200 episodes

For some, watching paint dry, or a poke in the eye is better than dealing with their business numbers. I get it, numbers can be scary, confusing, and boring, not what your business is meant to be about.

But here’s the thing. If you’re serious about your business, you need to grab hold of your numbers, and connect with them. Falling in love with them may feel weird, but at least be on friendly terms with them if you want your business to survive and thrive.

Numbers make you accountable, showing you the financial impact of your successes, a route map to success and highlighting those flip-ups. Above all, learning to love & use your numbers means you have a better chance of making money, what’s not to love.

Fundamentally business is there to make money. You need to make money to survive and have impact. It’s about knowing how your future is going to pan out.

As a business finance coach, financial story teller and tax advisor, I've helped thousands of businesses over the years.

I love numbers, but I get it that not many businesses will do so. I want to share my love of numbers through my podcast, to make it accessible, to help you and your business power forward.

My aim is to make this podcast listener friendly, jargon and BS free.

In the words of W.E.B. Dubois “When you have mastered numbers, you will in fact no longer be reading numbers, any more than you read words when reading books. You will be reading meanings.”

This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

I Hate Numbers: Business Improvement and Performance I Hate Numbers

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 15 Ratings

For some, watching paint dry, or a poke in the eye is better than dealing with their business numbers. I get it, numbers can be scary, confusing, and boring, not what your business is meant to be about.

But here’s the thing. If you’re serious about your business, you need to grab hold of your numbers, and connect with them. Falling in love with them may feel weird, but at least be on friendly terms with them if you want your business to survive and thrive.

Numbers make you accountable, showing you the financial impact of your successes, a route map to success and highlighting those flip-ups. Above all, learning to love & use your numbers means you have a better chance of making money, what’s not to love.

Fundamentally business is there to make money. You need to make money to survive and have impact. It’s about knowing how your future is going to pan out.

As a business finance coach, financial story teller and tax advisor, I've helped thousands of businesses over the years.

I love numbers, but I get it that not many businesses will do so. I want to share my love of numbers through my podcast, to make it accessible, to help you and your business power forward.

My aim is to make this podcast listener friendly, jargon and BS free.

In the words of W.E.B. Dubois “When you have mastered numbers, you will in fact no longer be reading numbers, any more than you read words when reading books. You will be reading meanings.”

This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

    Kindness in Business: Embracing Empathy for Maximum Impact

    Kindness in Business: Embracing Empathy for Maximum Impact

    When you think about kindness, do you believe it applies in business, or do you assume you need to be ruthless, wear sharp suits, and tread over anyone in your way? Or do you think otherwise? In this week's I Hate Numbers podcast, we explore the place of kindness in business and whether it truly belongs there.
    The Essence of KindnessSpoiler alert: kindness does have a place in business. But what exactly is kindness? Why is kindness not a weakness but a superpower? And how can we practice kindness in our business? Let's dive in and explore these concepts.
    Defining Kindness in BusinessWhen we think about kindness, we might envision helping people across the road, being kind to animals, and generally being nice and pleasant. While this is a reasonable definition, in business it extends beyond that. It involves treating others with respect, understanding, empathy, and care. Additionally, it means being direct and honest without being overly critical.
    Kindness: A Strength, Not a WeaknessAlthough some might mistake kindness for weakness, it actually requires strength and courage to demonstrate it in business. Kindness is about building trust, which is the foundation of any successful business. When we are kind, we build loyalty with our team, clients, and partners, leading to long-term success.
    Building Trust and LoyaltyTrust and loyalty are essential in business. They ensure that customers return, staff stay committed, and employees go the extra mile. A strong foundation of kindness fosters positive interactions with everyone involved in the business, from team members to suppliers and customers.
    Constructive FeedbackKindness in business also means having direct and honest conversations. This doesn't mean being rude or aggressive, but rather providing constructive feedback and being honest. People appreciate honesty and prefer constructive feedback, which helps them grow and improve.
    Customer RelationsIn customer relations, kindness plays a significant role. Customers remember how you make them feel more than the service you provide. A kind approach to customer service, managing boundaries carefully, and being straightforward with customers enhances their overall experience.
    Stress ReductionKindness can also be a great stress reliever. The business world can be stressful, and having a positive, kind outlook can reduce stress, improving overall well-being and physical health. A welcoming environment is more conducive to productivity and satisfaction than one filled with tension.
    Practicing Kindness in BusinessPracticing kindness in business is fundamental and must be genuine. Small, sincere acts of kindness can make a significant difference. Active listening, showing appreciation, being empathetic, and offering help where needed are simple ways to incorporate kindness into daily business practices.
    Effective CommunicationClear, open, and respectful communication is crucial. Avoid ambiguity and ensure your communication is honest and direct. This helps in building a positive working environment and fosters better relationships.
    ConclusionKindness in business is a powerful tool that builds trust, creates a positive working environment, fosters teamwork, improves customer relations, reduces stress, and encourages personal growth. Far from being a weakness, kindness is a strength that drives

