189 episodes

Host Mamie Kanfer Stewart shares practical approaches to help you be a great manager. Solo episodes are like mini-courses, providing actionable tips based on experience and research. Guest episodes are engaging conversations that elicit insights and suggestions for how to apply the ideas.

Episodes features topics like: effective meeting practices, communication skills, managing conflict, team building, time management, group dynamics, goal setting and accountability, team competencies, productivity and collaboration technologies, organizational culture, and more.

The Modern Manager Mamie Kanfer Stewart

    • Business

Host Mamie Kanfer Stewart shares practical approaches to help you be a great manager. Solo episodes are like mini-courses, providing actionable tips based on experience and research. Guest episodes are engaging conversations that elicit insights and suggestions for how to apply the ideas.

Episodes features topics like: effective meeting practices, communication skills, managing conflict, team building, time management, group dynamics, goal setting and accountability, team competencies, productivity and collaboration technologies, organizational culture, and more.

    182: Improve Your Executive Functioning Skills

    182: Improve Your Executive Functioning Skills

    Executive functioning is a set of cognitive skills that help us manage time, plan, prioritize, initiate and complete tasks, regulate emotions, and resist distractions. These skills impact how we perform at work and in life – it’s the foundation of self-management. 
     
    This is the second of two episodes on executive functioning skills. This episode reviews strategies to improve  executive functioning skills so you can help yourself or support that colleague. The first episode (#178) explains what executive functioning skills are and how they show up in the workplace, as well as how you can assess yourself and your colleagues in each area. 
     
    The full episode guide includes an overview of the process and tips from today as well as specific suggested approaches for some of the most common executive functioning challenges people struggle with at work. Get it when you join the Modern Manager community or purchase the full guide at www.themodernmanager.com/shop.  
     
    Get the free mini-guide at themodernnmanager.com/miniguides.
     
    Subscribe to my newsletter to get episodes, articles and free mini-guides delivered to your inbox. 
     
    Read the related blog article: Improve Performance by Improving Executive Functioning Skills
      
    Key Takeaways:

    There are eleven executive functioning skills our brains use to process and decide on an action. 
    Notice when the struggle is a combination of executive functioning skills that work together to compound a weakness.
    Changing behavior is hard. Before trying to develop a skill, look for ways to reduce your reliance on that skill.
    Try altering the environment in ways that minimize usage of a weaker skill.
    Try adding motivation, both incentives or penalties, that could give you the extra push.
    If neither of those are enough, look for ways to improve the weaker skill like finding a coach or practicing the skill.
    Create a development plan to help you or a team member work more effectively.
    Clarify the real problem, envision what success looks like, brainstorm solutions, decide on a plan, and track progress. 

    Additional Resources:

    • 14 min
    181: How to Foster Self-Directed Learning with Tom Tonkin

    181: How to Foster Self-Directed Learning with Tom Tonkin

    From a young age, much of our lives have been directed by others. Our parents, teachers, and other adults tell us what to do and how to do it. In many cultures, it’s not until adulthood that we are truly able to be self-directed, and by that point, it can be difficult for some of us to know how to show up most effectively without the constant direction from others. Yet self-direction is an important, and often underutilized, skill in today’s workplace.  
     
    Today’s guest is Dr. Tom Tonkin. Tom is an award-winning researcher, author, and CEO and Founder of The Conservatory Group with 25 years of experience in corporate America under his belt. Tom’s organization provides high-touch services to business executives that want to improve themselves, their team, and their environment. Tom is also involved at an executive level in two organizations with DE&I at the forefront, SAMI and Diversity Equity Inclusion.
     
    Tom and I talk about variations in how our brains work and different styles, how that impacts how we collaborate with our team members, how our brains like to learn, and a lot more.
     
    Members of the Modern Manager community get the Self-Directed Learner Assessment. Updated with the latest research, this resource will help you improve your self-direction. Get it when you join the Modern Manager community.
     
    Subscribe to my newsletter to get episodes, articles and free mini-guides delivered to your inbox. 
     
