79 episodes

EcoJustice Radio is a weekly broadcast produced by SoCal350.org from the studios of KPFK in Los Angeles. We cover environmental and climate stories from a social justice frame, featuring voices not necessarily heard on traditional, mainstream, or even public media outlets. SoCal 350 Climate Action Media works to educate our communities and decision makers on movements for solutions to environmental, climate, social and environmental justice issues challenging our cities and wild landscapes across the US, and around the world. We envision sustainable, equitable communities, regenerated landscapes, and a 100% clean energy future with full employment.

EcoJustice Radio SoCal 350 Climate Action Media

    • Society & Culture

EcoJustice Radio is a weekly broadcast produced by SoCal350.org from the studios of KPFK in Los Angeles. We cover environmental and climate stories from a social justice frame, featuring voices not necessarily heard on traditional, mainstream, or even public media outlets. SoCal 350 Climate Action Media works to educate our communities and decision makers on movements for solutions to environmental, climate, social and environmental justice issues challenging our cities and wild landscapes across the US, and around the world. We envision sustainable, equitable communities, regenerated landscapes, and a 100% clean energy future with full employment.

    Permaculture Lessons From Fire: Restoring Paradise - Ep. 77

    Permaculture Lessons From Fire: Restoring Paradise - Ep. 77

    Hear Permaculture Designer/Educator & consultant Matthew Trumm of Treetop Permaculture [http://www.facebook.com/ttpermaculture] discuss lessons learned during the Camp Fire which burned through the town of Paradise, California, in November 2018. At the time, it was the most devastating wildfire in California history, burning 240 square miles in its wake.

    Given current wildfires burning now in Washington, Oregon and throughout California, particularly in the north, and the accelerating impacts of climate change, it is critically important to reestablish our connection to the forest as an essential ecosystem, and to restore its ecological function using regenerative principles.

    Matthew discusses permaculture-based restoration efforts he and the local community engaged in Paradise, indigenous perspectives on the effectiveness of cool burns, remediating toxicity post-fires, and establishing the Camp Fire Restoration Project [http://www.campfirerestorationproject.org] as the premier "mobile" ecosystem restoration camp in the world modeled upon disaster recovery. Inspired by ecologist & filmmaker John Liu who we interviewed earlier this year on EcoJustice Radio, Matthew shows us how they overcame the massive wildfire disaster and are working to restore ‘Paradise’.

    Matthew Trumm Owner and Founder of Treetop Industries is a Permaculture educator, designer, and consultant from Oroville, California, in Butte County. Since Matthew commenced his land-based studies in 2011, he has pioneered countless Permaculture projects including the nonprofit Camp Fire Restoration Project and nurturing a local food movement, all under the umbrella, Treetop Permaculture.

    Related websites
    https://www.coopabox.com/
    http://www.hearthstoneschool.net/

    Interview by Carry Kim
    Hosted by Jessica Aldridge
    Engineer: Blake Lampkin
    Executive Producer: Jack Eidt
    Show Created by Mark and JP Morris
    Music: Javier Kadry
    Episode 77

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Candidate Forum for Environmental Justice in South LA with Fatima Iqbal-Zubair - Ep. 76

    Candidate Forum for Environmental Justice in South LA with Fatima Iqbal-Zubair - Ep. 76

    The events of 2020, from the pandemic to the uprising, have made the upcoming election a pivotal moment in time. In particular, the Black and Brown communities of South Los Angeles, facing generations of systemic racism and growing inequality, demand a new way forward with political leaders having the opportunity to bring forward solutions to police violence, environmental injustice, and social and economic mismanagement and exploitation. But can political leaders overcome the corporate money that prioritizes industry over people, profits over community?

    In this episode we get to know one of the candidates running for California Assembly for South Los Angeles, Fatima Iqbal-Zubair. The incumbent Assemblymember Mike Gipson was asked to be on the show but did return our requests.

    Fatima’s campaign platform is founded on ending systemic racism by prioritizing clean air, water, and food; supporting affordable housing and ending homelessness; pushing for health care for all; and reforming our education system, criminal justice, and immigration. She says she is running to uplift the voices in her community, not the special interests that run the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, and the multiple oil refineries and drilling sites in the area, that have dominated business as usual in the district. Her goal is economic justice and a just transition to a green economy with full employment.

