as articulated — rarely match the way people behave in reality.” The Netflix culture deck. 127 slides originally intended for internal use but one that Reed Hastings (CEO) shared online in 2009. Sheryl Sandberg called it “the most important document ever to come out of Silicon Valley.” Erin said "I loved the deck for its honesty. And loathed it for its content.” "If you want your culture to come alive, you need to avoid speaking in absolutes." Instead, use either or… Security or High Performance? Candor or Comfort? Why did the Netflix culture deck go viral? "This is a company that tells the truth. It said what it believed. That is rare." On May 31, 2015 you got a cold email from Reed Hastings (CEO of Netflix)… Reed told her that he read her book, The Culture Map, loved it, and was having his leadership team at Netflix read it. Erin's biggest surprise during her time researching Netflix and writing with Reed? "That management paradigms are hangovers from the industrial era. Previously, the #1 goal was error elimination. That isn't the #1 goal at Netflix. It's innovation." Reed Hastings had a company before Netflix called Pure Software. He put in a lot of rules and processes. He realized that "if you dummy proof the system only dummies want to work there." Too many processes can kill flexibility and innovation. This is "applicable to any environment where innovation is more important than error prevention." "Most rules are put in place to deal with low performers." "Instead, create an environment with 'talent density.' Only high performers..." Performance is Contagious: Professor Will Felps, of the University of New South Wales in Australia, conducted a study demonstrating contagious behavior in the work environment. He created several teams of 4 college students and asked each to complete a management task in 45 minutes. The teams who did the best work would receive a financial reward of $100. (Bezos: "People are pretty good at learning high standards simply through exposure," writes Bezos. "High standards are contagious. Bring a new person onto a high standards team, and they'll quickly adapt. The opposite is also true) The two different types of jobs: Operational - Ice cream scoopers Creative - Rely on your brain Pay Top of Market for talent - Matt Thunell (Manager of Original Content) said about Netflix, “We live in a walled-garden of excellence, where everyone is a high performer. You go into these meetings and it’s like the talent and brain power in the room could generate the office electricity. People are challenging one another, building up arguments. That’s why we get so much done at such incredible speed here. It’s because of the crazy high talent density.” With that said, Netflix doesn’t believe in “Pay-Per-Performance” bonuses. When you first began to collaborate with Reed to write this book, Erin asked him how he would find the time to collaborate. He said, “Oh, I can give this pretty much

    • 1 hr 6 min
    413: Brook Cupps - Living Your Values: Tough, Passionate, Unified, & Thankful

    413: Brook Cupps - Living Your Values: Tough, Passionate, Unified, & Thankful

    Text LEARNERS to 44222 for more...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12  https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Brook Cupps is a leadership teacher and the coach of the Centerville High School basketball team. In 2021, he led his team to the first state championship in school history. He is best known as a leader who truly lives his core values. They are: Tough, Passionate, Unified, & Thankful.
    Notes:
    Brook's personal mantras: Wolf - Wolves travel in packs. They are not good by themselves. They need the pack. BC needs people around him. Loves teams. "Wolves are more badass than lions or tigers. You don't see a wolf in a circus." Chop Wood - "I've never viewed myself as talented, but I'm willing to work. We say chop chop. When things are going well, get to work. When things are bad, get to work. The connection is always back to work." The Man In The Arena - "I had to develop this over time. The critics used to bother me and I would listen to them. It affected my confidence. I learned that the most important opinions are the people in the arena with me." Brene Brown - “A lot of cheap seats in the arena are filled with people who never venture onto the floor. They just hurl mean-spirited criticisms and put-downs from a safe distance. The problem is, when we stop caring what people think and stop feeling hurt by cruelty, we lose our ability to connect. But when we’re defined by what people think, we lose the courage to be vulnerable. Therefore, we need to be selective about the feedback we let into our lives. For me, if you’re not in the arena also getting your ass kicked, I’m not interested in your feedback.” Purpose - "My purpose is to inspire others to strive for excellence over success." Self awareness leads to self confidence - Know who you are. Be comfortable with who you are. "You can't be tough alone. You need others." Foxhole Friends - It takes time to build foxhole friend relationships. "With my foxhole friends, I can be completely open. They tell me the truth. They have the freedom to criticize me." Coach Z -- Dave Zeller. “He never won a District. He’s the best coach I’ve ever been around. A state championship isn’t success. It’s the impact you have on the kids because nobody’s going to tell me that those guys that won state championships are better coaches than Z was.” Core Values: Values become real when you define the behaviors that exemplify the value... Tough - Positive body language leads you to be fight ready Passionate - Choosing extra work leads you to steal inches Unified - Speaking and acting with urgency leads you to not flinching in big moments Thankful - Showing love for one another through touches (help someone off the floor, give them a five after they make a mistake) Unified --  You must speak and act with urgency. "If you choose to remain silent when someone has done something wrong, then that is selfish." Choosing the easier path of not saying anything is selfish. The selfless act is having the guts to speak up when it's needed. Patch Adams - "Indifference is the greatest disease of all." You need to stand for something or you stand for nothing... "Your behaviors are the crux to your values." Do your behaviors match the values you claim to be yours? Gabe Cupps (Brook's son) entered the conversation for a few minutes... Gabe sent a text to each player on the team before tournament games that simply said, "We're gonna win." Where does that confidence come from? "It's the work put in leading up to the big moments." Gabe originally tried out for the North Coast Blue Chips AAU team... The same team that Bronny James (LeBron James Jr) played on... During a break in the action, he asked Bronny to play 1 on 1... "I didn't know how good I was. I wanted to see." Gabe earned their respect and made the team... Later LeBron noticed Brook's coaching abi

