32 episodes

Welcome to all English language learners and teachers to languagecaster.com and its free football podcast. Every week a new soccer show complete with language support for students who wish to improve their English language skills.

Learn English Through Football languagecaster.com

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Welcome to all English language learners and teachers to languagecaster.com and its free football podcast. Every week a new soccer show complete with language support for students who wish to improve their English language skills.

    Chalked off – Football Language Podcast: 2021 WSL Man City v Spurs

    Chalked off – Football Language Podcast: 2021 WSL Man City v Spurs

    In this football language podcast we look at the phrases ‘chalked off” and ‘the goal stands‘ which appeared on the BBC report on the Manchester City versus Tottenham game from the Women’s Super League. You can read a transcript for this podcast below, while you can also check out our glossary of footballing phrases here and visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions or questions then you can contact us at admin@languagecaster.com.

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    Football Language Podcast: 2021 WSL Man City v Spurs

    DF: Hello everyone, this is Damian from the Languagecaster.com team – I hope you are all doing well. Now, on this short football language podcast, we look at the phrases ‘chalked off” and ‘the goal should not have stood‘  which both appeared in the BBC match report on the Tottenham win at Manchester City in theWwomen’s Super League last weekend.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (Dulwich Hamlet fan).

    Chalked off

    This quote is from the Manchester City manager Gareth Taylor who was clearly upset about the controversial winning goal for Spurs. He uses the phrase ‘chalked off’ which is another phrase for disallowing or ruling out the goal. He wanted the goal to be chalked off by the referee as he felt there had been a clear handball by the Spurs player.

    The goal shouldn’t have stood

    The Manchester City manager goes on to say that the goal should not have stood which means it should not have been allowed. We use the verb ‘to stand’ when describing whether a goal has been given, it’s legal or if it counts, so for example, ‘despite the protests from the Manchester City players, the goal stood‘. In the Guardian report on the same game the following sentence uses both examples from today’s podcast: ‘The goal should have been chalked off but the referee, (Abigail Byrne), let it stand.’

    Here’s another example, this time from the Manchester Evening News from July 2021: ‘Denmark’s opening goal against England should not have stood according to the laws of the game’ which means that the Danish goal should not have been allowed; it should have been disallowed.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in German).

    Good Bye

    DF: Yes, you are listening to languagecaster.

    • 2 min
    Tap in – Football Language: 2021-22 Season: Leeds vs Liverpool

    Tap in – Football Language: 2021-22 Season: Leeds vs Liverpool

    This football language podcast looks back at one of the matches from match week four in the Premier League 2021-22 season. We focus on the the three goals scored by Liverpool, including Mo Salah’s 100th goal in the Premier League. You can read a transcript for this podcast below, while you can also check out our glossary of footballing phrases here and visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions or questions then you can contact us at admin@languagecaster.com. (DB=Damon)

    Tap in – Football Language: 2021-22 Season: Leeds vs Liverpool

    DB: You’re listening to languagecaster.com’s football language 2021-2022 season podcast. Hello there everyone, my name’s Damon, one half of the Languagecaster team. Of course, regular listeners know that Damian is the half of the team, and while I am based in Tokyo, he is based in London.

    Right, today I’ll be talking about some football language from the Leeds versus Liverpool match from last Sunday. The reason I chose this is that Mo Salah reached an amazing landmark by scoring his 100th Premier league goal, and he is the 5th fastest to ever do that.

    Of course, the Return of Christiano Ronaldo was also big news this weekend, and Damian has taken a look at that story and some football language. Check out that post – Golden return of Ronaldo – by coming along to our site at languagecaster.com.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in Urdu).

    DB: OK, let’s turn to the football language and we’ll use the BBC match report and start with this paragraph.

    Egyptian forward Salah was perfectly placed to tap in Trent Alexander-Arnold’s low cross and give the Reds a 20th-minute advantage, with Fabinho bundling home the second following a corner five minutes after the break.

    Tap in

    DB: So, according to this report, Mo Salah’s 100th goal in the Premier League was a tap in. Now, a tap in can be used as a noun – it was a tap in – or, as in this report, we can use it as a verb, to tap in a cross: Salah tapped in Alexander-Arnold’s cross. This means Salah had an easy job of just touching the ball, guiding the ball, towards the net. We might also say he turned it in, meaning he changed the direction of the ball so that it went in the goal. using the preposition ‘in‘ in both phrases indicates a goal. To turn it in or tap it in means the ball goes ‘in‘ the goal.

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    Bundle home

    DB: OK, so that was the first goal. The second goal of three was scored by Fabinho and is described this way – Fabinho bundling home the second – The player bundled home the ball, pass, or cross. To bundle home means to score from close range by pushing, knocking, poking, kicking the ball into the net. The nuance is that the goal is not very skillful but a bit chaotic.

