100 episodes

Wendy Shinyo Haylett, an author, Buddhist teacher, lay minister, behavioral and spiritual coach shares the "tips and tricks" found in Buddhist teachings to make your professional and personal life better ... everyday!

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better Wendy Shinyo Haylett

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 4.5 • 29 Ratings

Wendy Shinyo Haylett, an author, Buddhist teacher, lay minister, behavioral and spiritual coach shares the "tips and tricks" found in Buddhist teachings to make your professional and personal life better ... everyday!

    Your Heart Was Made for This with Oren Jay Soffer

    Your Heart Was Made for This with Oren Jay Soffer

    In this episode I talk with Oren Jay Soffer about his new book, Your Heart Was Made for This: Contemplative Practices for Meeting a World in Crisis with Courage, Integrity & Love.
    Oren teaches meditation and communication internationally. He holds a degree in comparative religion from Columbia University and is a Certified Trainer of Nonviolent Communication and a Somatic Experiencing Practitioner for the healing of trauma.
    Oren has practiced meditation in the early Buddhist tradition since 1997, beginning his studies in Bodh Gaya, India, and later spending 2-1/2 years living as an renunciate at branch monasteries in the Ajahn Chah Thai Forest lineage. He is a long-time student of Joseph Goldstein, Michele McDonald, and Ajahn Sucitto, and is a member of the Spirit Rock Teacher’s Council.
    Oren is also the author of the best-seller Say What You Mean: A Mindful Approach to Nonviolent Communication and two books on teaching mindfulness to adolescents: The Mindful Schools Curriculum for Adolescents and Teaching Mindfulness to Empower Teens.
    His teaching has reached people around the world through online communication courses and guided meditations, combining classical Buddhist training with the accessible language of secular mindfulness
    In our conversation we talked about, among other things:
    How our hearts REALLY are made for these times … Our hearts were made to awaken and if we can practice—in small steps—turning toward suffering, we enter a portal to transformation. How the world shapes our hearts in ways not best for us and how we can practice shaping our own hearts. How getting in touch with our true values will guide us through these challenging times. How we need to consciously "change the channel" of our thoughts to be more aligned with our true values.  
    Buy the book (Amazon affiliate link):
    Your Heart Was Made for This
     
    Learn more about Oren Jay Soffer, his teaching, courses, and special events:
    https://www.orenjaysofer.com/
     
    YouTube:
    https://www.youtube.com/c/orenjaysofervideo
     
    Instagram:
    https://www.instagram.com/orenjaysofer
     
    Facebook:
    https://www.facebook.com/OrenJaySofer/
     
    X/Twitter:
    https://www.facebook.com/OrenJaySofer/
     
    LinkedIn:
    https://www.linkedin.com/in/orenjaysofer/
     

     
    Become a patron to support this podcast and get special member benefits, including a membership community and virtual sangha:
    https://www.patreon.com/EverydayBuddhism
     
    Join the Everyday Sangha:
    Join the Everyday Sangha
     
    Join the Membership Community:
    https://donorbox.org/membershipcommunity
     
    If this podcast has helped you understand Buddhism or help in your everyday life, consider making a one-time donation here:
    https://donorbox.org/podcast-donations

     

    Support the podcast through the affiliate link to buy the book, Everyday Buddhism: Real-Life Buddhist Teachings & Practices for Real Change: Buy the book, Everyday Buddhism

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Appalachian Zen with Steve Kanji Ruhl: A Journey in Search of True Home