    • 1 hr 15 min
    412: Kevin Sharer (Former CEO of Amgen) - What Operational Excellence Looks Like

    412: Kevin Sharer (Former CEO of Amgen) - What Operational Excellence Looks Like

    Text LEARNERS to 44222...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12 https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Kevin Sharer has a distinguished career as a successful CEO and Board Member. He is currently a senior lecturer at Harvard University Business School and continues to mentor a select number of senior executives. Either as a Chairman, independent director, or mentor, Sharer has been a part of more than 20 successful CEO-successor transitions. Kevin led Amgen for 20 years, first as President and then as CEO for 12 years. Under Sharer’s leadership, the company achieved annual revenue of $16 billion with operations in 55 countries. 
    Notes:
    "What Operational Excellence Looks Like" Must know the details Must have a listening system to know where problems brew The leaders have a clear agreement with the team on what success is A cadence of clear communication The leader must embody the behavior... They are the model Must have real empathy for people and care about them The leader needs to assess when things go wrong so that they don't make the same mistake twice... Kevin spent 110 days underwater in a submarine... When he left the Navy, he knew he wanted to be a manager. He joined a program at AT&T to become one... He had an ambition to rise high in an organization Kevin's dad - A military aviator. His hero and role model. his dad cared a lot about leadership... How did Kevin earn the CEO role at Amgen? Spent 8 years as the President of the company. And "made it pretty obvious" to hire him for the CEO role He consistently delivered results and formed a strong partnership with the CEO How to sustain what's special about a company as it grows? The book Built to Last by Jim Collins was very helpful.... How to create and live your values? They are not defined by what's written down, it's the behavior of the people. And that starts at the top... Understand what your real values are. If you don't believe in the values, you shouldn't work there... You "have to have social data to know that the values are real." Ask others in the organization: "Are the values you experience consistent with the values stated by the company?" How he got hired as the President at Amgen? "I first decided that I wanted to be a General Manager and not a functional specialists." Kevin pursued that through General Electric and got great experience...They hired him in part because of his broad range of experience. It was a multi-step interview process. Kevin interviewed with 20 people at the company before getting the offer... Listening ability: Kevin went from bad to great... "On the way up in my career, I had the view that I was so fast, so smart... It was working. I thought I was being helpful by telling others what I thought, but I was cutting off the full picture." Kevin had an eye opening moment when he asked the CEO of IBM to talk about leadership with his team... "I learned to listen for comprehension. Listen to understand first." "You need to listen to the entire eco-system." Big idea: Pick 10 CEOs who didn't make it: "Seven of them weren't situationally aware." What are some "must-have" hiring qualities? A record of good knowledge Great communication skill Comfort in their own skin Curious - they must ask questions Answer the question, "what are your goals?" Answer the question, "what have you learned from failure?" "If five people were asked about you, what would they say?" Their accomplishments speak for themselves. They don't have to overly sell themselves They need to "clearly want the job." A good sense of humor Hiring trap: "There is a bias for us to hire people like us. It's overwhelming. We're wired to think, "other is dangerous." We must be aware of that."