    • 8 min
    Tax Efficiency : A Comprehensive Guide for Employers

    Tax Efficiency : A Comprehensive Guide for Employers

    IntroductionTax efficiency and tax planning are crucial for all businesses, whether private or non-profit. Additionally, one key area offering significant opportunities is benefit planning. Specifically, benefit planning allows you to remunerate your staff, including yourself as a business owner, in the most tax-efficient way.
    The Importance of Benefits in KindWhy Benefits in Kind Are UsefulFirstly, benefits in kind provide a tax-efficient way to reward employees. Whether you run a private company, a charity, or a social enterprise, offering benefits can lead to tax savings.
    Tax Efficiency for Employers and EmployeesConsider this scenario: an employee wants to go to the gym monthly. Consequently, the employee would have to pay from their post-tax income. However, if the employer covers this cost, it can be more tax-efficient for both parties. Employers can also avoid paying extra National Insurance contributions on top of gross wages.
    Examples of Tax-Free BenefitsPensionsPension contributions made by your company are a tax-efficient way to save for the future. Moreover, these contributions are deductible against corporation tax profits, benefiting both the employee and the company.
    Mobile Phones and TechnologyEmployers can provide mobile phones, laptops, and smartphones. These items, provided through company contracts, are tax-free benefits and valuable tools for employees.
    Workplace Parking and Health BenefitsOffering free parking is another tax-efficient benefit. Additionally, employers can provide health screening and medical checkups, promoting employee well-being.
    Trivial BenefitsTrivial benefits, costing £50 or less, can be provided tax-free under certain conditions. They must not be cash or cash vouchers and should not be performance rewards. For company directors, there's a £300 limit per tax year.
    The Advantages of Offering BenefitsBusiness Expenses DeductionEmployers can deduct the cost of these benefits as business expenses, reducing overall tax liability. Furthermore, providing these benefits boosts employee satisfaction and retention.
    Tax-Efficient Remuneration StrategyEmployers can remunerate staff without the additional burden of National Insurance and tax. Consequently, this approach is beneficial for both the employer and the employee.
    ConclusionIn conclusion, tax-efficient benefit planning is a strategic way to reward employees. Whether you run a private company, charity, or social enterprise, consider incorporating benefits in kind into your remuneration strategy.
    Call to ActionListen to the I Hate Numbers podcast for more insights and tips on maximizing your business's tax efficiency. Join our Numbers Know How community and take advantage of our resources to help your business thrive.
    Explore our FREE Online Business Calculators


    This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

    Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

    • 9 min
    Benefits in Kind - Your Tax Strategy Upgrade!

    Benefits in Kind - Your Tax Strategy Upgrade!

