114 episodes

Greg is a sought-after speaker. Having faced many of the trials and tribulations facing the small business owner, Greg offers his audiences and clients practical actionable ideas to improve their organizations and ultimately get more “life” out of their business.

Small Business Minute Greg Weatherdon

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Greg is a sought-after speaker. Having faced many of the trials and tribulations facing the small business owner, Greg offers his audiences and clients practical actionable ideas to improve their organizations and ultimately get more “life” out of their business.

    SBM #114 Do you lead from the front or the back?

    SBM #114 Do you lead from the front or the back?

    In this episode, we explore when you should lead from the front or step back and lead from the back to keep your team motivated.

    • 7 min
    SBM #113 Two Kinds of Entrepreneurs

    SBM #113 Two Kinds of Entrepreneurs

    Finding a trustworthy supplier can be challenging. Following these 8 steps can help reduce the risk and increase your success.

    • 7 min
    SBM #112 Putting Lipstick on a pig

    SBM #112 Putting Lipstick on a pig

    I actually starting this piece 3 or 4 years ago, pre-Covid days. And as often happens when trying to be creative, you can be hit with a case of writer’s block that can leave any number of incomplete topics to collect dust. In my case, I can have upwards of a dozen or so pieces just sitting on the sidelines at any point in time. So was the case with this piece.

    The reason I mention pre-Covid days is because many businesses are still facing challenges as they recover, however my original observation about customer experience were prior to Covid and yet still exist today.



    Putting lipstick on a pigThe phrase to put "lipstick on a pig" means making superficial or cosmetic changes to a product in a futile effort to disguise its fundamental failings. {Wikipedia} Many businesses, both small and large, condone this kind of behaviour.On a recent road trip south, we stayed in a number of hotels. Like many, when heading to a specific destination we tend to stay in mid range establishments that we book at some point during our day. Booking any farther ahead is pointless as we never know how far we’ll drive on any given day because of weather or traffic.These establishment are well known chains, from Holiday Inn Express to Hampton Inns, to name a few. Fancy, no! But usually more than satisfactory for a quick overnight stop and they’re usually situated right near major highway exits. So easy off, easy on. In most cases they’re reasonably priced and provide a free breakfast. All in all, a good value proposition. Most of the time.The following are just a few of the observations I made during our stays at various establishments. Poorly trained and uncaring staffBurnt out light bulbs in room.Inoperative power ports or outlets in room.Significant marks on wall and ceiling in room.Peeling wallpaper in hallways.Worn and scratched stain on bathroom door.Poorly applied caulking around tub.













     I ain’t buying the placeIndividually, none of these shortcomings are a deal breaker and can be easily overlooked when just staying one night. As I like to say, “I ain’t buying the place” and for the most part the rooms and establishment were clean. But they tarnish the customer experience. The point I’m trying to make with these observations is, when something such as a hotel room is serviced every single day, how do any of these items get overlooked? In one hotel we stayed in they were in the process of completely renovating the front lobby and the breakfast area. Yet, this is the same place where the wallpaper in the hallways was pealing and light bulbs in the room were burnt out. To my way of thinking they kind of got this back asswards.I always wonder whose decision it is to invest tens of thousands of dollars in refurbishing the lobby when the rest of the establishment is in dire need of some loving. Especially when these items can be rectified at little or no cost. It’s akin to putting lipstick on a pig and again does little to improve the customer experience. Considering that these places are designed for travellers who typically spend more time in their rooms than in the lobby as they rest up for their next driving day. When you think about it, once checked in, most guests spend their time in the room as they rest up for the next day of driving. So, wouldn’t think room maintenance would be a priority? Just saying!To be sure 1st impressions are important and major renovations are part of the hospitality industry. As franchisees, they have requirements to update their facilities to new standards set out by the franchisor.Out of syncBut many small businesses operate the same way. They are more concerned about their outward appearance, which I maintain is an absolute must, but useless if the behind the scenes operations are totally out of sync with that image.

    • 9 min
    SBM #111 Practical Innovation

    SBM #111 Practical Innovation

    Don't confuse innovation with invention. Simply put innovation is improving something whereas invention is something new. Innovation should improve customer experience.

    • 7 min
    SBM #110- Recession- Play Offense or Defense

    SBM #110- Recession- Play Offense or Defense

    So what is a small business owner to do? Well, you have two choices, play defense, and batten down the hatches or go on the offense and grab market share.

    • 6 min
    SBM #109 The Accidental Solopreneur

    SBM #109 The Accidental Solopreneur

    My guest today is Dennis Geelen and is here to talk about his new book The Accidental Solopreneur and how it can help any consultant achieve greater success

    • 14 min

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