773 episodes

Freakonomics co-author Stephen J. Dubner uncovers the hidden side of everything. Why is it safer to fly in an airplane than drive a car? How do we decide whom to marry? Why is the media so full of bad news? Also: things you never knew you wanted to know about wolves, bananas, pollution, search engines, and the quirks of human behavior.

Join the Freakonomics Radio Plus membership program for weekly member-only episodes of Freakonomics Radio. You’ll also get every show in our network without ads. To sign up, visit our show page on Apple Podcasts or go to freakonomics.com/plus.

Freakonomics Radio Freakonomics Radio

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.6 • 3.4K Ratings

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

Freakonomics co-author Stephen J. Dubner uncovers the hidden side of everything. Why is it safer to fly in an airplane than drive a car? How do we decide whom to marry? Why is the media so full of bad news? Also: things you never knew you wanted to know about wolves, bananas, pollution, search engines, and the quirks of human behavior.

Join the Freakonomics Radio Plus membership program for weekly member-only episodes of Freakonomics Radio. You’ll also get every show in our network without ads. To sign up, visit our show page on Apple Podcasts or go to freakonomics.com/plus.

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    584. How to Pave the Road to Hell

    584. How to Pave the Road to Hell

    So you want to help people? That’s great — but beware the law of unintended consequences. Three stories from the modern workplace.

    • 43 min
    Extra: The Men Who Started a Thinking Revolution (Update)

    Extra: The Men Who Started a Thinking Revolution (Update)

    The psychologist Daniel Kahneman — a Nobel laureate and the author of “Thinking, Fast and Slow” — recently died at age 90. Along with his collaborator Amos Tversky, he changed how we all think about decision-making. The journalist Michael Lewis told the Kahneman-Tversky story in a 2016 book called "The Undoing Project." In this episode, Lewis explains why they had such a profound influence.

    • 34 min
    Extra: The Men Who Started a Thinking Revolution (Update)

    Extra: The Men Who Started a Thinking Revolution (Update)

    The psychologist Daniel Kahneman — a Nobel laureate and the author of “Thinking, Fast and Slow” — recently died at age 90. Along with his collaborator Amos Tversky, he changed how we all think about decision-making. The journalist Michael Lewis told the Kahneman-Tversky story in a 2016 book called "The Undoing Project." In this episode, Lewis explains why they had such a profound influence.

    Why Are There So Many Bad Bosses? (Update)

    Why Are There So Many Bad Bosses? (Update)

    People who are good at their jobs routinely get promoted into bigger jobs they’re bad at. We explain why firms keep producing incompetent managers — and why that’s unlikely to change.

    • 49 min
    583. Are We Living Through the Most Revolutionary Period in History?

    583. Are We Living Through the Most Revolutionary Period in History?

    Fareed Zakaria says yes. But it’s not just political revolution — it’s economic, technological, even emotional. He doesn’t offer easy solutions but he does offer some hope.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Extra: How Much Do You Know About Immigration?

    Extra: How Much Do You Know About Immigration?

    The political debates over immigration can generate a lot of fuzzy facts. We wanted to test Americans’ knowledge — so, to wrap up our special series on immigration, we called some Freakonomics Radio listeners and quizzed them.

    • 27 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
3.4K Ratings

3.4K Ratings

sharms18 ,

Freak ya!

Love this podcast, I wish I could be friends with Stephen!

Anonymous 919 ,

Richard Feynman takes a trip 🍄

I would change time & place to be with Richard Feynman at this time in my life. To be, to hear his voice, to cure his cancer, to take pain & suffering from him. There a few scientists I admire more. I truly hold many professors with little to no esteem after 13 years at University but the idea of Mr. Feynman's life & profession brings me joy and hope. He was luminous & had a beautiful mind. He was a spark that ignited human potential. Humanity could benefit from a presence like his during these troubling times of evil with Trump, Putin, the Republican Party, & other manifestations blacking out what is fine & good in this world.

Jack® ,

So Informative

Everything I used to know about Richard Feynman was what I learned on The Big Bang Theory (much like my early opera education was based on Bugs Bunny). Thank you for this series which was so informative, but also touching and sensitive. I can understand why his friend wells up when talking about him. I studied history (the opposite of physics) in university but the courses where I learned the most was where the professors were passionate about their subjects. We can see here how Professor Feynman was clearly passionate about studying and teaching and life in general. Thank you again.

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

Stuff You Should Know
iHeartPodcasts
Québec Nostalgie : le podcast
Québec Nostalgie
The Poison Detectives
Canada's National Observer
Inconceivable Truth
Wavland
Roz & Mocha
Frequency Podcast Network
What Now? with Trevor Noah
Spotify Studios

You Might Also Like

People I (Mostly) Admire
Freakonomics Radio + Stitcher
The Economics of Everyday Things
Freakonomics Network & Zachary Crockett
No Stupid Questions
Freakonomics Radio + Stitcher
Planet Money
NPR
Freakonomics, M.D.
Freakonomics Radio + Stitcher
Hidden Brain
Hidden Brain, Shankar Vedantam

More by Stitcher

LeVar Burton Reads
LeVar Burton and Stitcher
No Stupid Questions
Freakonomics Radio + Stitcher
The Sporkful
Dan Pashman and Stitcher
Literally! With Rob Lowe
Stitcher & Team Coco, Rob Lowe
The Atlas Obscura Podcast
Stitcher Studios & Atlas Obscura
People I (Mostly) Admire
Freakonomics Radio + Stitcher