    At "I Hate Numbers," we emphasize the critical role of tax planning for business owners and employers alike. Managing taxes efficiently isn't just a legal obligation—it's a strategic imperative. Today, we delve into a powerful yet often overlooked strategy: benefits in kind.
    What are Benefits in Kind?Benefits in kind are non-cash perks provided to employees, such as company cars, medical insurance, and even housing. These perks hold a monetary value but aren't part of the standard salary package. The appeal? They offer tax advantages, particularly by sidestepping Employee's National Insurance, making them a valuable tool for both companies and employees.
    Merits of Adopting Benefits in KindTax Efficiency: By offering benefits in kind like gym memberships or health insurance, companies can achieve significant tax savings. For instance, funding personal expenses through benefits in kind can be more tax-efficient than taking equivalent cash from the company.
    Cost Efficiency: Negotiating bulk discounts for corporate benefits, proves cheaper for companies compared to individuals. This approach not only saves costs but also enhances employee satisfaction.
    Employee Satisfaction and Retention: Beyond monetary compensation, benefits in kind play a pivotal role in enhancing employee satisfaction and retention. Offering perks like flexible working arrangements or professional development can differentiate your company in a competitive job market.
    Comparison with Salary and DividendsWhile the traditional route of salary and dividends is common for private companies, it has limitations. Dividends depend on company profits and lack tax-deductible benefits, unlike benefits in kind. This makes benefits in kind a more flexible and imaginative option for remuneration.
    Tax-Free Benefits ExamplesCertain benefits, such as mobile phones and work-based parking, can be provided tax-free to employees. These exemptions benefit both employers and employees, enhancing overall compensation packages without incurring additional tax burdens.
    ConclusionIn conclusion, incorporating benefits in kind into your tax planning strategy can lead to substantial benefits for your business and employees alike. To learn more about maximizing your tax efficiency and enhancing employee satisfaction through benefits in kind, tune in to the "I Hate Numbers" podcast. Join our community and start planning your taxes smarter today!


    This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

    Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

    • 11 min
    Business Success: Defining, Achieving, and Avoiding Pitfalls

    Business Success: Defining, Achieving, and Avoiding Pitfalls

    Welcome to this week's episode of the I Hate Numbers Podcast, where we explore business success. We discuss what success means, how to achieve it, and common pitfalls to avoid. Notably, success differs for each of us; hence, defining it personally is crucial. Therefore, let's focus on crafting our unique vision of success, planning smartly, and building a resilient mindset.
    Defining Business SuccessBusiness success is subjective. Correspondingly, it is essential to clarify what success looks like for each of us. We must consider what we want to achieve within the next 1 to 3 years. Moreover, we should determine if success means balancing lifestyle, reaching revenue targets, or having a global impact. Explicitly, our idea of success should not mirror someone else's vision.
    Setting SMART ObjectivesOnce we have our vision, setting SMART objectives is the next step. Specifically, SMART stands for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound goals. For instance, if our aim is to generate £100,000 in profit, we should assess our current position, available resources, and the timeline to achieve this. Similarly, breaking down long-term goals into actionable steps helps keep us on track. Ultimately, these objectives ensure we stay focused and measure our progress meaningfully.
    Cultivating the Right MindsetEqually important is our mindset. While having a growth mindset allows us to explore new opportunities and take calculated risks, a fixed mindset can hinder our progress. Moreover, we should be ready to learn from mistakes and setbacks, which are inevitable in any business journey. Therefore, we must remain resilient, avoiding excessive self-criticism, and always move forward.
    Planning and Avoiding PitfallsEffective planning is crucial for business success. Therefore, we need to prepare detailed plans that include end goals, required resources, and marketing strategies. Additionally, we should be aware of common pitfalls, such as inadequate market research, weak operational planning, and poor credit control. By addressing these issues, we can better navigate the challenges of running a business.
    The Pros and Cons of Self-EmploymentSelf-employment offers flexibility, varied work, and potential for higher earnings. However, we must also consider its challenges, including transitioning from employment, aligning resources with expectations, and maintaining thorough market research. Altogether, being aware of these factors helps us prepare for the realities of working for ourselves.
    ConclusionBusiness success combines a clear vision, SMART objectives, a growth mindset, and robust planning. By focusing on these areas, we can navigate our path to success effectively. Finally, we invite you to listen to the I Hate Numbers Podcast for more insights on achieving business success.
    Feel free to join the Numbers Know How community for additional resources and support. Tune in to our podcast for more tips and strategies!


