10 episodes

Anderson Cooper takes us on a deeply personal exploration of loss and grief. He starts recording while packing up the apartment of his late mother Gloria Vanderbilt. Going through her journals and keepsakes, as well as things left behind by his father and brother, Cooper begins a series of emotional and moving conversations about the people we lose, the things they leave behind, and how to live on - with loss, with laughter, and with love. 

All There Is with Anderson Cooper CNN

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.8 • 727 Ratings

Anderson Cooper takes us on a deeply personal exploration of loss and grief. He starts recording while packing up the apartment of his late mother Gloria Vanderbilt. Going through her journals and keepsakes, as well as things left behind by his father and brother, Cooper begins a series of emotional and moving conversations about the people we lose, the things they leave behind, and how to live on - with loss, with laughter, and with love. 

    When Anderson Met Audie

    When Anderson Met Audie

    Anderson is pleased to present the first episode of Audie Cornish's new podcast: The Assignment... but first a conversation on the intimacy of podcasting with Audie and Anderson.Fiery Twitter threads and endless news notifications never capture the full story. Each week on The Assignment, host Audie Cornish pulls listeners out of their digital echo chambers to hear from the people who live the headlines. From the sex work economy to the battle over what’s taught in classrooms, no topic is off the table. You can find The Assignment wherever you get your podcasts.
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    • 46 min
    You Are Not Alone

    You Are Not Alone

    Anderson shares poignant and profound messages from listeners and reflects on the conversations he's had during the first season of the podcast.
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    • 45 min
    Live Your Beautiful Life, Baby

    Live Your Beautiful Life, Baby

    Writer and poet Elizabeth Alexander talks with Anderson about how she and her two children coped with the sudden death of her husband, Ficre, ten years ago, and the recent death of her father.
    To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

    • 41 min
    Laurie Anderson: The Release Of Love

    Laurie Anderson: The Release Of Love

    Artist and composer Laurie Anderson reflects on the death of her husband, rock legend Lou Reed and also her beloved dog Lolabelle. She talks with Anderson about grief and the unexpected feelings she has experienced surrounding loss.
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    • 42 min
    Anticipatory Grief

    Anticipatory Grief

    Filmmaker Kirsten Johnson lost her mother to Alzheimer's in 2007, now her father has dementia, and is disappearing before her eyes. As Kirsten struggles with grief over the inevitable loss of her father, she finds ways to celebrate his life and get closer to him. She tells Anderson it's never too late to get to know someone you love more deeply even after they are gone.
    To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

    • 41 min
    Molly Shannon’s Unspeakable Loss

    Molly Shannon’s Unspeakable Loss

    When Molly Shannon was four, her mother, baby sister and cousin were killed in a car crash. Her father was at the wheel. Growing up, few people ever spoke with her about her grief. She and Anderson explore how early loss shaped both their lives, and propelled them forward in unexpected ways.
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    • 31 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
727 Ratings

727 Ratings

Pgrogy ,

So very difficult

Your podcast is helping me get through my grief day by day. It’s two years since my sister died after having metastatic breast cancer that spread everywhere. In the end she said “ please, no more”. The medical team just wanted to keep trying , lastly to radiate her brain. She and I talked ….and she never knew she could say NO.
I still feel guilty , that I was the one who told her….she had that right.
Your podcast helps me to feel less guilty , but due to Covid, I could not be with her at the end. I feel lost, but it’s good to hear others do as well.
Thank you for all you do, so many people say you are a wonderful human being. Now I know why. Sincerely Pam.

Fanforlife1 ,

Making Grief intriguingly Beautiful

Working through my own grief, I found this podcast, not even knowing that it was about grief. Thankfully, life directs us to where we need to be.
One day, I cried so hard and deep, listening to these beautiful stories.
I’m a hospice nurse. I work daily with patient and families in their last moments. When grief hits your own life, it puts everything into perspective.
Thank you for this! Every guest, and You, Anderson, you’re helping so many, while providing lessons to help with the healing.
Much Love

pauladavisbucci ,

Grief

One mistake we make as human beings is believing we are ever without grief. Grief is often equated to the death of a loved one. And rightfully so, but we actually grieve so many things right from an early age.

My first experience with grief was as an army brat, having to leave people and places I loved almost every 4 years from the time I was born.
I said goodbye to many people I love, but no one was dying.
Then I met Craig. I was 19. He was a tall, blonde and handsome first year law student whose moodiness appeared “mysterious” and intriguing to me. Only a few months into a whirlwind relationship with me falling hard, but never knowing where I stood, and falling ever harder until one day, a full 180 and I was no longer with the guy I met 5 months prior.
Suddenly I was with a confused, insecure guy, who clung to me like a life jacket.
But I couldn’t save his life. I so wish I could have been that for him. It’s been 26 years though since he chose to take his life, and I still think about him every day.
Grief. It was relentless after that. My best friends father ended his life a few short months later. A friend in a tragic car accident. I met the wrong guy, divorced at 26. Met the right one, suffered 3 miscarriages. Lost my best friend in a rare surgery complication. The list goes on. How I’m here about to turn 47 is beyond my belief or comprehension, because I think I know those feelings Craig had when he teetered on the edge of making the choice. No one does that bravely. Or do they? Or is mental illness calling the shots by the time the impulsivity has finally found enough energy and courage to do it.
My parents are in their 70s, and I fear how long I have them for. I have three boys under 16 and I fear the same thing.
Grief once, no matter when or why and how, will change how you navigate your life. It’s my life’s driving force now, for good and for the absolute very worst. It’s hard to live life as we should when you’re waiting for the next grief.
Talking about it is what I find helps. Sadly I don’t have anyone to talk to about Craig who knew him, anymore.
But suicide, should be something that we talk about like we do the weather.
It’s not hard to ask someone if they feel like hurting themselves. I ask my friends, my colleagues and sons, my sons friends… I’m trying to make it normal in my world.
God bless you Anderson Cooper. Keep talking. People will listen to you. I’m just a teacher with 3 boys and no platform. Spread the word!

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