48 episodes

Dr. Bridget Nash created Therapy Show in order to demystify mental health treatment by interviewing the top experts in the field using easy to understand language. Therapy Show can help you determine which evidence-based therapy is right for you and how you can find a psychotherapist or physician trained in that therapy to guide your treatment.

Therapy Show Host Dr. Bridget Nash

    • Mental Health
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

Dr. Bridget Nash created Therapy Show in order to demystify mental health treatment by interviewing the top experts in the field using easy to understand language. Therapy Show can help you determine which evidence-based therapy is right for you and how you can find a psychotherapist or physician trained in that therapy to guide your treatment.

    #48 Parallel Process in Social Work Supervision. Dr. Lawrence Shulman Interview

    #48 Parallel Process in Social Work Supervision. Dr. Lawrence Shulman Interview

    Dr. Lawrence Shulman is Professor Emeritus and former Dean of the University at Buffalo’s School of Social Work.  As a social work practitioner-educator for more than 40 years, Dr. Shulman has done extensive research on the core helping skills that are used in social work practice, child welfare, school violence and supervision best practices. Dr. Shulman is the co-founder and co-chair of the International and Interdisciplinary Conference on Clinical Supervision sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Haworth Press. Recognized for his dedication to excellence in scholarship and research, pedagogy and curriculum development, and organizational leadership, Dr. Shulman is a recipient of the 2014 Significant Lifetime Achievement in Social Work Education Award, conferred on him by the Council on Social Work Education. Dr. Shulman has published numerous journal articles on the topic of direct practice and is the author of many books including the Enhanced Eighth Edition of the Empowerment Series: The Skills of Helping Individuals, Families, Groups, and Communities, the Dynamics and Skills of Group Counseling and the fourth edition of the seminal book Interactional Supervision.
    Parallel Process makes clear that the role of the supervisor and the purpose of supervision are quite different from counseling and therapy. However, there are striking parallels in the dynamics and skills. The core dynamics and skills of the supervisor-practitioner working relationship which include rapport, trust, and caring are similar to those skills used to develop a working alliance in psychotherapy.
    There are also four phases in the supervisory relationship which include the preliminary, beginning, middle and ending/transition phase, which shape the supervisory relationship over time. The use of certain communication, relationship and problem-solving skills by the supervisor can influence the development of a positive working relationship with the supervisee, and that this working relationship is the medium through which the supervisor influences the practitioner.
    Dr. Shulman puts emphasis on the word “influence” because a central assumption of this approach is that both supervision and direct practice are interactional in nature and that the supervisor and the supervisee each play a part in the process. The outcome of supervision is the result of how well each contributes to the process. Dr. Shulman’s suggests that “more is caught than taught” and that our supervisees watch their supervisors very closely. Whether we like it or not, whether we are aware of it or not, our supervisees learn more about practice from the way we work with them than from what we say about their actual practice. Supervision is not therapy, and, in fact, Dr. Shulman believes that supervisors who are seduced into a therapeutic relationship with their supervisees actually model poor practice, since they lose sight of the true purpose of clinical supervision and their role in the process.
    TherapyShow.com/Supervision-Best-Practices

    • 51 min
    #47 What is Dialectical Behavior Therapy? Dr. Vibh Forsythe Cox Interview

    #47 What is Dialectical Behavior Therapy? Dr. Vibh Forsythe Cox Interview

    Dr. Vibh Forsythe Cox is a consultant and trainer for Behavioral Tech, the training company founded by DBT treatment developer Dr. Marsha Linehan. Dr. Forsythe Cox is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist in Washington State, and a DBT-Linehan board of certification certified clinician.  She is the Training and Content Development Specialist at Behavioral Tech and was a primary content developer for Behavioral Tech’s Comprehensive Online Training which is an online training resource for therapists interested in being trained in Dialectical Behavioral Therapy.
    DBT aims to teach people how to live in the moment, cope healthily with stress, regulate emotions, and improve relationships with others. DBT provides individuals with new skills to process painful emotions and reduce conflict in their relationships. The term “dialectical” comes from the idea that bringing together two opposites in therapy—acceptance and change—can produce more positive results than either of these concepts alone. Clients can reach their goals when they work with a therapist to synthesize these two opposites.
    What is the “D” in DBT?
    The “D” means “dialectical.” A dialectic is a synthesis or integration of opposites. In DBT, dialectical strategies help both the therapist and the client get unstuck from extreme positions. In this video, learn how dialectical strategies keep the therapy in balance and help clients reach their ultimate goals as quickly as possible.
    What is the “B” in DBT?
    The “B” stands for “behavioral.” DBT requires a behavioral approach. This means that we assess the situations and target behaviors that are relevant to our clients’ goals in order to figure out how to solve the problems in their lives. Learn how DBT provides you a path to get the change that your clients so desperately need to see (BehavioralTech.org).
    therapyshow.com/Dialectical-Behavioral-Therapy
     

