54 episodes

Momus: The Podcast is a monthly arts and culture program hosted by Sky Goodden and Lauren Wetmore. Bringing Momus's unique insistence on criticality into a more conversational register, the podcast is dedicated to transparent conversations with an international cast of artists, curators, critics, and art writers.

Momus: The Podcast is in its 6th season and was named one of the top ten art podcasts by The New York Times in March 2020.

Subscribe on Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and wherever you get your podcasts.

If you would like to advertise on Momus: The Podcast, please contact Chris Andrews, Sales Director, at chrisandrews@momus.ca.

Momus: The Podcast Momus

    • Arts
    • 4.9 • 22 Ratings

Momus: The Podcast is a monthly arts and culture program hosted by Sky Goodden and Lauren Wetmore. Bringing Momus's unique insistence on criticality into a more conversational register, the podcast is dedicated to transparent conversations with an international cast of artists, curators, critics, and art writers.

Momus: The Podcast is in its 6th season and was named one of the top ten art podcasts by The New York Times in March 2020.

Subscribe on Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and wherever you get your podcasts.

If you would like to advertise on Momus: The Podcast, please contact Chris Andrews, Sales Director, at chrisandrews@momus.ca.

    Lara Khaldi – Season 6, Episode 8

    Lara Khaldi – Season 6, Episode 8

    Lara Khaldi is our final guest on Season 6 of Momus: The Podcast. A curator, artist, writer, and educator, Khaldi was born in Jerusalem, Palestine, and currently lives in Amsterdam, where she has been newly appointed as director of de Appel (https://www.deappel.nl/en/news/12827-lara-khaldi-is-de-nieuwe-artistiek-directeur-van-de-appel). In this episode, Khaldi speaks to Lauren Wetmore about the Palestinian American artist, activist, and scholar Samia A. Halaby's book “Liberation Art of Palestine: Palestinian Painting and Sculpture in the Second Half of the 20th Century” (H. T. T. B. Publications, 2001). Both Khaldi and Halaby assert that art is a critical part of the Palestinian struggle for liberation. Although representation may feel impossible in the context of the ongoing genocide in Gaza and the West Bank, Khaldi urges that "the least we can do is talk about it, because the more we speak, the truth is said."Thank you to Lara Khaldi for her contribution to the season.Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, with production assistance from Chris Andrews.Many thanks to this episode’s sponsors: the Sobey Art Awards (https://www.gallery.ca/whats-on/sobey-art-award) at the National Gallery of Canada (nominations close March 20th) and The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery. (https://www.thepowerplant.org/)

    • 54 min
    Nasrin Himada – Season 6, Episode 7

    Nasrin Himada – Season 6, Episode 7

    For the 50th (!) episode of Momus: The Podcast, Lauren Wetmore speaks to Nasrin Himada, a Palestinian curator and writer who is currently associate curator at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. "I write for my people. I write for Palestinians, and I write for the liberation of our lands," Himada says of their practice, which foregrounds "embodiment as method, desire as transformation, and liberation through many forms." Wetmore and Himada discuss esteemed Caribbean-Canadian poet and writer M. NourbeSe Philip's text, “Interview with an Empire'' (2003), thinking through how Philip teaches us to decontaminate language from imperialism so that it can "truly speak our truths." Himada touches on strategies, including artistic experimentation, collective action, and love.Thank you to Nasrin Himada for their contribution to the season.Many thanks to this episode’s sponsors: the Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery’s In/Tension podcast, and the Sobey Art Awards (https://www.gallery.ca/whats-on/sobey-art-award) at the National Gallery of Canada.

    • 59 min
    Jessica Lynne and Catherine G. Wagley – Season 6, Episode 6

    Jessica Lynne and Catherine G. Wagley – Season 6, Episode 6

    In this episode, Jessica Lynne speaks with Catherine G. Wagley about their shared love for Barbara Christian’s iconically confrontational essay, “The Race for Theory” (1987, Cultural Critique). Christian, a ground-laying literary academic who introduced writers like Toni Morrison and Alice Walker to the academe, goes toe to toe with her peers in this essay, rebuking the constraints and monolith of French theory and championing the approach of learning from the language of creative writers "as a way to discover what language I might use." In it, Christian both names and demonstrates the power of critique from within the institution, and its effective complement to calls for empowerment. And as Lynne and Wagley reflect on how criticism functions through a sense of curiosity and openness in both their practices, Lynne says, “it’s an intervening hand, right? Like, look at all these other planes that we could be living in. And, why not go there? Like, let's go there. In fact, we know writers who are already there. We know artists who are already there.”