    Fatima Iqbal-Zubair, candidate for California Assembly District 64 [https://fatimaforassembly.com/], is a public school teacher in Watts, an immigrant, and a community advocate.

    Essay by Fatima: https://knock-la.com/we-are-at-a-tipping-point-liberation-and-nothing-less-f7f4e4de30de

    Hosted by Jessica Aldridge from Adventures in Waste [http://adventuresinwaste.com/]
    Engineer: Blake Lampkin
    Executive Producer: Jack Eidt
    Show Created by Mark and JP Morris
    Music: Javier Kadry
    Episode 76

    • 1 hr
    Flood Control to Free Rivers: The Tale of Water on Tongvalands - Ep 75

    Flood Control to Free Rivers: The Tale of Water on Tongvalands - Ep 75

    Our guests discuss the history of water upon Tongvalands aka Los Angeles: from free-flowing rivers to concrete-engineered flood control and back again.

    Hear about the historical impacts of channelization, the formation of dams and the current movement toward dam removal across Turtle Island (aka. the Americas). Once an unbridled, seasonal river wending from the mountains to the ocean, by the 1960s, the entire length of the 51-mile long Paayme Paheight (aka. Los Angeles River) was concretized, destined to become infrastructure and a functional sewer. However, this is no longer the river's destiny as advocacy for freeing the river and its tributaries, restoring native habitat and wildlife grows.

    Hahamongna is the rare spot in the Arroyo Seco at the foot of the San Gabriel Mountains of Southern California where the mountainous watershed meets the urban plain. Periodically floods roar into this basin. Hahamongna contains five unique habitat zones that only exist in alluvial canyons near the mountains. Most sites like this in Southern California have been destroyed. The word means "Flowing Waters, Fruitful Valley" in the native Tongva language. The Hahamongna Native Plant Nursery in Pasadena was so named by revered Chief Yanna (also known as Vera Rocha), a Gabrieliño Shoshone who taught the nursery's community indigenous life ways and how to "see" and care for Hahamongna.

    More info on Saving Hahamongna: http://www.savehahamongna.org

    Tim Brick is Managing Director of the Arroyo Seco Foundation [http://www.arroyoseco.org], and has been involved in promoting environmental awareness and sustainability for many years. He served on the Board of Directors of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California for 28 years including two terms as chair.

    Parker Davis is Director of Marketing and Communications at the Hahamongna Native Plant Nursery [http://www.hahamongna.org]. A Pasadena native with a background in fine arts, he has an aesthetic obsession with California native plants. He works with volunteers, propagating plants for restoring natural areas & beautifying the local community’s neighborhoods and public spaces.

    Interview by Carry Kim
    Hosted by Jessica Aldridge
    Engineer: Blake Lampkin
    Executive Producer: Jack Eidt
    Show Created by Mark and JP Morris
    Music: Javier Kadry
    Episode 75
    Photo by One Arroyo Foundation

    • 51 min
    Ocean Desalination vs Conservation and Human Rights - Ep 74

    Ocean Desalination vs Conservation and Human Rights - Ep 74

    TUNE IN! Guests Andrea Leon Grossman from AZUL [http://azul.org/en/] and Conner Everts from Southern California Watershed Alliance discuss the proposal by Poseidon Water Company to build a $1 billion desalination plant in Huntington Beach, California. When the price tag is more than 2x the cost of our current water system, is desal necessary? Can existing and future conservation opportunities provide the solutions necessary to ensure local water resilience in California and elsewhere?

    Paid for by taxpayers and ratepayers to privatize water, this industrial project would erode the #HumanRightToWater, kill marine life and it will run on dirty energy for decades to come. They already received $585 million from Trump's EPA and applied for $1.1 billion in CDLAC funds from California that usually go to build affordable housing.

    More Info: https://www.smarterwaterla.org/

    Andrea Leon-Grossman, Director of Climate Action at AZUL, is a Mexican-born immigrant who works with the Latinx community to protect and conserve our coasts and oceans. She has always been passionate about fighting for environmental and social justice, and has been involved with immigrant rights, juvenile justice, animal rights, and of course, environmental groups, for nearly two decades.