    Now, I have to disagree with the BBC’s description of Fabinho’s goal. He took a touch – ie, controlled the ball – before smashing the ball home.

    • 4 min
    Learning English Through Football Podcast: 2022 World Cup Qualifier Portugal v Ireland

    Learning English Through Football Podcast: 2022 World Cup Qualifier Portugal v Ireland

    In this football language podcast we look at some of the words and phrases from the Guardian newspaper report on the 2022 World Cup qualifying match between Portugal and Ireland. You can read a transcript for this podcast below, while you can also check out our glossary of footballing phrases here and visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions or questions then you can contact us at admin@languagecaster.com.

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    Learning English Through Football Podcast: 2022 World Cup Qualifier Portugal v Ireland

    DF: Hello everyone, this is Damian from the Languagecaster.com team – I hope you are all doing well. Currently the 2022 World Cup qualifiers are taking place and so on this podcast we look at some of the words and phrases from the Guardian report on the Portugal versus Ireland match that took place earlier in the week. We look at some of the words from the headline and the main report, including ‘struck late on to win the game‘.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in Irish).

    Break Ireland’s hearts

    This was the headline from the Guardian newspaper report on the game between Portugal and Ireland in which Cristiano Ronaldo scored two last-gasp goals to win the game 2-1. Ronaldo’s two goals (a brace) meant that he now has scored the most goals in international football (111) which is why he is described as ‘record-breaker‘ in this headline. Now, to break someone’s heart is to cause someone to feel great sadness and that is exactly how I felt after the game when Portugal snatched victory at the death. In this headline we can also see that the phrase ‘break Ireland’s hearts‘ is used in the present form as it is describing something that has just happened and that it also offers a sense of drama.

    Have a penalty saved

    So, this sentence appears at the start of the report and includes much of the main information of the game – Ronaldo missed a penalty when the young Irish keeper Bazunu saved the spot kick and then it goes on to describe the opening goal for the Irish side. Interestingly, the verb form used here is ‘for what would have been‘ which means that it did not happen – there was no famous or deserved victory. Ireland very rarely win away against any of the top international sides which is why it was descri...

    • 4 min
    Learning English Through Football Podcast: Reach an Agreement

    Learning English Through Football Podcast: Reach an Agreement

    In this short football language podcast we look at the phrase ‘to reach an agreement‘ after Ronaldo’s return to Old Trafford. You can read a transcript for this podcast below, while you can also check out our glossary of footballing phrases here and visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions or questions then you can contact us at admin@languagecaster.com.

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    Learning English Through Football Podcast: Reach an Agreement

    DF: Hello everyone, this is Damian from the Languagecaster.com team – I hope you are all doing well and enjoying the start to the new season wherever you are. Now, in this short podcast we are going to look at the expression ‘to reach an agreement‘ which has been used in recent news reports about many players moving clubs in the transfer window and in particular about Portuguese superstar Cristiano Ronaldo’s return to Manchester United. We use a BBC report on his move from Juventus to show how this phrase ‘to reach an agreement‘ is used.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in Italian).

    To reach an agreement

    DF: OK, agreement is the noun form of the verb to agree which of course means to have a similar opinion about something with someone. So, I agree with your idea that VAR needs to change, for example. An agreement between two different parties, groups or in this case football clubs when talking about transfers means that the clubs have decided that a player can move between these two sides. This agreement suggests that the two clubs will allow the transfer to go ahead though it is not yet at the final confirmed contract stage – this will come later. The verb ‘to reach‘ is often used with this noun, so, to reach an agreement and means that the two clubs are both happy with the transfer fee. In addition to ‘reach an agreement‘ we might also hear the following phrases:



    * To be in agreement;

    * To have an agreement;

    * To obtain an agreement;

    * To come to an agreement



    Let’s have a look at some of the ways this phrase has been used in the BBC report.



    * Manchester United have confirmed they have reached an agreement to re-sign Cristiano Ronaldo from Juventus.

    * United have agreed to pay £12.8m for the 36-year-old five-time Ballon d’Or winner, with the deal subject to personal terms

    * Neighbours Manchester City had looked to be one of the favourites to land the former Real Madrid player and some reports suggested personal terms had already been agreed between the two.



    So, in the first example the writer explains the main points of the story – the transfer of Ronaldo will go ahead between the two clubs &#8...

