31 episodes

Matters of Engagement examines issues at the intersection of health, health care and society. Including: how people in Canada access and experience health care service delivery and distribution; how those experiences impact both individual and community health; and the multitude of environmental, systemic, and political factors that favour some and disadvantage many.

Jennifer Johannesen and Emily Nicholas Angl produce each episode with the aim of illuminating difficult or confounding issues, to provoke much-needed critical dialogue among all stakeholders.

Matters of Engagement mattersofengagement

    • Science
    • 4.8 • 5 Ratings

Matters of Engagement examines issues at the intersection of health, health care and society. Including: how people in Canada access and experience health care service delivery and distribution; how those experiences impact both individual and community health; and the multitude of environmental, systemic, and political factors that favour some and disadvantage many.

Jennifer Johannesen and Emily Nicholas Angl produce each episode with the aim of illuminating difficult or confounding issues, to provoke much-needed critical dialogue among all stakeholders.

    Health Policy Series Kick-off!: A retrospective look at public engagement, with Julia Abelson

    Health Policy Series Kick-off!: A retrospective look at public engagement, with Julia Abelson

    We're back! We're excited to get rolling on this new series on Health Policy!  We have a range of questions we want to explore, including: who is involved in making policy, and how are public needs identified? How is public engagement defined? And who is included or excluded?

    We're kicking off the series with a conversation with Julia Abelson. Julia is a professor at McMaster University in the Department of Health Evidence and Impact and an associate member in the Department of Political Science.  She has a special research interest in public engagement in health system governance, and the analysis of the determinants of health policy decision making.

    Julia's been on the podcast before (Evaluating Patient Engagement) and this time around, she's back to talk about the Public Engagement in Health Policy project, based at McMaster.

    We reconnected with Julia to chat about some of the early insights learned in the project so far. One of the research themes in the project is Looking Back, reflecting on the evolution of engagement practices and health policy and seeing what can be learned from past experiences.

    In this episode, Julia shares her insights related to trends in engagement in health policy, and also discusses one of the project's first outputs - a case survey of government-initiated public engagement in health policy.

    This series is supported by the Public Engagement in Health Policy project, which promotes research, critical reflection and dialogue about engagement issues that have a health and health policy focus. Learn more about this Future of Canada project at engagementinhealthpolicy.ca

    [download transcript]

    Guest links:

    Julia Abelson on twitter
    Julia Abelson at McMaster
    PPE Collaborative
    Previous episode with Julia

    Mentioned in this episode:

    Public Engagement in Health Policy Project 
    Trends in Public Engagement in Canadian Health Policy from 2000-2021: Results from a Comparative Descriptive Analysis
    The Future of Canada Project 

    • 27 min
    Onwards and upwards: Jen and Emily check in

    Onwards and upwards: Jen and Emily check in

    Just a quick check in to say hello and share what's next! 

    [download transcript]

    • 3 min
    Season 3 Finale: Patient Partner Reflections, brought to you by OSSU

    Season 3 Finale: Patient Partner Reflections, brought to you by OSSU

    For this final episode of Season 3, we want to acknowledge the Ontario SPOR SUPPORT Unit for supporting us to get this project off the ground and establish a solid foundation for critical dialogue about patient engagement and partnership. So we're turning things over to members of OSSU's Patient Partner Working Group: Annette McKinnon, Bilqis Williams, and honourary member, Stuart Nicholls. We invited them to share their thoughts on patient partnership today, and where they think it's heading.

    Stay tuned, more to come!!

    [download transcript]

    Guests:

    Annette McKinnon (linkedin, twitter)
    Bilqis Williams (linkedin, twitter, instagram)
    Stuart G. Nicholls (Ottawa Methods Centre, twitter)

    Mentioned in this episode:

    Ontario SPOR SUPPORT Unit
    Ottawa Methods Centre
    IC/ES
    Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research
    OMERACT
    Patient Advisors Network

    Additional music and production support provided by Angus Turney

    • 45 min
    Moral Distress in Engagement Professionals, with Mark Weir

    Moral Distress in Engagement Professionals, with Mark Weir

    Our guest Mark Weir is a seasoned engagement professional working in healthcare. Typically, engagement-related communities of practice tend to focus on things like best practices and 'how to' - not so much on the emotional toll it can take to fully engage in the work. In a recent IAP2 Canada workshop, Mark explored the effects of "moral distress", which he defines as feeling stuck and wanting to do the right thing but constrained due to systemic or institutional barriers - which are beyond the engagement professional's control. We spoke to Mark about the experience of carrying these kinds of burdens, which can go unseen or unacknowledged.


