24 episodes

Journey deep into the heart of the world’s most remote jungles, savannas, tundras, mountains, and deserts with wildlife biologist Dr. Rae Wynn-Grant as she studies wild animals in their natural habitats. Rae and her teams spend years studying these animals – in order to protect their futures. Going Wild with Dr. Rae Wynn-Grant takes you inside their hidden worlds – and the action-packed, suspense-filled adventures of the wildlife conservationists who track them. Hear what it takes to find and save some of the world’s most intriguing and endangered creatures. 
Explore more at www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/podcasts/going-wild/

Going Wild with Dr. Rae Wynn-Grant PBS Nature

    • Science
    • 5.0 • 20 Ratings

Journey deep into the heart of the world’s most remote jungles, savannas, tundras, mountains, and deserts with wildlife biologist Dr. Rae Wynn-Grant as she studies wild animals in their natural habitats. Rae and her teams spend years studying these animals – in order to protect their futures. Going Wild with Dr. Rae Wynn-Grant takes you inside their hidden worlds – and the action-packed, suspense-filled adventures of the wildlife conservationists who track them. Hear what it takes to find and save some of the world’s most intriguing and endangered creatures. 
Explore more at www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/podcasts/going-wild/

    Women Who Travel Podcast: Hiking Patagonia, Life in ‘Cold Hawaii,’ and More

    Women Who Travel Podcast: Hiking Patagonia, Life in ‘Cold Hawaii,’ and More

    It's been a challenging couple of years during the pandemic but we are starting to travel again. Host Lale Arikoglu determines that she needs to challenge herself and goes hiking in Chilean Patagonia in a misty, rainy, and isolated landscape. Closer to home she’s trying to stay upright on a surfboard at New York’s Rockaway beach even though she’s skittish in waves and talks to author Dorthe Nors about moving from Copenhagen to live along the wild North Sea coast of Denmark, a place known as ‘Cold Hawaii’ and home to a longstanding community of international surfers. Plus, we hear from listeners who hike pilgrimage trails in the depths of winter and scale the Alps in the 95-degree summer heat.

    For more from Condé Nast Traveler's Women Who Travel, visit our website or subscribe to our email newsletter.
    For a transcript of this episode, please follow this link.

    • 29 min
    What Is the Most Successful Species on Earth? From NHPR: Outside/In

    What Is the Most Successful Species on Earth? From NHPR: Outside/In

    This week we're sharing a riveting episode from NHPR's show, Outside/In. Take a listen and let us know what you think!
    A debate about evolutionary “success.” Who should wear the crown of GSOAT (greatest species of all time), and are humans even in the running?
    Humans have had an impressive run thus far; we’ve explored most of the planet (the parts that aren’t underwater anyway), landed on the moon, created art and music, and made some pretty entertaining Tik-Toks.
    But we’ve survived on the planet for just a fraction of the time horseshoe crabs and alligators have. And we’re vastly outnumbered by many species of bacteria and insects.
    So who is the most successful species on Earth? And how do you measure that, anyway? From longevity to happiness, to sheer numbers, we put a handful of different organisms under the microscope in hopes of better understanding what exactly it means to succeed at life on a collective and individual scale.
    Featuring: Stephen Giovannoni, Rashidah Farid, and Steward Pickett

    • 31 min
    Together For Conservation: WCS Wild Audio Season 2 Premiere

    Together For Conservation: WCS Wild Audio Season 2 Premiere

    This week, we're sharing an episode from our friends at the Wildlife Conservation Society. Take a listen and let us know what you think!
    Their second season launches in conversation with Mariana Varese, the Peru-based director of WCS’s Amazon Landscapes Program. Mariana describes a new initiative, “Together for Conservation,” that seeks to conserve biodiversity while preventing environmental crime in the Amazon. The project brings Indigenous Peoples and local communities together with journalists, private companies, and civil society groups to develop conservation solutions that can be expanded or replicated across the Amazon.

    • 9 min
    Highs, Lows and Lowland Gorillas

    Highs, Lows and Lowland Gorillas

    *Content warning: this episode briefly mentions the topic of suicide.*
    From the kitchen floor to the remote jungles of the Congo, Rae grapples with divorce and single-motherhood on an international trip to study lowland gorillas.
    For the last episode of season 2, Dr. Rae Wynn-Grant talks about a career-changing opportunity to track down one of the most elusive creatures in Central Africa — lowland gorillas. But when things don’t go as planned, Rae ends up uncovering something else that changes the trajectory of her life.
    Since this is the last episode for this season, we want to thank all of our guests for sharing their amazing wild stories. And you, our dedicated listeners, for coming back for season 2. We’re so glad to have you on this journey with us! What would you like to see in the third season? Let us know at naturepod@wnet.org.
    Thanks for listening! If you want to support us, you can follow “Going Wild” on your favorite podcast-listening app. While you’re there, please leave us a review - it really helps. 
    You can also get updates and bonus content by following me, Dr. Rae Wynn-Grant, and PBS Nature on Instagram, TikTok, Twitter, and Facebook. And you can catch new episodes of Nature Wednesdays at 8/7c on PBS, pbs.org/nature and the PBS Video app.
    This episode of “Going Wild” was hosted by me, Dr. Rae Wynn-Grant. Production by Caroline Hadilaksono, Danielle Broza, Nathan Tobey, and Great Feeling Studios. Editing by Rachel Aronoff and Jakob Lewis. Sound design by Cariad Harmon. 
    Danielle Broza is the Digital Lead and Fred Kaufman is the Executive Producer for Nature. 
    Art for this podcast was created by Arianna Bollers and Karen Brazell. 
    Special thanks to Amanda Schmidt, Blanche Robertson, Jayne Lisi, Chelsey Saatkamp, and Karen Ho. 
    NATURE is an award-winning series created by The WNET Group and made possible by all of you. Funding for this podcast was provided by grants from the Anderson Family Fund, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and PBS.
    Views and opinions expressed during the podcast are those of the individuals expressing them and do not necessarily reflect those of THIRTEEN Productions LLC/The WNET Group.