    • 3 min
    Pickpocketing – Football Language: 2021-22 Season: Southampton vs Manchester United

    Pickpocketing – Football Language: 2021-22 Season: Southampton vs Manchester United

    This football language podcast looks back at one of the matches from the second week of games in the Premier League 2021-22 season. We focus on the own goal scored by Fred, which gave Southampton the lead. You can read a transcript for this podcast below, while you can also check out our glossary of footballing phrases here and visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions or questions then you can contact us at admin@languagecaster.com. (DB=Damon)

    Pickpocketing – Football Language: 2021-22 Season: Southampton vs Manchester United

    DB: You’re listening to languagecaster.com’s football language 2021-2022 season podcast. Hello there everyone, my name’s Damon, one half of the Languagecaster team and today I’ll be talking about some football language from the Southampton versus Manchester United match last Sunday. Now, the game ended in a 1-1 draw, which gave the south coast side their first point of the campaign, while Manchester United will be a  bit disappointed after their opening 5-1 thrashing of Leeds the week  before.

    I want to concentrate on the opening goal which was an own goal, and some of the football language used to describe it. First of all, here is how it was reported in The Guardian newspaper:

    The moment that led to Saints taking the lead stemmed from Jack Stephens pickpocketing a dawdling Fernandes 25 yards from goal. Stephens looked up and played a slide-rule pass infield, which was worked into Adams’ feet via neat touches by Moussa Djenepo and Armstrong.

    Pickpocketing

    DB: Let’s start with the Jack Stephens ‘pickpocketing‘ a dawdling Fernandes. The verb, to pick someone’s pocket means to steal something, usually a wallet or money from their coat or trouser pocket. In football, the player steals the ball of course. The start of the move is described as one player pickpocketing another, so Stephens tackled and dispossessed Fernandes. We could also say that Stephens picked Fernandes’s pocket to mean the same thing.

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    Dawdling

    The Manchester United player is described as ‘dawdling‘, which means moving slowly with no purpose, wasting time. Fernandes believed he had more time than he had. He lacked urgency, which means he wasn’t thinking quickly and looking to pass or move with the ball. This hesitation allowed his pocket to be picked and the ball to be taken off him.

    Slide Rule Pass

    We then read that Stephens played a ‘slide rule pass‘ infield. A slide ruler is an instrument used in mathematics to make accurate calculations. In football it means an extremely accurate pass – the ball goes exactly where the passer wanted it to go. It often has a nuance of passing through a very small gap, so maybe between two opposing players. So, Stephens plays a great pass infield, into the middle of the pitch.

    Neat touch

    The ball is then passed by two other Southampton players and these passes are described as ‘n...

    • 4 min
    Learn English Through Football Podcast: The Bench

    Learn English Through Football Podcast: The Bench

    In this football language podcast we look at some of the football expressions with the word ‘bench‘, including ‘on the bench‘, ‘come off the bench‘, ‘strong bench‘ and ‘to bench‘. You can read a transcript for this podcast below, while you can also check out our glossary of footballing phrases here and visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions or questions then you can contact us at admin@languagecaster.com.

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    Learn English Through Football Podcast: The Bench

    DF: Hello everyone, this is Damian from the Languagecaster.com team – I hope you are all doing well. Now, in this short podcast we are going to look at some of the expressions connected to the word ‘bench‘ that are used in football and we’d like to say thanks to Maria for this as she asked about the expression ‘make the bench‘ which gave us the idea for this podcast.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in Dutch).

    Make the bench

    DF: OK, let’s start with that phrase ‘make the bench‘ and this refers to when a player is named as a substitute and is on the bench for the game. If a player has ‘only made the bench‘ it suggests that they may have been dropped although if a player is returning from injury and they make the bench then this meaning is a little more positive. So, in this week’s Premier League opener, Tottenham player Harry Kane didn’t make the bench as his manager didn’t think he was fit enough to play.

    On the bench/Come off the bench

    So, if a player is on the bench it means that they are not in the starting xi – they are in the match day squad but not starting. If a player then replaces another team mate we can say they have come off the bench.

    To Bench

    To bench a player means that they have been dropped or demoted from the first team and instead will sit on the bench. Sometimes this could be because the player has not been playing well or that the manager wishes to discipline the player – a manager might bench a player who has not followed team instructions for example.

    Strong bench

    If a team has a strong bench it means that they can call on some good players during the game if they need to – their bench has players who are of a high level. Many of the top clubs in football have strong or deep squads which means that they can have a strong bench – they have good players in their match day squads waiting to come off the bench and play.

    Vocabulary



    * Come off the bench

    * a href="https://languagecaster.

    • 3 min

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A free weekly podcast for learners of English about football.

What a cool idea! Informative, smart and funny, Damon and Damian keep EFL/ESL students up to date with all that is going on in the soccer world. Regular sections on the show include a weekly review of the football stories, English phrases used in football and predictions. There are worksheets, transcripts, polls and vocabulary lists on their website too.

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