    Appalachian Zen with Steve Kanji Ruhl: A Journey in Search of True Home

    Join me for a delightful conversation with Steve Kanji Ruhl about his book, Appalachian Zen: Journeys in Search of True Home, from the American Heartland to the Buddha Dharma, the 2023 Gold Prize winner for Memoir in the Nautilus Book Awards.
    Steve Kanji is a Zen Buddhist minister ordained in the Zen Peacemaker Order, now teaching independently and instructing Zen students through his Touch the Earth cyber-sangha. Reverend Kanji received his Master of Divinity degree from Harvard University and is a Buddhist chaplain at Deerfield Academy, a Buddhist Adviser at Yale University, and faculty member of the Shogaku Zen Institute.
    Kanji has been a guest speaker or workshop facilitator at Harvard’s Center for World Religions, Yale Divinity School, the International Conference on Socially Engaged Buddhism, the Omega Institute, and elsewhere.
    In addition to Appalachian Zen, he is the author of Enlightened Contemporaries: Francis, Dogen & Rumi—Three Great Mystics of the Thirteenth Century and Why They Matter Today and has recently finished writing a new book about his personal experience of spirituality and wellness called The Whole Earth is Medicine: Science, Zen, and Healing Body and Mind in a Journey through Cancer. He has also published two volumes of poems, The Constant Yes of Things and Paintings of Rice Cakes Satisfy Hunger.
    In his book, Appalachian Zen, Kanji takes us on a 30-year journey through his search to find his "true home" in lilting and lyrical prose and poems that move the story from Appalachia through academia—constantly asking: What is home? What is this? What is life? Death? What is real? … The questions Buddhism never answer but continue to ask.
    In our conversation we talked about, among other things:
    -Childhood memories
    -The search for self and the search for losing the self
    -Being a foolish being and Shin Buddhism
    -The contrast between Western and Eastern philosophical and spiritual worldviews
    -Mystical Christianity and the similarity to the direct experience of the sacred in Buddhism
    -Buddhist lay ministers as compared to Buddhist monastics, priest, and the "guru model"
    -Kanji's teaching of "Be Clear, Be Kind, Be Present"
     
    Buy the book (Amazon affiliate link):
    Appalachian Zen
     
    Buy the book from the publisher:
    Appalachian Zen
     
    Learn more about Steve Kanji Ruhl, his teaching, spiritual guidance, and special events:
    http://www.stevekanjiruhl.com
     

     

     
    *Special Everyday Buddhism Substack / Words From My Teachers podcast subscription promo code:
    Redeem by 3/31/2024 for 20% subscription for 1 year!
     
    Become a patron to support this podcast and get special member benefits, including a membership community and virtual sangha:
    https://www.patreon.com/EverydayBuddhism
     
    Join the Everyday Sangha:
    Join the Everyday Sangha
     
    Join the Membership Community:
    https://donorbox.org/membershipcommunity
     
    If this podcast has helped you understand Buddhism or help in your everyday life, consider making a one-time donation here:
    https://donorbox.org/podcast-donations

     

    Support the podcast through the affiliate link to buy the book, Everyday Buddhism: Real-Life Buddhist Teachings & Practices for Real Change: Buy the book, Everyday Buddhism

    • 1 hr 18 min
    Illumination with Rebecca Li: A Guide to the Buddhist Method of No-Method

    Illumination with Rebecca Li: A Guide to the Buddhist Method of No-Method

    In this episode, I welcome back Rebecca Li to talk about her new book, Illumination: A Guide to the Buddhist Method of No Method. Rebecca and I had a conversation in May of 2021, about her previous book, Allow Joy into Our Hearts: Chan Practice in Uncertain Times.
    Rebecca is a meditation and Dharma teacher in the lineage of Chan Master Sheng Yen and founder and guiding teacher of Chan Dharma Community, a Chan Buddhist practice and study community made up of individuals committed to cultivating wisdom and compassion for the benefit of all beings.
    Rebecca has two decades of Dharma and meditation teaching experience, leading retreats or teaching at Buddhist centers in North America, Europe, and Asia. She has been featured in several Buddhist publications, including Tricycle, Lion's Roar, and Buddhadharma. 

    She is also one of the founding board members of The GenX Buddhist Teachers Sangha where she continues to serve as a board member. Rebecca is a sociology professor and lives with her husband in New Jersey.
    In Allow Joy into Our Hearts, Rebecca wrote about Chan Practice and she continues to teach the path of Chan Buddhism in the book we will discuss today, Illumination. In Illumination, she dives deeper into the Chan meditation of Silent Illumination and deeper still into what causes our suffering and how Silent Illumination can help us identify and help decrease the causes of our suffering.
    In her book, Rebecca takes us on a fascinating, deep-dive into the method of no method in silent illumination and guides us in the mechanics of this type of practice. In our conversation we talked about, among other things:
    How, in our meditation, we turn thoughts into enemies, rather than allowing thoughts and feelings to be fully experienced and felt …

    About how tend to try to "achieve" as meditators, as if a sport …

    And about the modes of operation: craving, aversion, trance, problem-solving, intellectualizing, quietism, and forgetting-emptiness …  
    Buy the book (Amazon affiliate link):
    Illumination: A Guide to the Method of No-Method
     
    Learn more about Rebecca Li and her Dharma talks, guided meditation offerings, and retreats:
    https://rebeccali.org/
     

     

     
    *Special Everyday Buddhism Substack / Words From My Teachers podcast subscription promo code:
    Redeem by 3/31/2024 for 20% subscription for 1 year!
     