    Read the related blog article: How Managers Can Support More Effective Learning
     
    KEEP UP WITH TOM:
     

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drtomtonkin/


    Twitter: @DrTomTonkin


    The Conservatory Group: https://www.theconservatory.group

     
     
    Key Takeaways:

    There is a spectrum of preference from completely self-directed (independent) to completely directed (dependent) when it comes to learning and managing ourselves.
    Managers who like to command, tend to work well with people who prefer to be directed. Managers who like to be hands-off, tend to work well with people who are highly independent. 
    Managers need to learn to work with all types of people regardless of style or preference.
    We learn soft skills and hard skills differently because they live in different parts of the brain. 

    • 24 min
    180: Improving the Foundations of Management with Rachel Pacheco

    180: Improving the Foundations of Management with Rachel Pacheco

    For a first time manager, it can feel like a bait-and-switch: You were told you’re now a manager but what they should have said is you now have to lead meetings, give feedback, make hard decisions, manage conflict, set deadlines and hold people accountable, and about a million other things. Even for experienced managers, it can feel like we’ve never really developed all the skills needed to succeed at this part of our job. 
    Today’s guest is Rachel Pacheco. Rahel is the author of Bringing Up the Boss, a faculty member at the Wharton School in the Management Department and a Start-up advisor.
    Rachel and I talk about what management actually is and then we get into some of the most common areas that managers - both new and seasoned - struggle with like setting clear expectations, giving constructive feedback, and motivating team members, and what you can do to develop these skills.
    Members of the Modern Manager community get 35% off Rachel’s book Bringing Up The Boss. Get the discount code when you join the Modern Manager community.
     
    Subscribe to my newsletter to get episodes, articles and free mini-guides delivered to your inbox. 
     
    Read the related blog article: Management Fundamentals Every Manager Should Excel In
     
    KEEP UP WITH RACHEL:

    Website: www.rachelpacheco.com
    Book: https://www.amazon.com/Bringing-Up-Boss-Practical-Managers/dp/1953295010

     
    Key Takeaways:

    Management is the broad term for dozens of activities managers are responsible for. These activities can be categorized as (1) managing individuals, (2) managing a team collectively, and (3) managing yourself.
    Managers who fear micromanaging end up not giving their team enough structure. 
    Keep goals simple and few so your team can prioritize. Don’t be too goal-focused that your team forgets other important tasks. 
    Give clear expectations for what “good” looks like. 
    Explain the impact of what you’re doing to increase motivation and big picture thinking. 
    Frequent feedback is one of a manager's most important jobs but we avoid it because it doesn't feel “nice”. Yet, withholding feedback harms our employees’ ability to get better, hurting their future success. 

    • 29 min
    179: Free Your Time For What Matters Most with Dorie Clark

    179: Free Your Time For What Matters Most with Dorie Clark

    It's easy to get caught up in the game of doing. There are so many opportunities in life. Saying no can be one of the most difficult things managers need to do to protect their time. We want to do it all, but at the end of the day, being so busy doesn’t make us happy or help us achieve our goals. Saying no forces you to figure out what's important, gives you more time to focus on the long term, makes you more deliberate with your decisions, and reminds you of what life is all about.
     
    Today’s guest is Dorie Clark. Dorie has been named one of the Top 50 business thinkers in the world by Thinkers50. She is a keynote speaker and teaches for Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business. She is also the author of Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand Out, which was named the #1 Leadership Book of the year by Inc. magazine. A former presidential campaign spokeswoman, she writes frequently for the Harvard Business Review.
     
    Dorie and I talk about lessons from her new book, The Long Game, about how to become a long-term thinker in a short-term world! Which, hint, is all about how we prioritize and spend our precious time
     
    Members of the Modern Manager community get my Saying No cheat sheet to help you remember when to say no and how to say no in ways that still feel good. Get it when you join the Modern Manager community.
     
    Subscribe to my newsletter to get episodes, articles and free mini-guides delivered to your inbox. 
     
