85 Folgen

In-depth conversations with some of the world's leading artists and creatives across theatre, visual arts, music, dance, film and more. Hosted by John Wilson.

This Cultural Life BBC Radio 4

    • Gesellschaft und Kultur
    • 4,0 • 1 Bewertung

In-depth conversations with some of the world's leading artists and creatives across theatre, visual arts, music, dance, film and more. Hosted by John Wilson.

    Antonio Pappano

    Antonio Pappano

    Sir Antonio Pappano is one of the world’s most acclaimed conductors. He started work at the age of ten as an accompanist for his father, who worked as a singing teacher. After leading orchestras in Brussels and Oslo, Pappano was appointed as musical director of the Royal Opera House in 2002. Stepping down after 22 years leading Covent Garden, he has joined the London Symphony Orchestra as chief conductor. Antonio Pappano was knighted in 2012 and conducted the orchestra at the coronation of King Charles III in 2023. An award winning recording artist, he has conducted on over 70 live and studio albums.
    Antonio Pappano tells John Wilson about his upbringing in a central London council flat, the son of Italian immigrants, and his love of music from an early age. He recalls the significance of receiving his grade 5 piano examination result by post, "a lightbulb moment” in which he realised what he wanted to do with his life. He also describes his parents' grief after the death of his baby sister, which led to the Pappano family moving to Connecticut, where Antonio continued his musical tuition under a local piano teacher called Norma Verrilli and composer Arnold Franchetti. His professional career was nurtured by conductor and pianist Daniel Barenboim who employed Pappano as his assistant for six years, a period in which he learned the art of conducting. He also looks back at his 22 years leading the Royal Opera at Covent Garden and talks candidly of his concerns about the funding and championing of opera in the UK.
    Producer: Edwina Pitman
    Music and archive:
    Puccini, Turandot, Act 1 Ah! per l’ultima volta!
    Liszt, Consolations S.172 for piano no.3 in D flat major; Lento placid
    Monteverdi, Dolci miei sospiri
    Gershwin, The Man I love
    Prokofiev, Symphony No.1 in D Major, Op.25 for two pianos
    Mozart, Piano Concerto No. 20 in D Minor, K. 466 I. Allegro
    Wagner, Das Rheingold, Act 1, Rheingold, Rheingold!
    Wagner, Tristan und Isolde, WWV 90, Act 3 Scene 2 O diese Sonne!
    Götterdämmerung, Act 3 Siegfrieds Trauermarsch
    Following Pappano, BBC Radio 4, September 2017
    Puccini, La_Boheme, Act 1, Che gelida manina
    Strauss, Ariadne auf Naxos, Opera
    Handel, Zadok the Priest, HWV 258
    Mozart, Le Nozze di Figaro, Act 3 Sull’aria che soave zeffiretto
    Vaughan Williams, Fantasia_on_a_Theme_by_Thomas_Tallis
    Ades, Three-piece Suite from Powder Her Face - Suite No.1

    • 43 Min.
    Michael Palin

    Michael Palin

    John Wilson talks to actor, comedian, broadcaster and writer Sir Michael Palin. A founding member of the hugely influential comedy troupe Monty Python’s Flying Circus, he wrote and performed in its five television series and three feature films including The Life Of Brian. Other big screen credits include A Fish Called Wanda, Brazil, The Missionary and The Death of Stalin. Michael is also a globetrotting documentary presenter and bestselling author.
    Michael recalls the early influence of listening to radio comedy as a child, especially the absurdist humour of The Goon Show devised by Spike Milligan. Meeting Terry Jones at Oxford University in 1962 proved to be a life-changing event as the two soon started working on sketches together and after graduating were hired for David Frost's satirical television show The Frost Report. It was on this programme that the duo first worked with future Python members John Cleese, Graham Chapman and Eric Idle.
    Starring in Alan Bleasdale's 1991 ground breaking television drama GBH allowed Michael a departure from comedy but also set the bar high for future acting roles which he increasingly forwent in favour of writing and presenting documentaries, including a particular favourite about the Danish Painter Vilhelm Hammershøi.
    Producer: Edwina Pitman
    Archive :
    A Fish Called Wanda, Charles Crichton, 1988
    Take It From Here, BBC Light Programme, 1954
    The Goon Show, The Man Who Never Was, BBC Light Programme, 1958
    Comic Roots, BBC1, 1983
    That Was The Week That Was, BBC, 1963
    The Frost Report, BBC1, 1966
    Do Not Adjust Your Set, ITV, 1967
    Monty Python’s Flying Circus, BBC1, 1969-1970
    The Meaning of Life, Terry Jones, 1983
    Friday Night, Saturday Morning, BBC2, 1979
    The Life of Brian, Terry Jones, 1979
    GBH, Alan Bleasdale, Channel 4, 1991
    The Death of Stalin, Armando Iannucci, 2017
    Michael Palin and the Mystery of Hammershøi, BBC4, 2008