    Become a patron to support this podcast and get special member benefits, including a membership community and virtual sangha:
    https://www.patreon.com/EverydayBuddhism
     
    Join the Everyday Sangha:
    Join the Everyday Sangha
     
    Join the Membership Community:
    https://donorbox.org/membershipcommunity
     
    Register for the Introduction to Buddhism Course (by February 22, 2024):
    Register for the Introduction to Buddhism course
     
    If this podcast has helped you understand Buddhism or help in your everyday life, consider making a one-time donation here:
    https://donorbox.org/podcast-donations

     

    Support the podcast through the affiliate link to buy the book, Everyday Buddhism: Real-Life Buddhist Teachings & Practices for Real Change: Buy the book, Everyday Buddhism

    • 1 hr 23 min
    BONUS - Purposeless Purpose: From Episode 6 of "Words From My Teachers"

    BONUS - Purposeless Purpose: From Episode 6 of "Words From My Teachers"

    This week, over at my new premium Substack podcast, Words From My Teachers, I released Episode 6, continuing readings from the book, The Center Within by Rev. Gyomay Kubose. In the episode I read the following essays: Middle Way, Water, Purposeless Purpose, No Mind, and How the Buddha Taught.
    As a special bonus episode for the Everyday Buddhism podcast, I am sharing the reading of the essay Purposeless Purpose. It's a wonderful essay to reflect on, as they all are in The Center Within, but I'm releasing it here on the Everyday Buddhism podcast as a companion piece to Episode 103.

     
    Become a patron to support this podcast and get special member benefits, including a membership community and virtual sangha:
    https://www.patreon.com/EverydayBuddhism
     
    If this podcast has helped you understand Buddhism or help in your everyday life, consider making a one-time donation here:
    https://donorbox.org/podcast-donations


     
    Subscribe to my premium Substack feed and podcast, Words From My Teachers:
    Subscribe to "Words From My Teachers"
     
    Support the podcast through the affiliate link to buy the book, Everyday Buddhism: Real-Life Buddhist Teachings & Practices for Real Change: Buy the book, Everyday Buddhism

    • 7 min
    Purposeless Purpose: Why Nonsense Makes the Most Sense Redux

    Purposeless Purpose: Why Nonsense Makes the Most Sense Redux

    As a special bonus episode for the Everyday Buddhism podcast, I am sharing the reading of the essay Purposeless Purpose. It's a wonderful essay to reflect on, as they all are in The Center Within, but I'm releasing it here on the Everyday Buddhism podcast as a companion piece, which you will find in the next episode, 104.
    But as a special introduction to the bonus episode, I am adding new content in this re-release of an episode I did in June of 2022, called Why Nonsense Makes the Most Sense, which was built on the essay, Purposeless Purpose.
    The new addition is some insight about meditation that is related to the purposeless-purpose message.

     
    Become a patron to support this podcast and get special member benefits, including a membership community and virtual sangha:
    https://www.patreon.com/EverydayBuddhism
     
    If this podcast has helped you understand Buddhism or help in your everyday life, consider making a one-time donation here:
    https://donorbox.org/podcast-donations


     
    Find out more and register for the Introduction to Buddhism course:
    Introduction to Buddhism course information and registration
     
    Join the Everyday Buddhism Membership Community:
    Join the Membership Community
     
    Join the Everyday Sangha:
    Join the Everyday Sangha
     
    Subscribe to my premium Substack feed and podcast, Words From My Teachers:
    Subscribe to "Words From My Teachers"
     
    Support the podcast through the affiliate link to buy the book, Everyday Buddhism: Real-Life Buddhist Teachings & Practices for Real Change: Buy the book, Everyday Buddhism

