382 episodes

On each episode of the Food Matters Live podcast we dive deeper into the unanswered questions shaping the food and drink landscape. Expect to hear from industry leaders, influencers and innovators on the ground driving the change each and every day.


Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter by tagging us @foodmatterslive or keep up to date with the podcast on https://www.foodmatterslive.com.

Food Matters Live Podcast Food Matters Live

    • Arts
    • 4.8 • 19 Ratings

On each episode of the Food Matters Live podcast we dive deeper into the unanswered questions shaping the food and drink landscape. Expect to hear from industry leaders, influencers and innovators on the ground driving the change each and every day.


Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter by tagging us @foodmatterslive or keep up to date with the podcast on https://www.foodmatterslive.com.

    Investment trends - where's the smart money heading in the food industry?

    Investment trends - where's the smart money heading in the food industry?

    In this episode of the Food Matters Live podcast we are following the money, looking ahead and asking where investors will be putting their cash in 2023.

    It is not necessarily a straightforward question, the world continues to be a complex place.

    We have had heatwaves and floods, inflation is causing economic turmoil all over the place, and the ongoing conflict in Ukraine is causing global turbulence as well as devastation for the people and the industry in that country.

    So what does this mean for investors? Is food and agri-tech still a good bet?

    If we had recorded this episode 12 months ago, alternative meat and ag-tech would be two of the big hits rising up the investment charts.   

    But there are signs of a slow down in both these areas.

    So where are the sharp-eyed investors looking as 2023 approaches? And where is the smart money heading?

    Guests:
    Andrew Ive, Founder, Big Idea Ventures
    Ivan Farneti, Managing Partner, Five Seasons Ventures

    • 49 min
    The ingredients for launching a successful coffee brand

    The ingredients for launching a successful coffee brand

    Launching and establishing a successful coffee brand is no mean feat.

    There are plenty of well-established brands already in the market and finding space for a new one presents a whole host of challenges.

    Will Little, Managing Director of Little's Coffee, puts the success of his brand down to a quality product, honesty, and most importantly, passion.

    In this episodes of the Career Conversations podcast series, Will reveals all about his journey from being a graphic designer to where he is today.

    He speaks about how to get your product on supermarket shelves, the importance of strong branding, and his ambitions for the future.

    Sign up for the next Inspiring Careers in Food events in 2023

    Will Little, Managing Director, Little's Coffee

    As managing Director of Little’s Coffee and co-founder of Roastworks Coffee Co., Will Little has clocked up an impressive 12 years of experience at the helm of some of the most innovative and quality-driven coffee companies in the UK.

    With a background in Graphic Design, Will’s main focus now is his family business; Little’s Coffee, which he runs with his wife Caroline. Together they’ve taken the business from humble beginnings and built arguably the most exciting challenger brand in the category that is challenging the status quo with their innovative flavoured coffees.

    Having gained listings in Sainsbury’s, Waitrose, and Tesco, Little’s Coffee is here to turn up the flavour, level up on quality and put our planet first.

    Will believes you should have coffee your way not the way, and that quality and convenience shouldn’t be mutually exclusive.

    • 32 min
    Shift work and nutrition - a marriage of inconvenience

    Shift work and nutrition - a marriage of inconvenience

    Anyone who has worked irregular hours knows that the world is built around daytime eating, not just in the home, but at shops, cafes, restaurants and canteens.

    But there are millions of us working rotating shifts, nightshifts and irregular hours.

    And when the shops are shut, and decent food is in short supply, we tend to reach all too often for those quick fixes – the crisps and the chocolate bars.

    Vending machines at dark, deserted bus stations can tide us over until the next meal.  
    Shift work has long been associated with negative health outcomes, but does when we eat matter as much as what we eat?

    And considering all of that, is it really possible for most people to separate the two?

    What can shift workers do to make healthy lifestyle choices? And what solutions could the food industry offer?

    Guests:
    Professor Alexandra Johnstone, The Rowett Institute, University of Aberdeen
    Dr Sally Wilson, Principal Research Fellow, Institute for Employment Studies

    • 34 min
    Is plant-based always better for you - and the planet?

    Is plant-based always better for you - and the planet?

    Plant-based meat alternatives are supposed to be better for the planet and they are supposed to be good for you.

    But as they have grown in popularity, there are claims from some quarters that there is something of a halo effect at play, and that some of these health and environmental claims do not quite stack up.

    Evidence is offered which mentions the nutritional shortcomings of plant-based processed foods, as well as the carbon footprint being far higher than vegetables or legumes.   

    In the midst of a climate crisis, where greenwashing is commonplace, this stuff really matters and it can be hard to cut through the noise to get to the facts.

    Which is where today's guest on the Food Matters Live podcast, Chris Bryant comes in, he has reviewed a host of previous studies to see where we are up to.

    Dr Chris Bryant, Research Associate, University of Bath - Director, Bryant Research

    Chris Bryant PhD is a social scientist and an expert on alternative protein markets and marketing. He is a Research Associate at the University of Bath.

    He has published several papers on consumer acceptance of cultivated meat, plant-based meat, and fermentation-derived animal product alternatives. 

    Through his company, Bryant Research Ltd, he works with alternative protein companies and non-profits, including Formo, Ivy Farm Technologies, Aleph Farms, Wild Type, and the Good Food Institute.

