6 episodes

The Science Podcast From Live Science
The world can be a pretty mysterious place and we at Live Science love to ask and answer questions about mysteries big and small: about ancient civilizations, our planet and our solar system, the plants and animals that live alongside us, our bodies and how they work, and the technologies that we use every day.
Join us on this exciting voyage of discovery and downright weirdness as we solve… Life’s Little Mysteries.

Life's Little Mysteries audioBoom

    • Science

The Science Podcast From Live Science
The world can be a pretty mysterious place and we at Live Science love to ask and answer questions about mysteries big and small: about ancient civilizations, our planet and our solar system, the plants and animals that live alongside us, our bodies and how they work, and the technologies that we use every day.
Join us on this exciting voyage of discovery and downright weirdness as we solve… Life’s Little Mysteries.

    6: Mysteries of Eating and Drinking

    6: Mysteries of Eating and Drinking

    Is it safe to drink blood? (https://www.livescience.com/15899-drinking-blood-safe.html) What would happen if you ate an entire Trinidad Moruga Scorpion Chili Pepper (https://www.livescience.com/34187-trinidad-moruga-scorpion-chili-pepper.html) ? And why do delicious french fries taste so bad when they’re cold? All these food and drink related questions (and a whole lot more) are answered by our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy.
     
    Below you can find links to further reading on the topics discussed in this episode.
     
    Mystery #1: Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They're Cold? (https://www.livescience.com/56355-cold-french-fries-taste.html)  
    Interview with Denise Tieman of the Plant Innovation Center at University of Florida in Gainesville, discusses her research aimed at creating a more flavorful tomato. 
     
    Mystery #2: What If You Eat an Entire Trinidad Moruga Scorpion Chili Pepper? (https://www.livescience.com/34187-trinidad-moruga-scorpion-chili-pepper.html)
    Chili peppers have their very own rating scale: the Scoville scale, which indicates amount of capsaicin is present..and how hot they are! 
    A Ghost pepper is among hottest and has 1 million Scoville units!
    Guest editor report with Live Science senior writer, Rachel Rettner: How a Piece of Popcorn Stuck in a Man's Teeth Led to Open-Heart Surgery (https://www.livescience.com/popcorn-teeth-heart-infection.html)
     
    Mystery #3: Is It Safe to Drink Blood? (https://www.livescience.com/15899-drinking-blood-safe.html)
    Blood drinking or eating congealed blood, usually combined with meat, is common in cultures around the world 
    Drinking cattle blood is part of the traditional Maasai diet in Kenya and Tanzania
     
    Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) .
     
    Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms
    Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)

    • 51 min
    5: Mysterious Volcanoes

    5: Mysterious Volcanoes

    How do scientists know when a volcano is about to erupt? What would happen if Yellowstone’s supervolcano erupted? And what would happen if every volcano on earth erupted at once? All these questions (and a whole lot more)are answered by our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy.
     
    Below you can find links to further reading on the topics discussed in this episode.
     
    Mystery #1: How Do Scientists Know a Volcano Is About to Erupt? (https://www.livescience.com/8809-scientists-volcano-erupt.html)
    Warning signs can begin weeks or months before an eruption
    Some of the many signs a volcanologist will look for include seismographic detection of earthquakes and tremors and analyzing cracking patterns in the ground in close proximity to the volcano 
    Guest editor report with space.com reporter Chelsea Gohd: An asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs. Then, a volcano helped life flourish. (https://www.livescience.com/asteroid-killed-dinosaurs-volcanic-eruption-life.html)
     
    Mystery #2: What Would Happen If Yellowstone's Supervolcano Erupted? (https://www.livescience.com/20714-yellowstone-supervolcano-eruption.html)
    Yellowstone National Park is made up of three overlapping calderas 
    Calderas are bowl-shaped craters that were formed after three giant eruptions occured 2.1 million, 1.3 million and 640,000 years ago. 
    Interview with volcanologist Dr. Jessica Ball, you can find out more about her work on her blog, Magma Cum Laude (https://blogs.agu.org/magmacumlaude/) , and by following her on Twitter (https://twitter.com/tuff_cookie) , 
    Mystery #3: What If Every Volcano on Earth Erupted at Once? (https://www.livescience.com/49305-what-if-all-volcanoes-erupted.html)
    Worldwide 1,500 potentially active volcanoes, around 500 of which have erupted during recorded human history.  
    That number excluded the amount of volcanoes on the seafloor. 
     
    Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) .
     
    Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms
    Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)

    • 52 min
    4: Mysterious Dogs

    4: Mysterious Dogs

    How did dogs get to be dogs? What do our four legged friends dream about? And - most importantly - are dogs really smiling at us when we think they are? All these questions (and a whole lot more)are answered by our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy.
     
    Below you can find links to further reading on the topics discussed in this episode.
     
