1,044 episodes

Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.
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The Intelligence from The Economist The Economist

    • News
    • 4.7 • 446 Ratings

Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Bibi’s gambit: Israel’s government v its judiciary

    Bibi’s gambit: Israel’s government v its judiciary

    Israel’s right-wing coalition government has the country’s supreme court in its sights. Their proposal to effectively subjugate its independence to the legislature has sparked protests and stirred concern for the country’s democracy. Our correspondent reports from a newly reopened Shanghai. And how gas stoves became the latest battleground in America’s endless culture wars.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer


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    • 26 min
    Tanks, a lot: arming Ukraine

    Tanks, a lot: arming Ukraine

    After months of foot-dragging, Germany is sending tanks to Ukraine, with America poised to follow suit. We examine how that could reshape the battlefield. Why Sudan’s democratic transition has stalled and its economy is struggling. And we reveal the secret to perfectly cooked chips.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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    • 24 min
    Marshalling resources: rebuilding Ukraine

    Marshalling resources: rebuilding Ukraine

    Around one-fifth of Ukraine’s population has fled. The country’s GDP has plummeted and foreign investors are staying away. Even as the fighting rages, the world has already begun thinking about how to rebuild the country. How a 36-year-old treaty helped heal the ozone layer. And why the pandemic did not lead to a wave of job-killing automation.
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    • 26 min
    Feeling un-Wellington

    Feeling un-Wellington

    Jacinda Ardern resigned as New Zealand’s prime minister last week. As Chris Hipkins prepares to take over, we reflect on Ms Ardern’s legacy, and look at the challenges her successor inherits. What the world’s plethora of grandparents means for families. And which issues currently motivate America’s far-right.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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    • 26 min
    A rarefied air: a dispatch from Davos

    A rarefied air: a dispatch from Davos

    The global elite’s annual Alpine jamboree may have lost some of its convening power, our editor-in-chief says, but the many encounters it enables still have enormous value. Our correspondent considers what the closing of Noma, a legendary Danish restaurant, means for the world of fine dining. And remembering Adolfo Kaminsky, whose expertly forged documents saved thousands of Jews’ lives. 
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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    • 27 min
    Turkey stuffed? A democracy’s last stand

    Turkey stuffed? A democracy’s last stand

    President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has dismantled the country’s institutions. As an election looms we ask what democratic guardrails remain, and examine the wider risks if those go, too. “Non-compete” clauses designed to protect trade secrets when employees depart are being abused—and trustbusters are going after them. And Ryuichi Sakamoto, a famed Japanese composer, reckons with mortality in his latest release.
    Music from “12” courtesy of Milan Records.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 23 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
446 Ratings

446 Ratings

srcriber ,

Great morning news start up

A good survey and explainer of world news. The occasional moving obituary and interesting incidental knowledge. Also a shout out to whoever does the sound design which is excellent.

esotericdaniel ,

Forget the Daily

I mean, you can still listen to the Daily but the Intelligence is just better: a lot smarter, more diverse perspectives. You will learn something instead of being told what to think.

rtown ,

‘Deus ex Manchina’

Sometimes you just have to hand it to The Economist for incredible episode and article titles like ‘Deus ex Manchina’ for perfectly describing the sudden change of heart of U.S. Sen. Manchin to support certain climate legislation. A real plot twist that feels like it was ‘god out of the Manchin’!

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