45 episodes

LSE IQ is a monthly podcast from the London School of Economics and Political Science in which we ask some of the smartest social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. #LSEIQ

LSE IQ podcast London School of Economics and Political Science

    • Education
    • 4.7 • 65 Ratings

LSE IQ is a monthly podcast from the London School of Economics and Political Science in which we ask some of the smartest social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. #LSEIQ

    Why do people believe in conspiracy theories?

    Why do people believe in conspiracy theories?

    Contributor(s): Dr Ela Drazkiewicz-Grodzicka, Professor Bradley Franks, Dr Erica Lagalisse | Conspiracy theories fomented by political division and a global pandemic have gained traction in the public consciousness in the last couple of years. For some people these ideas are just fun and entertaining, but for others their interest in them becomes much more consuming. Why do people become involved in this kind of conspiratorial thinking? That’s the question that LSE iQ tackles in this month’s episode.
    Concerns that 5G phone masts reduce our bodies’ defences against COVID-19 and that vaccines are being used to inject us with micro-chips - allowing us to be tracked and controlled - may seem extraordinary to many of us. But these beliefs have led to the vandalism of 5G phone masts and made some reluctant to be vaccinated.
    In this episode of LSE iQ, Sue Windebank finds out how left-wing anarchists got caught up in conspiratorial thinking and how Irish parents looking for support and community were accused of spreading a conspiracy. And is LSE unknowingly carrying out the wishes of the Illuminati? Listen to hear how LSE became embroiled in a global conspiracy.
    Sue talks to: Dr Ela Drążkiewicz from the Institute for Sociology at the Slovak Academy of Sciences; Professor Bradley Franks from LSE’s Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science; and Dr Erica Lagalisse from LSE’s Institute of Inequalities.
     
    Contributors
    Dr Ela Drazkiewicz-Grodzicka
    Professor Bradley Franks
    Dr Erica Lagalisse
     
    Research
    Taking vaccine regret and hesitancy seriously. The role of truth, conspiracy theories, gender relations and trust in the HPV immunisation programmes in Ireland (2021) by Elżbieta Drążkiewicz Grodzicka in Journal for Cultural Research
    Beyond “Monologicality”? Exploring Conspiracist Worldviews (2017) by Bradley Franks, Adrian Bangerter, Martin W. Bauer, Matthew Hall and Mark C. Noort in Frontiers in Psychology
    Occult Features of Anarchism: With Attention to the Conspiracy of Kings and the Conspiracy of the Peoples (2019) by Erica Lagalisse

    • 44 min
    What does it really mean to be a citizen?

    What does it really mean to be a citizen?

    Contributor(s): Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey, Dr Ian Sanjay Patel, Dr Megan Ryburn | Citizenship. What does that word really signify? This episode of LSE IQ takes a look at the issue in all its complexities, uncovering how decisions made by a 19th century West African Gola ruler connect to today’s Liberian land ownership laws; why British citizenship became racialised in the decades following the second world war – legislation that led to the Windrush Scandal, devastating the lives of hundreds of black Britons; and how Bolivian migrants in the present day have struggled to create new lives in Chile.
    To understand more about the many ways citizenship can impact our lives, Jess Winterstein spoke to Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey, Dr Ian Sanjay Patel and Dr Megan Ryburn
    Speakers: Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey, Dr Ian Sanjay Patel and Dr Megan Ryburn
    Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey, Department of Social Policy, LSE
    https://www.lse.ac.uk/social-policy/people/academic-staff/dr-robtel-neajai-pailey
    Dr Ian Sanjay Patel, Department of Sociology, LSE
    https://www.lse.ac.uk/sociology/people/ian-patel
    Dr Megan Ryburn, Latin America and Caribbean Centre (LACC), LSE
    https://www.lse.ac.uk/lacc/people/megan-ryburn
    Research Development, (Dual) Citizenship and its Discontents in Africa: The political economy of belonging to Liberia by Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey (Cambridge University Press). To read the Introduction free of charge see https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/development-dual-citizenship-and-its-discontents-in-africa/B96CB2D100CFEC03EE476D103F46348B# The ebook is also available in the LSE library.
    We’re Here Because You Were There: Immigration and the end of empire by Dr Ian Sanjay Patel (Verso) https://www.versobooks.com/books/3700-we-re-here-because-you-were-there
    Uncertain Citizenship: everyday practices of Bolivian migrants in Chile by Dr Megan Ryburn (University of California Press). https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520298774/uncertain-citizenship
     

    • 44 min
    Do algorithms have too much power?

    Do algorithms have too much power?

    Contributor(s): Ken Benoit, Andrew Murray, Seeta Peña Gangaradhan, Alison Powell, Bernhard Von Stengel | Computer algorithms shape our lives and increasingly control our future. They have crept into virtually every aspect of modern life and are making life-changing choices on our behalf, often without us realising. But how much power should we give to them and have we let things go too far? Joanna Bale talks to Ken Benoit, Andrew Murray, Seeta Peña Gangaradhan, Alison Powell and Bernhard Von Stengel.
    Research links: Hello World by Hannah Fry;
    Information Technology Law: The Law and Society by Andrew Murray;
    Explanations as Governance? Investigating practices of explanation in algorithmic system design by Alison Powell (forthcoming).