    • 47 min
    #46 Bipolar Disorder: A "Patient Centric" Approach to Treatment. Dr. Gary Sachs Interview

    #46 Bipolar Disorder: A "Patient Centric" Approach to Treatment. Dr. Gary Sachs Interview

    Dr. Gary Sachs is Clinical Vice President at Signant Health and the founder of Massachusetts General Hospital's Bipolar Clinic and Research Program. He is also an Associate Clinical Professor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and was the Principal Investigator of the National Institute of Mental Health’s Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar disorder. Dr. Sachs is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. He chairs the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA) also serves on DBSA board of directors. In March of 2020, he became president elect of the International Society for CNS Clinical Trial Methodology (ISCTM)  Dr. Sachs has authored over 200 peer reviewed articles and is a contributor to the seminal book Managing Bipolar Disorder: A Cognitive Behavior Treatment Program Therapist Guide (Treatments That Work) which addresses the management of bipolar disorder. In March of 2020, he became President Elect of the International Society for CNS Clinical Trial Methodology. Dr Sachs is an award-winning teacher and is recognized as a “Top Doctor” by US News and World Report, and by Reuters as among the world’s 100 most influential Psychiatrists, Neurologists and Neuroscientists.  
    Bipolar disorders are mood episodes that affect a person’s ability to function, and where a person experiences an intrusive mood episode such as mania, hypomania, or depression. These changes in mood can appear as intense highs and lows and can last for days at a time or longer. They are generally well demarcated changes in mood that interrupt previous functioning, which is to be distinguished from volatile behavior that is better explained by poor characterological temperament or the psychological effects of substance abuse.
    TherapyShow.com/bipolar-disorders

    • 42 min
    #45 Interpersonal Psychotherapy: Time Sensitive Evidence-Based Therapy. Dr. Myrna Weissman Interview

    #45 Interpersonal Psychotherapy: Time Sensitive Evidence-Based Therapy. Dr. Myrna Weissman Interview

    Interpersonal Psychotherapy focuses on social roles and relationships and is a time-limited course of treatment for depression and other mental disorders, which strengthens relationships and social supports in order to improve an individual’s mood and functioning. IPT generally lasts 12–16 weeks, with the timeframe agreed upon by therapist and client at the beginning of the treatment. IPT addresses swiftly the following problem areas in order to reduce symptoms: interpersonal disputes, role transitions, grief and loss, and interpersonal sensitivities (or deficits).
    Dr. Myrna Weissman is a Professor of Epidemiology and Psychiatry, Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University and Chief of the Division of Translational Epidemiology at New York State Psychiatric Institute. Dr. Weissman, along with her late husband Dr. Gerald Klerman, founded the therapeutic model of Interpersonal Psychotherapy. She is the author or a co-author of over 600 scientific articles and chapters and 12 books. Her most recent book is The Guide to Interpersonal Psychotherapy, which was published with her late husband Gerald Klerman, as well as John Markowitz.
    Interpersonal Psychotherapy on Twitter: @ipt_is