     
    Mystery #1: How Did Dogs Get to Be Dogs? (https://www.livescience.com/8405-dogs-dogs.html)
    Dogs diverged from wolves — Canis lupus — at least 20,000 and perhaps as long as 40,000 years ago
    A 14,700-year-old jawbone is the oldest undisputed fossil from a domesticated dog (Canis lupus familiaris)
      Mystery #2: What Do Dogs Dream About? (https://www.livescience.com/53743-dog-dreams.html)  
    In 1977, scientists studied 6 pointer dogs, studied electrical brain activity for 24 hours: They spent 44% of time awake; 21% drowsy; 12% in REM sleep; and 23% in the deepest stage of non-REM sleep (slow-wave sleep).
     For whatever reason, the size of the dog may determine the size of the dream. Smaller dogs have more frequent but shorter dream periods; large dogs have less frequent but longer dreams.
     Guest editor report with Rafi Letzer: Tibetan Mastiffs Bred with Mountain Wolves to Survive at Super-High Altitudes (https://www.livescience.com/tibetan-mastiff-wolf-genes.html)
     
     
    Mystery #3:  Are Dogs Really Smiling at Us? (https://www.livescience.com/65506-are-dogs-smiling.html)
    We have a special bond with our dogs and when  humans and dogs stare into each other's eyes, both experience a rise in levels of oxytocin
    Very few other animals in the world actually make eye contact with humans 
     
     Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) .
     
    Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms
    Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)

    • 44 min
    3: Mysterious Cats

    3: Mysterious Cats

    Why do cats like boxes? Why do they wiggle their butts before they pounce and does cat nip really make cats high? All these questions (and a whole lot more) are answered by our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy.
     
    Below you can find links to further reading on the topics discussed in this episode.
     
    Mystery #1: Why Do Cats Like Boxes? (https://www.livescience.com/45461-why-do-cats-like-boxes.html)
    A 2014 study in the journal Applied Animal Behavior Science (https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0168159114002366) with shelter cats with and without hiding boxes to see if boxes could reduce stress
    When cats are just lying around not expending energy, their ideal temperature is 86 to 100 degrees F (30 to 38 degrees C), according to a study published in 2016 in the Scientific World Journal (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5059607/)
    Mystery #2: Why Do Cats Wiggle Their Butts Before They Pounce? (https://www.livescience.com/64950-why-cats-wiggle-butts-before-pouncing.html)
     
    Guest editor report with Laura Gegel: Inside Ancient Egyptian Cat Mummy, Archaeologists Find the Remains of 3 Cats (https://www.livescience.com/ancient-cat-mummy-multiple-cats.html)
     
     
    Mystery #3: Does Catnip Really Make Cats 'High'? (https://www.livescience.com/does-catnip-get-cats-high.html)
    Its scientific name is Nepeta cataria. And it belongs to the mint family Lamiaceae
    Most cats — or maybe even all — are affected by catnip to some degree
     
    Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) .
    Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms
    Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)

    • 37 min
    2: Mysterious Oceans

    2: Mysterious Oceans

    Why is the sea salty? Could Earth’s oceans ever boil away? And just how much whale pee is in the ocean? All these questions (and a whole lot more) are answered by our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy.
    Below you can find links to further reading on the topics discussed in this episode.
    Mystery #1: Why is the Ocean salty? (https://www.livescience.com/32139-why-are-oceans-salty.html)
    Oceans on the young Earth were probably only slightly salty (https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/riversnotsalty.html) , but over time the mineral deposits became more concentrated, causing varying degrees of saltiness. 
    Osmoconformers (https://ci.coastal.edu/~sgilman/778AnimalAdapt.htm) - animal's "environment" on the inside matches its environment on the outside. Osmoregulators (https://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/water-h2o-life/life-in-water/surviving-in-salt-water) - have body structures that filter or secrete excess salt. 
    Mystery #2: Could Earth’s oceans ever boil away? (https://www.livescience.com/64822-could-oceans-boil-away.html)
    It’s an almost unimaginable amount of water: The US Geological Survey estimated more than 300 million cubic miles of it (https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/wherewater.html) .
    Guest editor report: Underwater Volcano Creates Bubbles More Than a Quarter-Mile Across (https://www.livescience.com/giant-bubbles-underwater-volcano.html) .
    Mystery #3: How much of the ocean is whale pee… and worse! (https://www.livescience.com/55189-how-much-of-ocean-is-whale-pee.html)
    A study published in 2003 found some numbers: the sei whale expels 166 gallons (627 litres) of urine a day. 
    The fin whale expels 257 gallons (974 litres) a day (https://oceana.org/blog/special-ingredient-ocean-health-animal-pee-and-lots-it) !
    Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) .
    Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms
    Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)

    • 48 min
    1: Introducing... Life's Little Mysteries

    1: Introducing... Life's Little Mysteries

    Join Mindy Weisberger and Jeanna Bryner as they guide you on an exciting voyage of discovery and downright weirdness in a quest to solve… Life’s Little Mysteries.
    Have you ever wondered why the sea is salty, why we hiccup, or even why cats wiggle their butts before they pounce? Then this is the science podcast for you.
    Subscribe now and don't forget to join in the conversation by asking your own questions about this mysterious world we live in on our forums at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) .
    Visit our main site at www.livescience.com (https://www.livescience.com/) and follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/LiveScience.
    Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms
    Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)

    • 2 min

Customer Reviews

Bondedouche ,

Great show!

Already learning and it’s only episode 1!

mrstench ,

The Life Aquatic

Found this via Google while looking for random whale facts... as you do. Great start for a science pod - interesting, charming and funny.

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