    • 44 Min.
    Yorgos Lanthimos

    Yorgos Lanthimos

    Filmmaker Yorgos Lanthimos first emerged as part the so-called ‘weird wave’ of Greek cinema, and is known for unsettling themes and absurdist humour of his films. He made his mark internationally in 2009 with Dogtooth, which won a Cannes film festival prize and was nominated for an Oscar. Shifting into English language cinema with The Lobster, starring Colin Farrell and Olivia Colman, he continued to win awards and acclaim with The Killing Of A Sacred Deer and his historical comedy drama The Favourite. His most recent film Poor Things, starring Emma Stone, has been nominated for eleven Academy awards, including best film and best director.
    Yorgos Lanthimos tells John Wilson about his upbringing in Athens, the son of a professional basketball player who was part of the Greek national team, and how, after graduating from film school, he began making commercials and pop videos. He reveals why the work of the American photographer Diane Arbus, renowned for the underlying psychological tension of her portraits, was a major inspiration on the mood of his films. He also cites the influences of the German choreographer Pina Bausch on visual elements in his films, including dance routines seen in The Favourite and Poor Things. The plays of the British writer Sarah Kane, including Blasted and Crave, were also influential on the tone of his darkly humorous films.
    Producer: Edwina Pitman
    Diane Arbus' quote is from the documentary film Going Where I've Never Been: The Photography of Diane Arbus (1972), voiced by Mariclare Costello.

    • 44 Min.
    Juliette Binoche

    Juliette Binoche

    French actor Juliette Binoche is known for her portrayal of emotionally complex characters. Over a forty year career, her films have included Three Colours Blue, Les Amants de Pont Neuf, Chocolat, and The English Patient, for which she won her Academy Award. Her most recent film is The Taste of Things, a French drama about a cook and the gourmet she works for, in which she stars opposite Benoît Magimel.
    Juliette Binoche talks to John Wilson about an early moment of revelation, watching Peter Brookes' production of Alfred Jarry's play Ubu Roi at in Paris in 1977, which first made her realise she wanted to act. She explains the influence of her acting coach Véra Gregh, who helped her to understand the difference between "acting" and "being". She also recalls her experiences working with some of the most acclaimed film directors; Jean-Luc Godard on Hail Mary; Leos Carax on Les Amants du Pont-Neuf; Krzysztof Kieślowski on Three Colours: Blue; and Anthony Minghella on The English Patient.
    Producer: Edwina Pitman

    • 44 Min.
    Frank Auerbach

    Frank Auerbach

    A rare interview with Frank Auerbach, one of the world’s greatest living painters. At 92 years old, he has been painting for over 70 years and still works every day. A child refugee from Nazi Germany whose parents were killed in Auschwitz, he made his name alongside his friends and fellow painters Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud and Leon Kossoff in the 1950s. He’s well known for the thick layers of the paint used to create his portraits and images of the streets around the studio in Camden Town where he has worked since 1954.
    Frank Auerbach talks to John Wilson about his fragmentary memories of his early childhood in pre-war Berlin and his education at the boarding school Bunce Court in Kent, where he arrived aged 7. He recalls the huge impression that a black and white reproduction in a children's encyclopaedia of Turner's The Fighting Temeraire made on him as a boy, making him want to "do better and be less superficial". Auerbach also discusses the influence on him of the artist David Bomberg who taught him at London's Borough Polytechnic, and his friend and fellow student Leon Kossoff. He also talks about his friendships with Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud and why he still paints and draws in his studio seven days a week.
    Producer: Edwina Pitman

    • 44 Min.
    Boy George

    Boy George

    Born George O'Dowd, Boy George shot to pop stardom in 1982 as frontman with the band Culture Club and later as a solo artist. With his soulful vocals and flamboyant, androgynous looks, he became a massive star around the world with hits such as Do You Really Want to Hurt Me? and Karma Chameleon. His personal struggles with drug addiction and a prison sentence in 2009 meant he was rarely far from tabloid headlines. In recent years he’s been a judge on The Voice, survived the jungle in I’m A Celebrity Get Me Out Of Here, and has just published a new memoir called Karma. He continues to record and perform as a prolific solo singer songwriter.
    George discusses the impact that David Bowie had on him as a teenager and recalls seeing him at the Lewisham Odeon during the Ziggy Stardust tour of 1973. He also talks about the important influence of club promoter Philip Sallon who introduced him to London's gay scene in the late 1970s. Meeting Quentin Crisp in New York with Andy Warhol was also a formative cultural moment. George talks to John Wilson candidly about coping with fame and rebuilding his life after addiction and prison.
    Producer: Edwina Pitman

    • 44 Min.

Kundenrezensionen

4,0 von 5
1 Bewertung

1 Bewertung

Top‑Podcasts in Gesellschaft und Kultur

Hotel Matze
Matze Hielscher & Mit Vergnügen
Paarspektiven
Ischtar und Tommy
Hoss & Hopf
Kiarash Hossainpour & Philip Hopf
Alles gesagt?
ZEIT ONLINE
Betreutes Fühlen
Atze Schröder & Leon Windscheid
Die Paartherapie
NDR

Das gefällt dir vielleicht auch

Front Row
BBC Radio 4
Private Passions
BBC Radio 3
Desert Island Discs
BBC Radio 4
Great Lives
BBC Radio 4
Books and Authors
BBC Radio 4
Young Again
BBC Radio 4