    This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

    Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

    • 8 min
    4 Business Myths You Must Ignore – Here’s Why

    4 Business Myths You Must Ignore – Here’s Why

    In this week’s episode of the "I Hate Numbers" podcast, we tackle common business myths. These beliefs often mislead and hinder progress. We explore which beliefs to discard and why.
    What is a Belief?Firstly, let's clarify what a belief is. According to Wikipedia, a belief is a subjective attitude that a proposition is true. Basically, this means beliefs can be either true or false. However, in business, myths masquerading as beliefs can be especially dangerous.
    Myths in BusinessMyth 1: Waiting for the Right TimeMany think they should wait for the right time to start a business or launch a product. Nevertheless, there is no perfect time. Instead, planning and adapting quickly is essential. Moreover, starting sooner allows us to gather real feedback and refine our approach, e.g., Microsoft's iterative method demonstrates this well.
    Myth 2: Passion Alone is EnoughCertainly, passion is crucial. Nonetheless, relying solely on passion can cloud judgment. Passion should be balanced with strategic planning and market awareness. Otherwise, poor decisions and misallocated resources can result. Additionally, successful businesses combine passion with facts and data.
    Myth 3: Complete Knowledge is NecessaryThere's a common myth that complete knowledge is needed before starting. However, this isn’t practical. Correspondingly, learning as we go is vital. Moreover, accessing a support network and seeking advice can greatly aid our journey.
    Myth 4: Doing Everything YourselfLastly, some believe they must do everything themselves to save money. Conversely, this can be inefficient. Outsourcing and delegating tasks to experts can often yield better results. Furthermore, it’s a wise use of time and resources to focus on our strengths.
    ConclusionIn summary, challenging these myths can significantly enhance business success. Thus, we encourage you to reflect on these points. Are there any other myths you’ve encountered? Feel free to share them with us! Finally, don’t miss our next episode and remember to listen to the "I Hate Numbers" podcast. Check the Numbers Know How community for more insights and resources.


    This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

    Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

    • 8 min
    What is Depreciation?

    What is Depreciation?

    In this episode of the I Hate Numbers podcast, we explain what depreciation is and its importance in business. Albeit often misunderstood,  it is crucial for accurately determining profitability. Essentially, we clarify that it is not merely a reflection of value loss but rather an allocation of the asset's cost over its useful life. Subsequently, we discuss how businesses categorize expenses into revenue and capital, identifying the latter as subject to depreciation. Specifically, we outline two primary methods of calculating depreciation: the straight-line method and the reducing balance method, offering practical examples for each.
    Key ConceptsRevenue vs. Capital ExpensesBefore exploring what depreciation is, we differentiate between revenue and capital expenses. Revenue expenses are daily operational costs such as hiring staff or buying food. Conversely, capital expenses include investments in infrastructure like equipment or buildings, vital for generating revenue but not intended for immediate sale.
    What Depreciation IsDepreciation involves spreading the cost of fixed assets over their useful lives, thus aligning expenses with revenue generation. Hence, we clarify that it is not about the asset's current market value but its cost allocation.
    Calculation MethodsWe explore two main methods:
    Straight-Line Method: Allocates depreciation evenly across the asset’s lifespan.Reducing Balance Method: Allocates more depreciation in earlier years, reflecting higher initial usage and diminishing benefits over time.
    Impact on Financial StatementsDepreciation affects the income statement and balance sheet. However, it does not impact cash flow directly, though it is crucial for accurate profit reporting.
    ConclusionOverall, understanding what depreciation is helps in better financial management and accurate profit calculation. Therefore, it’s essential to grasp its role in aligning costs with revenue over time.
    Listen to the full episode of the I Hate Numbers podcast to enhance your financial insights. Share your thoughts, and visit our online financial planning platform for additional resources.


    This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

    Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

    • 13 min

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" I Hate Numbers deserves a solid five stars! This podcast was an invaluable resource for me whilst studying an IWFM qualification . The insights and practical tips shared in each episode made complex concepts easy to understand and apply. Thanks to Mahmood’s expertise, I gained a deeper understanding of financial management. I highly recommend this podcast to anyone looking to enhance their financial management skills."

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Really I love this podcast because it is a very informative podcast for business growth

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