    Conner Everts, Executive Director of the Southern California Watershed Alliance [http://ewccalifornia.org/staff/] and Co-Chair of the Desal Response Group [https://www.facebook.com/pages/Desal-Response-Group/514608058614252], has spent a lifetime in pursuit of clean water, first as a Southern California steelhead fisherman and then in the quest of the Human Right to Water. He is currently co-chair of the Southern California Water Dialogue, the Green LA Water Committee and as an elder advisor to the Environmental Justice Coalition for Water and Amigos de los Rios.

    Hosted by Jessica Aldridge from Adventures in Waste [http://adventuresinwaste.com/]
    Engineer: Blake Lampkin
    Executive Producer: Jack Eidt
    Show Created by Mark and JP Morris
    Music: Javier Kadry
    Episode 74

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Missions of Culture: Reclaiming Indigenous Wisdom with Caroline Ward Holland - Ep. 73

    Missions of Culture: Reclaiming Indigenous Wisdom with Caroline Ward Holland - Ep. 73

    Tune in as we welcome Caroline Ward Holland, a Tribal citizen of the Fernandeño Band of Mission Indians or Tataviam Nation, as she speaks on the ongoing movement to topple controversial Mission monuments and mythologies. She recounts with host Carry Kim her Walk for the Ancestors [http://walkfortheancestors.org/] in 2015, a pilgrimage she embarked upon with her son, Kagen Holland, to honor the Ancestors at all 21 missions in California.

    In 2015. When Pope Francis announced he would move forward with the canonization of Junipero Serra, Caroline set out on a 780 mile journey to honor the Indigenous Ancestors who suffered and perished throughout the Mission System. Walking from the last mission built in Sonoma CA to the first mission built in San Diego. This experience put her in a completely forward direction advocating for historical truth and promoting healing in truth. Caroline sits on the University of California's Critical Mission Studies advisory board, comprised of numerous Mission Indian Scholars as well as Tribal Leaders.
    Fernandeño Tataviam Band of Mission Indians: https://www.tataviam-nsn.us/
    Unmonumenting the Architects of Genocide, Enslavement and Mass Incarceration: https://bit.ly/unmonumenting

    Interview by Carry Kim
    Hosted by Jessica Aldridge
    Engineer: Blake Lampkin
    Executive Producer: Jack Eidt
    Show Created by Mark and JP Morris
    Music: Javier Kadry
    Episode 73
    Photo by Erick Iñiguez / https://www.instagram.com/erickphotolenz/

    • 58 min
    Building Unity for Social Change with Kwazi Nkrumah - Ep 72

    Building Unity for Social Change with Kwazi Nkrumah - Ep 72

    Guest Kwazi Nkrumah from the MLK Coalition for Greater Los Angeles [http://mlkcoalitionforjobsjusticeandpeace.org/] discusses with host Jessica Aldridge how unity and mass mobilization across all movements is necessary for social change and an equitable future. He speaks to how we effectively do this in an inclusive manner across interests and issues that considers priorities, roadblocks, and better relationship building. We address concerns of derailment and demobilization, and look to how we can shield and grow from those movements.

    ~ Kwazi Nkrumah is the Co-Chair of MLK Coalition of Greater Los Angeles for Jobs, Justice, and Peace. Kwazi is a nationally respected community and labor organizer, and a human and environmental rights activist and advocate. Over the years he has been a successful leader for economic justice efforts on behalf of tenants, homeowners, and working people.

    Further reading on anti-racist organizing:
    Robert L. Allen: "Reluctant Reformers: Racism and Social Reform Movements in the United States" - https://www.amazon.com/Reluctant-Reformers-Racism-Social-Movements/dp/0882580264

    Hosted by Jessica Aldridge from Adventures in Waste [http://adventuresinwaste.com/]
    Engineer: Blake Lampkin
    Executive Producer: Jack Eidt
    Show Created by Mark and JP Morris
    Music: Javier Kadry
    Episode 72

    • 58 min

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