223 episodes

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. An award-winning podcast hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's.
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The Week in Art The Art Newspaper

    • Arts
    • 4.5 • 19 Ratings

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. An award-winning podcast hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Documenta 15: scandal and legacy. Plus, the Warhol-Prince copyright dispute, and Juan Muñoz

    Documenta 15: scandal and legacy. Plus, the Warhol-Prince copyright dispute, and Juan Muñoz

    This week: our associate editor, Kabir Jhala, and editor-at-large, Jane Morris, have been in Kassel, Germany, to see Documenta, the quinquennial international art exhibition. They review the show and respond to the escalation of a long-running row over antisemitism and broader racism, which has resulted in a work being removed from the exhibition. Virginia Rutledge, an art historian and lawyer, discusses the dispute over Andy Warhol’s appropriation of a photograph by Lynn Goldsmith of the pop icon Prince. The case will be heard in the US Supreme Court this autumn and has potentially huge implications for artistic freedom. And this episode’s Work of the Week is An Outpost of Progress (1992), a drawing by the late Spanish artist Juan Muñoz, inspired by Joseph Conrad’s short story of the same name.
    Documenta 15, Kassel, Germany, until 25 September.
    Juan Muñoz: Drawings 1982-2000, Centro Botín, Santander, Spain, 25 June-16 October.

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    • 1 hr 6 min
    Francis Bacon: Tate archive controversy; NY photographer Alice Austen; Michel Majerus in Basel

    Francis Bacon: Tate archive controversy; NY photographer Alice Austen; Michel Majerus in Basel

    This week: why is Tate rejecting an archive of material relating to Francis Bacon, 18 years after acquiring it? Our London correspondent Martin Bailey tells us about his recent scoop that Tate is returning a thousand documents and sketches said to have come from the studio of Francis Bacon to Barry Joule, a close friend of the artist, who donated them to Tate in 2004. We then discuss the material with Martin Harrison, the pre-eminent Bacon scholar and editor of the catalogue raisonné of Francis Bacon’s work published in 2016, and to Sophie Pretorius, the archivist at the Estate of Francis Bacon, who went through the Barry Joule archive item by item. Victoria Munro, the director of the Alice Austen House Museum in New York, discusses this still too-little-known photographer, and her documentation of immigration to the United States and the lives of queer women in the 19th and early 20th centuries. And this episode’s Work of the Week is Weißes Bild (1994), a painting by the late Luxembourg-born artist Michel Majerus, now on view at Art Basel—Aimee Dawson, acting digital editor, is at the fair and talks to Giovanni Carmine, curator of the Unlimited section, in which the painting appears.
    Sophie Pretorius’s essay Work on the Barry Joule Archive is in the book Francis Bacon: Shadows published by the Estate of Francis Bacon and Thames and Hudson. 
    For more on the Alice Austen House Museum, visit aliceausten.org. The podcast My Dear Alice is out in the autumn.
    Art Basel, until 19 June.


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    • 1 hr 8 min
    Crypto crash: what now for NFTs? Plus, Norway’s mega-museum and a Spanish-American screen

    Crypto crash: what now for NFTs? Plus, Norway’s mega-museum and a Spanish-American screen

    We talk to the writer and critic Amy Castor about what effect the tumbling crypto markets might have on the until-now booming world of non-fungible tokens or NFTs. As Norway’s vast new National Museum opens, we speak to its director Karin Hindsbo. And this episode’s Work of the Week is Folding Screen with Indian Wedding, Mitote, and Flying Pole, made in Mexico in the late 17th century. It is one of the major pieces in a new show at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, called Archive of the World: Art and Imagination in Spanish America, 1500–1800. Ilona Katzew, the curator of the exhibition, talks in depth about the meanings and purpose of the work.
    You can read Amy Castor’s thoughts on crypto and NFTs at amycastor.com.
    The National Museum in Oslo opens on 11 June.
    Archive of the World: Art and Imagination in Spanish America, 1500–1800, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 12 June-30 October.