    • 19 min
    #44 A look into Mobile Crisis in New Jersey with Sean Cullen, LPC

    #44 A look into Mobile Crisis in New Jersey with Sean Cullen, LPC

    Sean Cullen is a Licensed Professional Counselor and was one of my first interviews last year before I graduated with my doctorate from Rutgers School of Social Work. So, if the sound is less than perfect, please forgive those imperfections. I wanted to release this podcast because Sean discusses how to effectively work with law enforcement in dealing with mobile psychiatric crisis situations in the community. This requires extensive training, but when done right, it can be an extremely beneficial and life-saving service.
    Sean is extensively trained and has over 19 years of experience working in emergency community settings as a Mobile Crisis Screener in Morris County, New Jersey. Sean is also a Medical and Psychiatric Clinician at one New Jersey’s best hospital systems, and actually took over for me when I left this hospital to pursue my doctoral work.
    Mobile Crisis is the provision of emergency mental health services in the home. If you are concerned about yourself, a family member, or a friend who is experiencing a psychiatric crisis, you can request a Mobile Crisis team to provide mental health intervention and support in the home to help overcome resistance to treatment (Goldman, 2015). Mobile crisis teams can provide mental health engagement, intervention and follow-up support to help overcome resistance to treatment.
    Depending on what a person is willing to accept, the teams may offer a range of services, including: Assessment, Crisis intervention, Supportive counseling, Information and referrals, including to community-based mental health services, and Transport to Psychiatric Emergency Room.
    If a mobile crisis team determines that a person in crisis needs further psychiatric or medical assessment, they can transport that person to a hospital psychiatric emergency room. Mobile crisis teams may direct police to take a person to an emergency room against their will only if they have a mental illness (or the appearance of mental illness) and are a danger to themselves or others.
    TherapyShow.com/MobileCrisis

    • 22 min
    #43 What is Internal Family Systems? Why Do We Have Parts? Dr. Richard Schwartz Interview

    #43 What is Internal Family Systems? Why Do We Have Parts? Dr. Richard Schwartz Interview

    Dr. Richard Schwartz earned his Ph.D. in Marriage and Family Therapy from Purdue University and is the founder of the therapeutic modality Internal Family Systems. Dr. Schwartz is also the founder of The Center for Self Leadership where professionals and the general public can attend workshops and trainings. Dr. Schwartz is the author of Family Therapy: Concepts and Methods, the most widely used family therapy text in the US. Dr. Schwartz is also the author of Introduction to the Internal Family Systems Model. Dr. Schwartz has also released a new audiobook, Greater Than the Sum of Our Parts: Discovering Your True Self Through Internal Family Systems Therapy. 
    IFS model of psychotherapy offers a clear, non-pathologizing, and empowering method of understanding human problems. IFS uses family systems theory—the idea that individuals cannot be fully understood in isolation from the family unit—to develop techniques and strategies to effectively address issues within a person’s internal family. This evidence-based approach assumes that each individual possesses a variety of sub-personalities or parts, with each part serving a particular role. Often, these internal parts are produced by the individual psyche in response to traumatic experience.
    These parts attempt to control and protect from the pain of the wounded parts and are often in conflict with each other and with one’s core Self. This undamaged core Self is the essence of the Self and represents the seat of consciousness with many positive qualities such as calmness, compassion, consecutiveness, confidence and leadership. For example, in alcoholic families, children often take on protective roles because of the dysfunction in the family. Some children may also take on maladaptive roles, such as the mascot, lost child, or scapegoat. In all of these cases, these roles are not the true nature of the children. These children are adapting to the chaos and upheaval that is common in the alcoholic family. A similar process occurs with internal families, where internal parts take on extreme roles caused by traumatic experiences. IFS can help transform these parts into positive internal family members.
    There are three distinct types of parts in the IFS model:
    Managers are responsible for warding off painful experiences and emotions in order to function in everyday life. 
    Exiles are often in a state of pain or trauma, which result from childhood experiences. Managers and firefighters exile these parts and prevent them from reaching the conscious level.
    Firefighters distract the mind when exiles can no longer be suppressed. In order to protect from feeling the pain of the exiles, firefighters make a person act impulsively and engage in behaviors such as addictive, abusive or self-harming such as alcohol, drugs, sex, or even work.
    Managers and Firefighters play the Protectors role, while Exiles are the parts needing protection.
    Re-released from 2019
    Dr. Richard Schwartz on Twitter: @DickSchwartzCSL

    • 31 min

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Dr. John Norcross show

Loved your questions you asked Dr. John Norcross along with asking about his successes. Very helpful. Thank you!

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