416 episodes

Wanna see a trick? Give us any topic and we can tie it back to the economy. At Planet Money, we explore the forces that shape our lives and bring you along for the ride. Don't just understand the economy – understand the world.Wanna go deeper? Subscribe to Planet Money+ and get sponsor-free episodes of Planet Money, The Indicator, and Planet Money Summer School. Plus access to bonus content. It's a new way to support the show you love. Learn more at plus.npr.org/planetmoney

Planet Money Planet Money

    • Business
    • 4.7 • 2.7K Ratings

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

Wanna see a trick? Give us any topic and we can tie it back to the economy. At Planet Money, we explore the forces that shape our lives and bring you along for the ride. Don't just understand the economy – understand the world.Wanna go deeper? Subscribe to Planet Money+ and get sponsor-free episodes of Planet Money, The Indicator, and Planet Money Summer School. Plus access to bonus content. It's a new way to support the show you love. Learn more at plus.npr.org/planetmoney

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    So you've been scammed, now what?

    So you've been scammed, now what?

    We are living in a kind of golden age for online fraudsters. As the number of apps and services for storing and sending money has exploded – so too have the schemes that bad actors have cooked up to steal that money. Every year, we hear more and more stories of financial heartbreak. What you don't often hear about is what happens after the scam?

    On today's show, we follow one woman who was scammed out of over $800,000 on her quest to get her money back. That journey takes her from the halls of the FBI to the fraud departments of some of the country's biggest financial institutions. And it offers a window into how the systems that are theoretically designed to help the victims of financial cybercrime actually work in practice.

    This episode was hosted by Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi and Jeff Guo. It was produced by Willa Rubin and edited by Keith Romer. It was engineered by Neal Rauch and fact-checked by Sierra Juarez. Alex Goldmark is Planet Money's executive producer.

    Help support Planet Money and hear our bonus episodes by subscribing to Planet Money+ in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org/planetmoney.

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    • 27 min
    Joseph Stiglitz on 'progressive capitalism' and redefining 'freedom' (PM+)

    Joseph Stiglitz on 'progressive capitalism' and redefining 'freedom' (PM+)

    For a long time, some politicians have sold lower taxes, fewer regulations, and smaller government as integral to enhancing freedom. Nobel-prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz, in a new book, opposes that view and argues it's paved the way to a dangerous political era. In this bonus episode, Stiglitz shares his vision of "freedom" and of government playing a more active role in the economy. It's another edition of Behind The Newsletter, where Greg Rosalsky shares his interviews with policy makers and economists who appear in the Planet Money newsletter.You can sign up for the The Planet Money Newsletter and check out past editions here:https://www.npr.org/planetmoneynewsletterShow your support for Planet Money and the reporting we do by subscribing to Planet Money+ in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. You'll be able to unlock this episode and other great bonus content. Regular episodes remain free to listen!Email the show at planetmoney@npr.org.

    The junkyard economist

    The junkyard economist

    On today's episode, we ride through the streets of San Francisco with a long-time junkman, Jon Rolston.

    Jon has spent the last two decades clearing out houses and offices of their junk. He's found all sorts of items: a life-time supply of toilet paper, gold rings, $20,000 in cash. Over the years, he's developed a keen eye for what has value and what might sell. He's become a kind of trash savant.

    As we ride with Jon, he shows us the whole ecosystem of how our reusable trash gets dealt with — from metals (ferrous and non-ferrous) to tires to cardboard. And we see how our junk can sometimes get a second chance at life.

    If you can understand the junk market like Jon, you can understand dozens of trends in our economy.

    This episode was hosted by Erika Beras and James Sneed, and produced by James Sneed with help from Emma Peaslee. It was edited by Jess Jiang. Engineering by Josh Newell. It was fact-checked by Sierra Juarez. Alex Goldmark is Planet Money's executive producer.

    Help support Planet Money and hear our bonus episodes by subscribing to Planet Money+ in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org/planetmoney.