    • 57 min
    411: Ryan Petersen (CEO of Flexport) - How To Build A High Velocity Team

    411: Ryan Petersen (CEO of Flexport) - How To Build A High Velocity Team

    Text LEARNERS to 44222 for more...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12  https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Ryan Petersen is the CEO and Founder of Flexport. Prior to starting Flexport to fix the user experience in global trade, Ryan was co-founder and CEO of ImportGenius.com, a data-as-a-service business for global shipping. Flexport hit a $3.2 Billion valuation after $1 billion investment led by SoftBank.
    Notes:
    Excellence = Curiosity - "It's a more fun way to live." Learners Appreciative Have fun "It doesn't have to be boring." The importance of writing as a leader: "I write a lot of essays. Some are published. Some aren't." Communication: "It's a huge part of the job of a leader." For investor updates... "It's good practice." Try to use humor, learn something new, don't be boring, get people "pumped up" Raising money from investors: "It's like your love life. You have to earn it. There are no shortcuts. You need to have a business that doesn't need them." "We built a track record over the 15 years prior to raising money." Masayoshi Son is the CEO of Softbank. He is a Japanese billionaire technology entrepreneur, investor, and philanthropist. Ryan met with him and earned a $1 Billion investment... Making Flexport worth $3.2 Billion. Flexport became the fastest growing company in Silicon Valley. Ryan wrote an essay about raising a lot of money so that they could ride out a "100 year storm." How was he able to raise so much? "Don't do an auction. I said, 'I'm only talking to you.' Create a win-win. See the world through their eyes." Masa had written a 300 year vision. Ryan said, "The audacity to have a 300 year vision, it just resonated with me." "One of our core values is to play the long game." Flexport enables all parties to move large product around the world. It was born out of Ryan discovering the pain of shipping. There is a lack of technology with freight forwarders. There was no culture of customer satisfaction. There was high friction - "We counted 984 steps to get a product shipped." Paul Graham, one of the greatest investors of all time and founder of Y-Combinator said this about Ryan Petersen: Ryan is what I call an armor-piercing shell: a founder who keeps going through obstacles that would make other people give up. But he's not just determined. He sees things other people don't see. The freight business is both huge and very backward, and yet who of all the thousands of people starting startups noticed? Ryan Petersen." By 2016, Flexport was serving 700 clients across 64 countries. Tech Crunch described it as the unsexiest trillion-dollar startup. Flexport has grown to 1,800 employees across 14 offices and 6 warehouses, and 10,000 clients. His goal: "Drive velocity: You need speed in the right direction. Velocity is the key to success. That's culture ultimately." The two forms of bureaucracy: Too many rules, order No rules, no process, chaos Need to find the balance between the two "Transparency helps get people aligned." Doing an open Slack Q&A with all employees -- Helps with transparency. What Ryan looks for when hiring a leader? And why Ryan admires Parker Conrad from Zenefits: He's "hungry, curious, has a chip on his shoulder, determined, ambitious, and solves complex problems." The profession of sales: It's "one of the most misunderstood professions. It's part of all jobs. You have to persuade, create value." "Sales is about creating value for others. Create win-wins. So much is repeat games. Almost nothing is a one time transaction." Obsession with company culture: "When I reach out to top execs, they always take the call if I'm asking about culture." The secret to the tech industry: Everyone is willing to share tools, mindset, and lessons learned with one another. It's "normal to pick up the phone and ask." How did beco

