66 episodes

A 30 minute radio show featuring one to two graduate students each week. This is an opportunity for our grad students to showcase their research to the Queen’s and Kingston community and how it affects us. From time to time we will also interview a post-doc or an alum or interview grad students in relation to something topical for the day. Grad Chat is a collaboration between the School of Graduate Studies and CFRC 101.9FM

Grad Chat - Queen's School of Graduate Studies CFRC.ca Podcast Network

    • Books

A 30 minute radio show featuring one to two graduate students each week. This is an opportunity for our grad students to showcase their research to the Queen’s and Kingston community and how it affects us. From time to time we will also interview a post-doc or an alum or interview grad students in relation to something topical for the day. Grad Chat is a collaboration between the School of Graduate Studies and CFRC 101.9FM

    Zuhaib Mir, MSc in Epidemiology, supervised by Dr Patti Groome

    Zuhaib Mir, MSc in Epidemiology, supervised by Dr Patti Groome

    Topic: Postoperative liver decompensation events following partial hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma among patients with cirrhosis







    Overview: My research is focused on studying adverse outcomes after surgical resection of liver tumours. Specifically, the majority of patients with liver cancer also have underlying liver disease, called cirrhosis. So, the decision to remove the cancerous portion of their liver must also take into account the function of the remaining liver left behind

    • 30 min
    Jennifer Ritonja, PhD in Epidemiology, supervised by Dr Kristan Aronson

    Jennifer Ritonja, PhD in Epidemiology, supervised by Dr Kristan Aronson

    Topic: Night shift work, melatonin, and circadian gene methylation in the development of breast cancer







    Overview: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in Canada and globally. Breast cancer etiology is complex, and work environment as a risk factor is still poorly understood, particularly with respect to night shift work. It is estimated that 10-30% of the global working population are night shift workers. While research indicates that night shift work raises the risk of breast cancer, not all research is consistent, due to differences across studies. Further, it is still unclear how night work may make an individual more susceptible to breast cancer.

    • 32 min
    Jackson Pind, PhD in Education, supervised by Dr Theodore Christou

    Jackson Pind, PhD in Education, supervised by Dr Theodore Christou

    Topic: The history of Indian Day Schools in Ontario between 1920-2000







    Overview: My research will conduct oral history Interviews with Indian Day School survivors by using Indigenous methods of data collection. I will then contextualize these histories with additional archival research conducted at the Library and Archives of Canada. This research will inform our understandings of Canada’s colonial educational system and provide a voice for survivors to share their stories that have yet to be documented in Ontario.

    • 34 min
    Sherri Dutton, PhD in Public Health Sciences, supervised by Dr Colleen Davison

    Sherri Dutton, PhD in Public Health Sciences, supervised by Dr Colleen Davison

    Topic: The use of arts-based methods in health research







    Overview: I will be talking about my Master’s work and what I intend to do with my PhD exploring the use of arts-based methods in health research and incorporating a collage activity into that research as well.

    • 32 min
    Morgan Lehtinen, PhD in Chemistry, supervised by Dr Guojun Liu

    Morgan Lehtinen, PhD in Chemistry, supervised by Dr Guojun Liu

    Topic: H2Only: Smart Filters for Efficient Oil/Water Separation.







    Overview: In a world that relies heavily on the use of crude oil as an energy source, clean oil recovery and spill remediation is of dire importance. Removing oil from surfactant stabilized oil-in-water emulsions has become an issue in numerous industries as current separation processes are tedious and wasteful of resources. Our research group has developed functionalized ‘smart’ filters that can selectively and efficiently separate the oil from oil-in-water emulsions.  I will discuss the environmental and operational advantages of this novel filter and its potential to improve the cleanliness of a normally dirty industry.

    • 36 min
    Keegan Turner-Wood, PhD in Biomedical & Molecular Sciences, supervised by Dr Steven Smith

    Keegan Turner-Wood, PhD in Biomedical & Molecular Sciences, supervised by Dr Steven Smith

    Topic: How to gain access to energy stored in plants by designing biological nanomachines which can efficiently release trapped energy.







    Overview: With the continued depletion of fossil fuels the search for new sources of renewable energy are growing ever more urgent. One possible source of energy is the vast repository of carbon found within plant biomass. We aim to gain access to this functionally limitless pool of energy by designing biological nanomachines which can efficiently release their trapped energy

    • 34 min

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