    Read the related blog article: How To Stop Being So Busy
     
    KEEP UP WITH DORIE
    Twitter: https://twitter.com/dorieclarkLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/doriec/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dorieclarkauthor/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dorieclark/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/DorieClarkThe Long Game Free Self-Assessment: https://dorieclark.com/longgame/
     
    Key Takeaways:

    There are many reasons we continue to be “too busy” even when we say we don’t like it, including that we feel important when we’re

    • 31 min
    178: What Are Executive Functioning Skills?

    178: What Are Executive Functioning Skills?

    Executive functioning is a common topic amongst parents and educators of teens, but rarely discussed in the workplace. Yet, it’s the set of capabilities that we use daily to regulate our emotions, thinking, and behavior which collectively allow us to deliver results. This skill set, like any other, needs to be understood by managers so that we can improve ourselves and support our colleagues.
     
    This is the first of two episodes on executive functioning skills. This episode is focused on what executive functioning skills are and how they show up in the workplace, as well as how you can assess yourself and your colleagues in each area. The second episode (#182) will be strategies to improve each area, so if you discover your own weakness or that a colleague struggles with a particular skill, you’ll have some ideas for how to help yourself or support that colleague.
     
    The full episode guide includes an overview of the eleven executive functioning skills, how they interact and natural groupings that compound, and questions for reflection to help you assess yourself and your colleagues. Get it when you join the Modern Manager community or purchase the full guide at www.themodernmanager.com/shop.  
     
    Get the free mini-guide at themodernnmanager.com/miniguides.
     
    Subscribe to my newsletter to get episodes, articles and free mini-guides delivered to your inbox. 
     
    Read the related blog article: 11 Executive Functioning Skills Needed In The Workplace
     
    Key Takeaways:

    There are eleven executive functioning skills our brains use to process and decide on an action. 
    Motivation and context matter to our ability to perform these skills. We may have strengths or struggle under different conditions.
    Response inhibition is being able to thoughtfully control our response rather than reacting to stimuli. 
    Working memory holds onto relevant information for a short period of time.
    Emotional control navigates feelings in a healthy way. 
    Sustained attention is the capability of sticking to a task, especially when tiring, challenging or boring.
    Task initiation is the ability to jump in on a project without procrastinating. 
    Planning and prioritizing means creating

    • 16 min
    177: Measuring Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Your Team with Erica Lee

    177: Measuring Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Your Team with Erica Lee

    Organizations are prioritizing DEI, but what is guiding their decisions? It’s important to gather data that can inform strategies, programmatic investments, and help track progress. But what data is captured, as well as how that data is gathered, is critical.
    Today’s guest is Erica Lee. Erica is the co-founder and COO of Pluto, a startup advancing DEI through analytics and communication tools. Her background is in law, international development and policy.
    Erica and I talk about how to measure diversity, equity, and inclusion within your team or organization. We talk about the process of gathering data, protecting privacy, turning responses into insight and more. 
     
    Members of the Modern Manager community get a complimentary 30-minute consult with me to help you strategize rolling out a DEI survey. Get it when you join the Modern Manager community.
     
    Subscribe to my newsletter to get episodes, articles and free mini-guides delivered to your inbox. 
     
    Read the related blog article: What Most DEI Surveys Get Wrong—And How to do it Right
     
    KEEP UP WITH ERICA
    Website: https://pluto.life/Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/erica-lee-2013/
     
    Key Takeaways:

    We can approach DEI just like any other business goals: using data driven strategy and tracking progress.
    DEI surveys need to go deeper than HR data to help us understand diversity.. They should provide an opportunity for people to see themselves in the responses. 
    DEI surveys should address equity and inclusion such as a person’s sense of belonging, if they are getting the promotions and pay they desire, and more. 
    Pluto creates an evolving story from the survey responses rather than just a checklist. “Other” is never an option.
    The best surveys are ones where people can reflect and learn about themselves.
    When people don’t trust surveys, they disengage. They need to feel their information and privacy are protected. 
    Managers were surprised to learn from Pluto about their team’s mental health issues.
    If Pluto isn’t the right tool for your team, find pre-built DEI surveys that ensure privacy. Don’t use an excel spreadsheet where you

    • 32 min

Top Podcasts In Business

You Might Also Like