    • 25 min
    How you could help fix the global food system

    How you could help fix the global food system

    "We have a growing population, lots of changes in the climate, lots of greenhouse gas emissions which are jeopardising our food production, and we are at risk of not being able to feed the world."

    Natalia Falagán, Lecturer in Food Science and Technology, Cranfield University, succinctly sets out some of the major issues the world is facing, and why students are queuing up to enrol on her courses.

    Enthusiasm for the subject is key, she says, and students "will get that enthusiasm and passion back from the lecturers".

    In this episode of the Career Conversations podcast series, made in partnership with Cranfield University, we delve into the detail of what the courses cover and how they can set students on the path to a rewarding career.

    Cranfield's Masters in Future Food Sustainability is described as taking a whole system approach to solving some of the biggest challenges facing the global food system.

    Natalia says usually food people look at food, energy people look at energy, and water people look at water. "That's not going to take us anywhere," she says. "We need co-operation."

    That co-operative approach presents itself in a number of different ways. One of the key elements of the course is the opportunity to work alongside industry.

    Students work with Cranfield's industry partners to ensure they get real world experience and a real sense of what is actually happening on the ground.

    Another key element is the group project, where students work alongside others on different Masters courses at Cranfield to solve a problem posed by an industry partner or academic. 

    Natalia says this helps students develop crucial soft skills, as well as broadening their knowledge base.

    Kate Jones studied on the course in 2021-22, leaving behind her job and salary.

    Despite the risk, she says she felt confident taking the leap "because I was following my passion. I knew there would be an answer at the end of it".

    Future Food Sustainability MSc at a glance

    Duration: One year full-time, two or three years part-time

    Who it's for: Graduates who are passionate about food production and the sustainability of our food system.

    Potential future roles: Technical managers, sustainability managers, technical development managers, product technologists, resilience officers, supply chain/logistics analysts, commodity analysts, regulatory affairs advisers, and policy officers.

    Find out more and apply

    Cranfield also runs a Masters in Food Systems and Management, which is slightly more technical.

    Natalia says students often go on to work in quality and safety of food products, as well as certification.

    Food Systems and Management MSc at a glance

    Duration: One year full-time, two or three years part-time

    Who it's for: Science or technology graduates, or professionals already in the food industry looking to further their career. You will be passionate about improving major worldwide problems such as food security and food safety.

    Potential future roles: Management, food innovation, production, logistics, research or academia, retail sector, food storage.

    Find out more and apply

    Listen to the full episode to find out more about the big challenges facing the global food system, what life is like on the Cranfield University campus, and how you might go about choosing which course is right for you.

    Natalia Falagán, Lecturer in Food Science and Technology, Cranfield University

    Dr Natalia Falagan is an agricultural engineer by training and is driven by the need to reduce food waste and improve food security; while maintaining the quality and safety of fresh produce across the supply chain. 

    Her work focuses on optimising food systems from an integrated perspective, considering the impacts on the environment to develop mitigating actions for a more sustainable and resilient supply chain. 

    In particular, she investigates the underlying ripening and senescence mechanisms of fruit and vegetables and develops innovative strategies for post

    • 28 min
    How can we get more fibre into our diets?

    How can we get more fibre into our diets?

    When it comes to fibre, the fact is we are not getting enough of it.

    Across most of the Western world, there is a lack of adequate fibre in our diets and that is contributing to health problems.

    In the UK, the Government says we are consuming an average of 20 grams per day, but we should be consuming 30 grams. And it is similar around the world.

    But why is fibre lacking in so many countries, across different cultures and diets? And why does it matter?

    In this episode of the Food Matters Live podcast, made in partnership with Puratos, we take a look at the innovations that are out there in the food industry, helping us to increase our fibre intake.

    There used to be a view that fibre did not really do much, that our bodies could not digest it and it just sailed through.  

    Thankfully, because of a wealth of scientific research, that view has been comprehensively debunked and we are learning even more about its benefits.

    Fibre is crucial to maintaining our health, in particular a healthy digestive system.

    Adequate fibre intake is associated with good health, and a lack of fibre is a risk factor for a number of diseases, including heart disease, diabetes, and colon cancer.

    A global study in 2017 estimated that 100,000 deaths per year can be linked to poor fibre intake.

    All of which leads to the question: How can we get more fibre into our diets?  

    Puratos

    Puratos’ journey started in Belgium in 1919, and has evolved from a father-and-son start-up to a successful international business. 

    The company is now in 81 countries to date and has 93 innovation centres, offering a full range of cutting-edge services and the best quality ingredients to customers in bakery, patisserie and chocolate.

    Innovation and people have always been key motivators for Puratos, whether that is working with artisans, retailers or food-service enterprises of any size, its focus is on ‘Food Innovation for Good’. 

    This is evident within the Happy Gut bakery products range, which includes specific types of fibres to support consumers’ gut health.  

    Learn more about how Puratos supports customer success.

    Guests:
    James Slater, Director of Research and Development for Puratos UK
    Dr Raluca Florea, Gut Health Lead, Puratos
    Phil Metcalfe, Managing Director Biopower Technologies Limited

    • 33 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
19 Ratings

19 Ratings

Kitchen Guru-Murthy ,

Great insights from the food industry

Great podcast, offering a wide breadth of insights into the food industry.

Everest Chin ,

Making Data Sexy

Great episode on product data with brilliant panel. Loved Dan Sands- “it’s all about trust”! So true! Would like to see him become a regular guest.

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