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    • 25 min
    Anatomy of a layoff

    Anatomy of a layoff

    By one estimate, 40 percent of American workers get laid off at least once in their careers. And when that happens, companies will often say, "It's not personal. It has nothing to do with you or your performance. We're just changing priorities, making a strategic shift."

    It's like the business version of: "It's not you, it's me." And just like a breakup, it feels terrible.

    This happened to a man we're calling V, who was working at the same company as his husband when he got laid off. And for V, the experience felt shocking. It left him and his husband with a lot of unresolved questions.

    On today's show, the story of that layoff. And we help that couple get some answers by taking their questions to an HR expert who gives the low-down on lay-offs.

    This story is adapted from a 3-part series on layoffs produced by Yowei Shaw for her show, Proxy. The layoff series was edited by John DeLore with research and reporting help from Kim Nederveen Pieterse. You can listen to the full layoff series from Proxy wherever you get your podcasts, and you can support the show and find out more by going to patreon.com/proxypodcast. And you can check out her original song "Gold Star" on Spotify and YouTube.

    Help support Planet Money and hear our bonus episodes by subscribing to Planet Money+ in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org/planetmoney.

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    • 27 min
    The hack that almost broke the internet

    The hack that almost broke the internet

    Last month, the world narrowly avoided a cyberattack of stunning ambition. The targets were some of the most important computers on the planet. Computers that power the internet. Computers used by banks and airlines and even the military.

    What these computers had in common was that they all relied on open source software.

    A strange fact about modern life is that most of the computers responsible for it are running open source software. That is, software mostly written by unpaid, sometimes even anonymous volunteers. Some crucial open source programs are managed by just a single overworked programmer. And as the world learned last month, these programs can become attractive targets for hackers.

    In this case, the hackers had infiltrated a popular open source program called XZ. Slowly, over the course of two years, they transformed XZ into a secret backdoor. And if they hadn't been caught, they could have taken control of large swaths of the internet.

    On today's show, we get the story behind the XZ hack and what made it possible. How the hackers took advantage of the strange way we make modern software. And what that tells us about the economics of one of the most important industries in the world. Help support Planet Money and hear our bonus episodes by subscribing to Planet Money+ in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org/planetmoney.

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    • 25 min
    Why Gold? (Classic)

    Why Gold? (Classic)

    In the past few months, the price of gold has gone way up – even hitting a new high last month at just over $2,400 per troy ounce.

    Gold has long had a shiny quality to it, literally and in the marketplace. And we wondered, why is that?

    Today on the show, we revisit a Planet Money classic episode: Why Gold? Jacob Goldstein and David Kestenbaum will peruse the periodic table of the elements with one goal in mind: to learn which element would really make the best money.

    This classic Planet Money episode was part of the Planet Money Buys Gold series, and was hosted by Jacob Goldstein and David Kestenbaum.

    This rerun was hosted by Sally Helm, produced by Willa Rubin, edited by Keith Romer, and fact-checked by Sierra Juarez. Alex Goldmark is our executive producer.

    Help support Planet Money and hear our bonus episodes by subscribing to Planet Money+ in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org/planetmoney.

    Always free at these links: Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, the NPR app or anywhere you get podcasts.

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    • 18 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
2.7K Ratings

2.7K Ratings

Alixe53 ,

Christmas Tree episode 2020 (re post)

I first listened to your Christmas tree podcast on 24 December this year. Henceforth, this episode is right up there with “A Charlie Brown Christmas and will be enjoyed annually. I laughed, I smiled and I got a little lump in the throat. Thank you for making this day a little less lonely and a lot more twinkly. Alixe in Toronto, Canada

Drod_the_mach ,

Interesting information, no knowledge of economics and money

I listened to a handful of episodes after I heard about it in another podcast.
The views expressed here are contrarian to my opinion about money, that is what deove me to listen to more episodes. After listening more, this team dont know anything about money and economics; they highly disregards the way free market capitalism works.
Take a look at free to choose series by milton freeman or thomas sowelI books before you take any of this information at face value.

JN999podlove ,

Great for the non-economist

Love learning more in-depth but still lighthearted about money topics that impact the world around me in right-sized episodes. Thanks to the team!

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