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    • 52 min
    Picasso and the Old Masters; the Queen by Chris Levine; political interference in museums

    Picasso and the Old Masters; the Queen by Chris Levine; political interference in museums

    This week, Picasso and the Old Masters: as shows pairing the Spaniard with Ingres and El Greco open in London and Basel respectively, Ben Luke talks to Christopher Riopelle (curator of Picasso Ingres: Face to Face at the National Gallery) and Carmen Giménez (curator of Picasso-El Greco at the Kunstmuseum in Basel) about the profound influence of historic artists on Picasso’s rupturing of tradition. In this episode’s Work of the Week, The Art Newspaper’s contemporary art correspondent, Louisa Buck, talks to Chris Levine, the creator of Lightness of Being, one of the best known recent portraits of Queen Elizabeth II, as the British monarch celebrates 70 years on the throne. And as the Polish government replaces yet another museum director, what can be done about political interference in museum governance? Ben talks to Goranka Horjan, director of Intercom, the International Committee for Museum Management, and Bart De Baere, chair of the Museum Watch programme at the International Committee for Museums and Collections of Modern Art (Cimam).
    Picasso Ingres: Face to Face, National Gallery, London, until 9 October. Picasso-El Greco, Kunstmuseum, Basel, 11 June-25 September.
    You can read the Museum Watch report at cimam.org.

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    • 1 hr 2 min
    The hunt for looted Cambodian heritage; the dark truth of the Marcos family’s extravagance; Ruth Asawa

    The hunt for looted Cambodian heritage; the dark truth of the Marcos family’s extravagance; Ruth Asawa

    This week: are stolen Cambodian statues hidden in the world’s great public collections? We discuss Cambodia’s looted heritage with Celia Hatton, Asia Pacific editor and presenter at the BBC World Service, whose documentary for BBC TV and radio Cambodia: Returning the Gods exposes the connections between looters, smugglers and, allegedly, some of the world’s most famous encyclopaedic museums. Plus, the dark truth behind the art and antiques assembled by the Marcos family in the Philippines as they return to power. We talk to the Filipino artist Pio Abad—who’s made art about Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos and their collections for more than a decade—about Bongbong Marcos’s presidential election victory in the Philippines and what that means for the country and the art and antiquities seized by its government after the Marcoses were deposed in the 1980s. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, we discuss a sculpture by Ruth Asawa—Untitled (S.266, Hanging Seven-Lobed, Multi-Layered Interlocking Continuous Form within a Form) (1961)—a highlight of a new exhibition at Modern Art Oxford in the UK, with Emma Ridgway, the show’s co-curator. Remarkably, the solo exhibition is the first in a European institution dedicated to the Japanese-American artist.
    You can read Celia’s report on Cambodian antiquities online at bbc.co.uk. Cambodia: Returning the Gods (radio version) is on the BBC website and the BBC Sounds app—under The Documentary Podcast stream for the World Service and the Crossing Continents podcast stream in the UK—and on other podcast platforms.
    Cambodia: Returning the Gods (television version) is on iPlayer in the UK and will be shown again on the BBC World news channel, broadcast date tbc—check listings.Pio Abad: Fear of Freedom Makes Us See Ghosts, Ateneo Art Gallery, Ateneo de Manila University, until 30 July, pioabad.com.
    Ruth Asawa: Citizen of the Universe, Modern Art Oxford, UK, 28 May-21 August; Stavanger Art Museum, Norway, 1 October-22 January 2023.

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    • 1 hr 9 min
    New York: Frieze and auction bonanza. Plus, the Albers Foundation in Senegal, and a golden Indian manuscript

    New York: Frieze and auction bonanza. Plus, the Albers Foundation in Senegal, and a golden Indian manuscript

    This week, as Frieze New York takes place at The Shed in Hudson Yards, and we come to the end of two weeks of huge auction sales, we talk to The Art Newspaper’s editor in the Americas, Ben Sutton, about the New York market. Nicholas Fox Weber, the executive director of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, tells us about Bët-bi, a new museum the foundation hopes to open in Senegal in 2025, with a building designed by Mariam Issoufou Kamara, the Niger-based architect. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, Annabel Gallop, one of the co-curators of Gold, a new exhibition at the British Library in London, discusses a shimmering golden farman, or decree, from Shah ’Alam II, issued to a British woman, Sophia Plowden, in India in 1789.
    Frieze New York, The Shed, New York, until 22 May.
    Bët-bi, near Kaolack, Senegal, opens in 2025, www.betbi.org, www.ateliermasomi.com.
    Gold is at the British Library in London until 2 October.

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    • 1 hr

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
19 Ratings

19 Ratings

Alex MdeM ,

Best for art

The best art podcast out there. Ben Luke is a brilliant host and the topics are always relevant and stimulating. Plus cool music.

SukiyakiPartDeux ,

Top quality art history, market, and exhibitions

Great hosting and interviewing by Ben Luke, whose lucid commentary makes me feel I’m sipping fine wine and having a conversation in front of a painting, instead of driving my car. Interesting topics crossing art history and contemporary, exhibitions and the art market.

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