    • 1 hr 10 min
    410: Dustyn Kim - How To Stand Out & Speak Up

    410: Dustyn Kim - How To Stand Out & Speak Up

    Text LEARNERS to 44222 for more...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12 https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Dustyn Kim is the Chief Revenue Officer at Artsy. Artsy is used by art lovers and collectors to discover, learn about, and buy art. Prior to working at Artsy, Dustyn was a senior executive at LexisNexis. While at LexisNexis, she was my boss! She is a rare combination of highly respected, extremely well-liked, and typically the smartest person of every room she walks in. I loved working for her.
    Notes:
    Excellence = Authenticity and team building. "A leader should be focused on building great teams." What Dustyn learned from one of her favorite bosses, Kumsal Bayazit (the CEO of Elsevier) "She was inspiring and very human. Work and life go hand in hand." "When I got a senior leadership role, I didn't want a command and control organization." What she learned from Sebastian at Artsy: "He said to me, 'I advise, you decide.' That empowered me and gave me ownership of my decisions." It's critical to empower others What are must-have qualities in a leader? Empathy - EQ + IQ Communication skill - Set the vision and communicate that effectively to you team Collaboration - Lead through influence. Cross team collaboration is key to getting things done. How to collaborate better? "Map out the key people you need to know and understand their goals." Starting early: "When I was 15, my dad woke me up and told me he was taking me to Wall Street for my first internship." How to lead as a parent for you children? "I try to introduce them to as much as possible." "My job is to help you figure out what you love doing, but you have to show up and do the work." Advice for women leaders? "I don't love the advice from Sheryl Sandberg's "Lean In." It's really hard to have a full time job and travel a lot if you want to build a family. It's okay to slow down at times for your family. "Kumsal wanted me to go for a big promotion when I had just given birth to Mason. I didn't want to travel the world and be gone all the time. It's okay to not go for the big job all the time." Advice for new managers: Avoid the desire to micro manage Know that there are lots of different paths to success Don't expect to know everything A lot of new managers are too nice You need to give feedback How to be both respected and liked? Focus on the challenge at hand - "What's the plan? What's the goal?" "Then build the narrative and ask the team, what do you think?" "It didn't work for me to try and act like a guy. I had to be myself." Confidence is very important. That comes from being prepared and knowing your stuff. A tangible takeaway for how to find your voice in a meeting: "In meetings, when I was younger, I would turn bright red when speaking. A trick I had to implement was, 'say something very early in the meeting.' Just so that too much time passes without me saying anything." Career/Life Advice: Stand out -- Be excellent at your current role. Make sure others know they can count on you to do great work. Speak up -- Don't expect others to read your mind. TELL THEM what you want in your career. Make sure people know what you want to do. Give them the opportunity to help you get there... Have a goal, but be flexible on your path to achieving it

    • 58 min
    409: Adam Bryant - How To Conduct A World Class Interview

    409: Adam Bryant - How To Conduct A World Class Interview

    Text LEARNERS to 44222 for more...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12
    https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Adam Bryant interviewed more than 500 CEOs for “Corner Office,” a series on leadership that he created in 2009. Adam is the author of three books based on the themes that have emerged from his interviews and consulting work. His new book is THE CEO Test: Master the Challenges that Make or Break All Leaders.
    Notes:
    Interview style - Instead of asking them about strategies and industry trends, Adam focuses on timeless questions (how they were influenced by parents, lessons from early years in their careers, what they look for when making bets on people to invest in) about the important leadership lessons that CEOs had learned… Some questions he likes to ask: How do you hire? What questions do you ask? Describe yourself in one word... Work to get around the polished façade What animal would you be and why? Tony Hsieh would ask, "On a scale of 1-10, how weird are you?" Some additional interviewing tactics: The CEO has the interviewee drive his or her car. Monitors how they react in a different vehicle, in a new city Sharing meals "Put the mosaic of what a person is like as a human being" -- not just interviewing for a job The Dinner Party game: "If you could only ask a job candidate one question, what would you ask?" Learn about failure - Id you desire humility, learn about their failures, learnings, and lessons of life Ownership - The 3 most beautiful words: "I'm on it." Every employee needs to write a playbook to how they'd do the job... They need to take ownership. If you were an animal, what would you be? Adam: "A Hawk. Hover at high altitude, when they figure out what they want, they go get it." Question: What qualities of your parents do you like the most and the least? Ask that if you really want to go deep -- This forces the candidate to get real. "We're fooling ourselves if we think we can escape our parents." Process to ask questions: Think, "I want to cut a record with you." -- Have the desire to make something new with the person. His premise at the New York Times: "What if I sat down with CEOs and never asked them about their companies?" Questions: What were you like as a kid? What were your parents like? How have your parents impacted your leadership style? What drives you? "I like to see them in the moment of learning about themselves." "Eye contact is the 5 G of communication." Two tracking - Know where to go next AND listen intently Sustaining Excellence: Feedback look must be strong - They must be open to it Recognize patterns Take action Learn new things Be self-aware Be humble Need to ask, "What does this moment need?" "What is the gooey center of that candy?" A leader needs to know that about their business. Life advice: "Play in traffic." You have to get out there and meet people and do things. Build relationships. Those help with the pivot points of your career and life. Always be prepared to learn the most important lesson of your life...

    • 49 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
57 Ratings

57 Ratings

Britney45678 ,

Wow

I have listened to the John Mackey episode twice now and I’ll probably listen to it quite a few more times. This episode has made me realise the exact type of leader I want to be. I’ve just seen the review re the James Kerr episode, that is next on the list.

Ian Duthie ,

Brilliant lessons from Les Brown

Great story, packed full of lessons worth listening multiple time’s.

Ben J Phillips ,

The Best Leadership Podcast!

Ryan’s podcast is the best leadership podcast hands down. Each week his guests are informative and inspiring. Thoroughly recommend this podcast to both new and experienced students of leadership. Looking forward to your book mate.

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