    • 38 min
    A Chicken Saved My Life

    A Chicken Saved My Life

    Ornithologist (bird scientist), poet, and author Drew Lanham was recently awarded the Macarthur Genius Grant—$800,000 with no strings attached. But despite his deep love for birds he almost never studied the creatures at all. As a young man, he won a full-ride scholarship to any school he wanted, only this award did have strings attached. Drew would have to give up his dreams of ecology and instead be an engineer. Hear how Drew was saved first from a career he loathed by the lilting song of a prairie warbler and then how a chicken saved Drew from going into the military to be a pilot. Instead, it set him on the true path of his heart, to study the magical flying creatures we call birds.  
    Thanks for listening! If you want to support us, you can follow “Going Wild” on your favorite podcast listening app. While you’re there, please leave us a review - it really helps. 
    You can also get updates and bonus content by following me, Dr. Rae Wynn-Grant, and PBS Nature on Instagram, TikTok, Twitter, and Facebook. And you can catch new episodes of Nature Wednesdays at 8/7c on PBS, pbs.org/nature and the PBS Video app.
    Follow J. Drew Lanham on Twitter and Instagram and listen to more "Going Wild" HERE.
    This episode of “Going Wild” was hosted by me, Dr. Rae Wynn-Grant. Production by Caroline Hadilaksono, Danielle Broza, Nathan Tobey, and Great Feeling Studios. Editing by Rachel Aronoff and Jakob Lewis. Sound design by Cariad Harmon. 
    Danielle Broza is the Digital Lead and Fred Kaufman is the Executive Producer for Nature. 
    Art for this podcast was created by Arianna Bollers and Karen Brazell. 
    Special thanks to Amanda Schmidt, Blanche Robertson, Jayne Lisi, Chelsey Saatkamp, and Karen Ho. 
    NATURE is an award-winning series created by The WNET Group and made possible by all of you. Funding for this podcast was provided by grants from the Anderson Family Fund, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and PBS.
    Views and opinions expressed during the podcast are those of the individuals expressing them and do not necessarily reflect those of THIRTEEN Productions LLC/The WNET Group.

    • 27 min
    The Lizard Lassoer

    The Lizard Lassoer

    *Content warning: this episode contains descriptions of violence that might be disturbing to some listeners.*
    Herpetologists do a lot of unique things while studying lizards—cut their toes, pump their stomachs, and capture them by lassoing their necks. That one small word, “lasso,'' wasn't always the word used in the discipline. Herpetologist Earyn McGee, one of the few Black, female scientists in the field, proposed researchers stop using the word “noose” to describe capturing lizards, and start using a more accurate, less oppressive word, like “lasso.” 
    Thanks for listening! If you want to support us, you can follow “Going Wild” on your favorite podcast listening app. While you’re there, please leave us a review - it really helps. 
    You can also get updates and bonus content by following me, Dr. Rae Wynn-Grant, and PBS Nature on Instagram, TikTok, Twitter, and Facebook. And you can catch new episodes of Nature Wednesdays at 8/7c on PBS, pbs.org/nature and the PBS Video app.
    Follow Earyn McGee on Twitter and Instagram and listen to more "Going Wild" HERE.
    This episode of “Going Wild” was hosted by me, Dr. Rae Wynn-Grant. Production by Caroline Hadilaksono, Danielle Broza, Nathan Tobey, and Great Feeling Studios. Editing by Rachel Aronoff and Jakob Lewis. Sound design by Cariad Harmon. 
    Danielle Broza is the Digital Lead and Fred Kaufman is the Executive Producer for Nature. 
    Art for this podcast was created by Arianna Bollers and Karen Brazell. 
    Special thanks to Amanda Schmidt, Blanche Robertson, Jayne Lisi, Chelsey Saatkamp, and Karen Ho. 
    NATURE is an award-winning series created by The WNET Group and made possible by all of you. Funding for this podcast was provided by grants from the Anderson Family Fund, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and PBS.
    Views and opinions expressed during the podcast are those of the individuals expressing them and do not necessarily reflect those of THIRTEEN Productions LLC/The WNET Group.

    • 36 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
20 Ratings

20 Ratings

PureDaisy ,

Exciting and mind expanding

Dr Wynn-Grant humanizes scientists with vibrant stories about her work in the field and at home. I love that she’s honest and forthright about the challenges she’s faced as a black woman scientist, what she’s done to deal with them and what we could all be doing to get more diversity into ecological sciences.

Betsyis12 ,

Excellent podcast

Dr. Wynn-Grant has not only very interesting things to share about her career but also a natural flair for telling them. She’s warm, a gifted storyteller and really smart. I recommend this to anyone who enjoys podcasts about nature.

m4444$ ,

Listen!!

Great storytelling about interesting topics! Engaging and personal stories about different aspects of conservation biology.

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