    • 1 hr 9 min
    Kate Wolf - Season 6, Episode 5

    Kate Wolf - Season 6, Episode 5

    This episode features Kate Wolf, one of the founding editors of the Los Angeles Review of Books and a critic whose work has appeared in publications including The Nation, n+1, Art in America, and Frieze. Wolf is currently an Editor at Large of the LARB and a co-host and producer of its weekly radio show and podcast, The LARB Radio Hour. In conversation with Sky Goodden, Wolf discusses Reyner Banham's Los Angeles: The Architecture of Four Ecologies (1971) and what she took from it for her own writing practice: “There are many pleasures, as there are pains, but I think the pleasure of writing is unwinding an opinion, a point of view that’s latent inside of you and can become fully expressed. Especially in criticism,” Wolf adds, “the kind of closing mechanism that your brain sometimes furnishes for you where something becomes a story, both by grammar and by very minute plotting … this turn of the key in the door is immensely satisfying.” Thank you to Jacob Irish, our editor, and to Chris Andrews for assistant production.Many thanks to the National Gallery of Canada (https://www.gallery.ca/) and the Sobey Art Foundation (https://sobeyartfoundation.com/en/) for their support.

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Drew Kahuʻāina Broderick - Season 6, Episode 4

    Drew Kahuʻāina Broderick - Season 6, Episode 4

    Drew Kahuʻāina Broderick (https://drewbroderick.com/) (Kanaka ‘Ōiwi) joins Lauren Wetmore in conversation about Māhealani Dudoit’s fundamental text, “Carving a Hawaiian Aesthetic,” published in the first issue of ‘Ōiwi: A Native Hawaiian Journal – He ‘oia mau nō kākou’, which Dudoit co-founded in 1998. Broderick, an artist, curator, and educator from Mōkapu, Oʻahu, champions the text, saying “Kānaka ‘Ōiwi don’t have a lot of writing about our recent stories of art, so the few texts that do exist become more significant with time because they function as rare points of reference that we can all share when we’re reconstructing our own histories.” Broderick discusses challenges faced by Native Hawaiians around stories of their art within institutional settings and the role of writing in his own practice: “I’m an artist, but I have to write now because the work that I make, no matter how understood it is by the communities that I’m a part of, if it’s not written about it doesn’t really exist for a certain audience … Writing for me is a way to no longer have to waste time explaining what I already know.”On the occasion of this episode and especially following the fires in Hawaiʻi, we encourage listeners to visit the Puʻuhonua Society (http://www.puuhonua-society.org/) and consider making a donation.This episode has been generously supported by the Mellon Foundation.

    • 1 hr 7 min
    Sháńdíín Brown - Season 6, Episode 3

    Sháńdíín Brown - Season 6, Episode 3

    This episode features an interview with Sháńdíín Brown (Diné), continuing our series talking to participants in the Momus residency "Estuaries: An International Indigenous Art Criticism Residency (https://momus.ca/momus-emerging-critics-residency/)" co-hosted with Forge Project. Lauren Wetmore talks to Sháńdíín Brown, a citizen of the Navajo Nation and the first Henry Luce Curatorial Fellow for Native American Art at Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) Museum, about two very different texts written almost a century apart: Laura Tohe's "There is No Word for Feminism in My Language" (2000) and Uriah S. Hollister's "The Navajo and His Blanket" (1903). Brown speaks about these two texts in the context of the exhibition she has curated Diné Textiles: Nizhónígo Hadadít’eh (They Are Beautifully Dressed), which opens in early September at the RISD Museum. In highlighting the important role of women in Navajo culture, and Brown's own work as a facilitator of that culture, she speaks against racist writing about Indigenous art: "When someone so boldly says 'the Navajos are going to go extinct,'" Brown says of Hollister's text, "you're like, me being here, having Native people in museums, having Native people invited to be collaborators, and working in art history is a big deal."Diné Textiles: Nizhónígo Hadadít’eh (They Are Beautifully Dressed) curated by Sháńdíín Brown, will be on view from September 2nd, 2023 to September 29th, 2024.Thanks to our Editor, Jacob Irish; Assistant Producer, Chris Andrews; and many thanks to Gulf Coast Magazine's Toni Beauchamp Critical Art Writing Prize (https://www.uh.edu/class/giving/giving-news/toni-beauchamp-critical-art-writing-prize-announced/#:~:text=The%20Toni%20Beauchamp%20Prize%20recognizes,arts%20in%20Houston%20and%20Texas.) for their support.This episode has been generously supported by the Mellon Foundation.

    • 1 hr 7 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
22 Ratings

22 Ratings

Madsme ,

Engaging and Thought Provoking

This is the best of what podcasts can be: it feels like two friends gathering together for a cup of tea and they just happen to be passionate experts in their field. Their conversation is always elucidating and engaging while being accessible and enjoyable for a listener of any background.

ColeFlint ,

A passionate commitment to genius

Momus consistently delivers first-class art journalism and criticism

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