    Not only did we get to delve deeper into the experience of engagement work - this was also an opportunity to take a closer look at the context of engagement in general. What are some possible causes of this distress? And what does it say about the overall project of patient engagement? 


    In this episode, we hear from Mark about the challenges faced by engagement professionals (in healthcare) due to moral distress, and then later in the episode, we try to sort through some of the bigger, confounding questions that seem to follow us from episode to episode!


    [download transcript]


    Guest:


    Mark Weir, Director of Strategic Planning and Community Engagement, Woodstock Hospital (Ontario)
    Mark on twitter

    Mark's profile on LinkedIn





    Mentioned in this episode:


    Our previous episodes featuring engagement professionals:
    Expertise Part 2, with Francine Buchanan

    Evaluating Holland Bloorview’s Family Leadership Program, with Aman Sium 

    Lived Experience, with Katherine Dib and Katie Birnie of SKIP

    Walking a Tightrope: Inside the Engagement Professional Role, with Kelli Dilworth




    IAP2 Canada website

    First definition of moral distress in nursing - Jameton, A., Nursing Practice: The ethical issues. Prentice Hall Series in the Philosophy of Medicine, ed. G. S1984, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.

    Mark Weir's IAP2 Canada workshop slides - Weighing on Our Shoulders: Moral Distress and Compassion Fatigue in Engagement Professionals


    Additional music and production support provided by Angus Turney

    • 42 min
    Engagement in Context: Reflections from Jenn Broad and Paula Tookey of the South Riverdale Community Health Centre

    Engagement in Context: Reflections from Jenn Broad and Paula Tookey of the South Riverdale Community Health Centre

    Most of our episodes have been about engagement in institutional healthcare spaces - places like hospitals or research institutes. But of course, there are a multitude of other places where patient or service user engagement takes place. 


    Our guests are Jenn Broad and Paula Tookey. They work out of the South Riverdale Community Health Center in East Toronto. Jenn is the Program Manager of Harm Reduction and Hep C. And Paula is the Manager of Keep Six, a consumption and treatment service, which is a health service described as a place where people inject, snort, or orally consume pre-obtained drugs in a safe, hygienic and welcoming environment under the supervision of trained staff. 


    As you listen, we encourage you to tune in to their insights specific to engagement within a community that experiences persistent stigma and systemic discrimination. What we learned from talking to Jenn and Paula is that engagement in certain health related community services, like harm reduction programs, has different and possibly higher stakes for the people involved than what we typically think of as "patient engagement" in mainstream or organizational health services.


    [download transcript]


    Guests:


    Jenn Broad, Program Manager of Harm Reduction and Hep-C, South Riverdale Community Health Centre

    Paula Tookey, Manager of Keep Six Consumption and Treatment Service, South Riverdale Community Health Centre


    Mentioned in this episode:


    South Riverdale Community Health Centre

    From client to co-worker: a case study of the transition to peer work within a multi-disciplinary hepatitis c treatment team in Toronto, Canada

    • 27 min
    Discussing Failures in Participatory Research, with Lori Ross

    Discussing Failures in Participatory Research, with Lori Ross

    We initially invited Lori Ross on the podcast to discuss the PEERS  (Peers Examining Experiences in Research) Study - a 2 yr federally funded research project looking at the experiences of peer researchers with lived experience in communities that face structural oppression in Canada, including mental health service users, people who use drugs, trans and non-binary communities, and racialized communities.  Not only was the project team studying peer researchers, but they employed peer researchers (as research assistants) as well. 


    In our conversation, we discussed this research project, the findings of which are still to be written up. However, the conversation also revealed that the research team was concurrently studying what they saw as failures in the study while they were conducting the research, and that they plan to write up those reflections as well.


    We're excited to bring you this conversation with Lori Ross, the principal investigator, who shares with us some of the ins and outs of studying a process while simultaneously doing the work... and some of the project team's insights into why their participatory research project experienced failures. 


    Added to the experiential piece is their theoretical framing, which is sure to shed light on why participatory research conducted in the context of a large institution may indeed be "doomed to fail" when it comes to power sharing and other social justice aims.


    [download transcript]


    Guests:


    Lori Ross on twitter

    Lori Ross' profile (Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto)


    Mentioned in this episode:


    PEERS study web page

    • 41 min

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