    • 32 min
    The Boundless Heart of Bodhicitta

    The Boundless Heart of Bodhicitta

    In the spirit of the holiday season, I am re-releasing a popular episode from 2019: The Boundless Heart - Bodhicitta. It is my wish that we all try to practice being a Bodhisattva during this holiday season … Starting with me! ;)
    Stating the obvious, it's been a rough 7 years or so. Years marked by war, pandemic, social injustice, tribalism and, overall, something called "high conflict" made popular by Amanda Ripley's book of the same name, where conflict is the ruling energy and that leads to the stress, fear, anxiousness, and despair most of us have been feeling. She writes:
    The challenge of our time is to mobilize great masses of people to make change without dehumanizing one another. Not just because it’s morally right but because it works. Lasting change, the kind that seeps into people’s hearts, has only ever come about through a combination of pressure and good conflict. Both matter. That’s why, over the course of history, nonviolent movements have been more than twice as likely to succeed as violent ones.
    It with this in mind I offer the replay of this 2019 episode, a reflection on bodhicitta, the good heart—something we can all practice even if we don't participate in nonviolent movements or the "good conflict" Amanda Ripley refers to.
    I know it's been far too easy for me to react in anger when I'm really just afraid and to dismiss instead of disagreeing, which is a dehumanizing activity. So, in the spirit of holiday peace, good will, and reflection, I will remember the bodhicitta.
    Bodhicitta characterizes the path of a Mahayana practitioner. It is Bodhicitta that creates a Bodhisattva and it is Bodhicitta that ultimately creates a Buddha.
    In Tibetan, compassion is translated as the nobility or greatness of heart which implies wisdom, discernment, empathy, unselfishness, and abundant kindness. Bodhicitta is compassion working with a mind awakened by right view. It is the joining of compassion and emptiness.
    We'll examine how to use the Four Bodhisattva Vows to supercharge Right Intention with Right View and discover the same spacious freedom of a flower that blooms despite its circumstances.
    Please join me as you listen to this "best of" episode.
     
    Book by Amanda Ripley referenced in podcast (Amazon affiliate link):
    High Conflict: Why We Get Trapped and How We Get Out
     
     

     
    Become a patron to support this podcast and get special member benefits, including a membership community and virtual sangha:
    https://www.patreon.com/EverydayBuddhism
     
    If this podcast has helped you understand Buddhism or help in your everyday life, consider making a one-time donation here:
    https://donorbox.org/podcast-donations

     

    Subscribe to my premium Substack feed and podcast, Words From My Teachers:
    Subscribe to "Words From My Teachers"
     
    Support the podcast through the affiliate link to buy the book, Everyday Buddhism: Real-Life Buddhist Teachings & Practices for Real Change: Buy the book, Everyday Buddhism

    • 39 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
29 Ratings

29 Ratings

Pesusa ,

Down to Earth No-Nonsense Buddhism we can all relate to

I have watched this podcast evolve from the early days, and also watched Wendy develop with the show to result in a wonderfully down to earth podcast that never fails to give me some wise teaching or advice to make my life a little bit more painless.
Wendy thoroughly researches her guests’ publications before interviewing the authors, and never fails to pick out golden nuggets of wisdom that resonate with anyone who is undergoing the human existence and looking for a more straightforward solution. Her own generous sharing of sometimes incredibly painful experiences to deliver home a teaching makes it all real to me. Thank you Wendy. Keep on keeping on making everyday better 😉

Sue.F ,

Zen at the sharp end

Love Wendy’s authenticity & style. Thank you 🙏

Anonymous1982111 ,

A very chatty type podast with enough wisdom to help make your every day better

Wendy shinyo haylett has to be one of my favourite podcasts hosts out there. Being down to earth and knowing her stuff she takes us on a journey through buddhism and lets us know the secrets of engaging with the teachings on a day to day level.

A very chatty type podast with enough wisdom to help make your every day better. I believe this way of hosting a podcast is the best way. If your looking for a very stale and linear approach of buddhism you might want to go else where, but if you want to learn alot of wisdom and enjoy a great podcast you should give it a listen.

Anyone of the secular mind can take these steps and teachings and apply it to there day to day life.

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