    • 44 min
    Scroungers versus Strivers: the myth of the welfare state

    Scroungers versus Strivers: the myth of the welfare state

    Contributor(s): Professor John Hills | This episode is dedicated to social policy giant Professor Sir John Hills, who died in December 2020.
    In this episode, John tackles the myth that the welfare state supports a feckless underclass who cost society huge amounts of money. Instead, he sets out a system where most of what we pay in, comes back to us. He describes a generational contract which we all benefit from, varying on our stage of life.
    His words remain timely after a year of pandemic which has devastated many people’s livelihoods. Many of us have had to rely on state support in ways that we could not have anticipated, perhaps challenging our ideas about what type of person receives benefits in the UK.
    This episode is based on an interview that John did with James Rattee for the LSE iQ podcast in 2017. It coincided with the LSE Festival which celebrated the anniversary of the publication of the ‘Beveridge Report’ in 1942 - a blueprint for a British universal care system by former LSE Director William Beveridge.
    Professor Sir John Hills CBE, was Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at LSE and Chair of CASE. His influential work didn’t just critique government policy on poverty and inequality, it changed it. He advised on a wide range of issues including pensions reform, fuel poverty, council housing, income and wealth distribution.
     
    Contributors
    Professor John Hills
     
    Research
    Good Times Bad Times: the welfare myth of them and us. Bristol: Policy Press by John Hills (2015)

    • 19 min
    Should we be optimistic?

    Should we be optimistic?

    Contributor(s): Dr Tali Sharot, Dr Joan Costa-Font, Professor David de Meza, Dr Chris Kutarna |  
    Despite our growing collective pessimism about the state of the world, when it comes to our own lives, research suggests we are generally optimistic.
     
    After a year that will remain synonymous with anxiety, isolation, endless devastating news reports, and for too many – loss, this episode of LSE IQ asks: is optimism is good for us? And, beyond the effects on our wellbeing, is optimism an accurate lens through which to view the world?
     
    Addressing these issues are: Dr Tali Sharot, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at UCL; Dr Joan Costa-Font, Associate Professor in Health Economics at LSE; Dr David de Meza, Professor of Management at LSE; and Dr Chris Kutarna, author of Age of Discovery: Navigating the Risks and Rewards of our New Renaissance.
     
     
    Contributors
     
    Dr Tali Sharot
    Dr Joan Costa-Font
    Professor David de Meza
    Dr Chris Kutarna
    Research
     
    The Optimism Bias: Why we're wired to look on the bright side by Tali Sharot.
    Neither an Optimist Nor a Pessimist Be: Mistaken Expectations Lower Well-Being by David de Meza and Chris Dawson in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.
    Why optimism and entrepreneurship are not always a good mix for business by David de Meza and Chris Dawson in The Conversation.
    Optimism and the perceptions of new risks by Elias Mossialos, Caroline Rudisdill and Joan Costa-Font
    in the Journal of Risk Research.
    Explaining optimistic old age disability and longevity expectations by Joan Costa-Font and Montserrat Costa-Font in Social Indicators Research.
    Does optimism help us during a pandemic? by Joan Costa-Font.
    Age of Discovery: Navigating the Risks and Rewards of Our New Renaissance by Chris Kutarna and Ian Goldin.
     

    • 39 min
    What’s the point of social science in a pandemic?

    What’s the point of social science in a pandemic?

    Contributor(s): Professor Laura Bear, Nikita Simpson, Professor Joan Roses, Dr Adam Oliver, Dr Clare Wenham, Professor Patrick Wallis | In this month’s episode of the LSE IQ podcast we ask, ‘What’s the point of social science in a pandemic?’.
     
    On the 23rd March 2020 Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced the country’s first national lockdown. In the months since, there has been a seismic shift in all our lives. As we embark on 2021 and, hopefully, the latter stages of the pandemic, now is an apt moment to reflect on how we’ve got to where we are. While the scientific community has taken centre stage in the fight to overcome the virus, how have social scientists helped us navigate – and evaluate –the UK’s response?
     
    In this episode we talk to anthropologists Professor Laura Bear and Nikita Simpson, Economic historians Professor Patrick Wallis and Professor Joan Roses, Assistant Professor of Global Health Policy Dr Clare Wenham and behavioural economist Dr Adam Oliver.
     
    Research
     
    ’A good death’ during the Covid-19 pandemic in the UK: a report on key findings and recommendations, by the COVID and Care Research Group
     A Right to Care: The Social Foundations of Recovery from COVID-19, by the COVID and Care Research Group
     The Redistributive Effects of Pandemics: Evidence of the Spanish Flu. By Sergi Basco, Jordi Domenech, and Johanne Rohses
     Separating behavioural science from the herd by Adam Oliver
    Reciprocity and the art of behavioural public policy by Adam Oliver
    What is the future of UK leadership in global health security post Covid-19? By Clare Wenham
    A Dreadful Heritage: Interpreting Epidemic Disease at Eyam, 1666-2000, by Patrick Wallis
    Eyam revisited: lessons from a plague village, by Patrick Wallis
     
    Contributors
     
    Professor Laura Bear
    Nikita Simpson
    Professor Joan Roses
    Dr Adam Oliver
    Dr Clare Wenham
    Professor Patrick Wallis
     

    • 44 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
65 Ratings

65 Ratings

AlexJC18 ,

Informative

Very accessible and thought provoking. Suitable for everyone, regardless of your knowledge and passion for economics.

Jayzaks ,

Excellent

Essential listening for anyone interested in expert analysis of current issues.

Older Listener 63 ,

Great stuff

Wonderful listening and reflecting !!!

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