57 episodes

From global think tank ODI, in Think Change we discuss some of the world’s most pressing global issues with a variety of experts and commentators. Find out more at odi.org

ODI | Think Change ODI

    • News
    • 4.8 • 11 Ratings

From global think tank ODI, in Think Change we discuss some of the world’s most pressing global issues with a variety of experts and commentators. Find out more at odi.org

    What will it take to end femicide?

    What will it take to end femicide?

    Femicide – the intentional killing of women and girls with a gender-related motivation – affects every society around the world. According to UN Women, nearly 89,000 women and girls were killed intentionally in 2022 – the highest number recorded in the past 20 years. And over half of all female homicides were committed by family members or intimate partners. This episode puts a spotlight on this global atrocity. Experts from Italy, Kenya and Mexico share insights on how femicide is impacting their countries. We examine its root causes, how women’s movements are countering it, and what further action is urgently needed to bring about truly lasting change. While comprehensive legislation is a critical starting point, we hear why challenging gender norms which make misogyny so deeply entrenched in society is fundamental if we are to curb femicide and see transformational change. Speakers Sara Pantuliano (host), Chief Executive, ODIDinah Musindarwezo, Co-CEO, Womankind WorldwideDiana Jiménez Thomas Rodriguez, Senior Research Officer, ODINicoletta Mandolini, Researcher, CECS, Universidade do Minho, Portugal Related resources Gender-related killings of women and girls (femicide/feminicide): Global estimates of female intimate partner/family-related homicides in 2022 (UN Women report)10 ways to transform gender norms (ALIGN booklet)Transforming gender norms for women’s economic rights and empowerment (ALIGN report)Is no space safe? Working to end gender-based violence in the public sphere (ALIGN briefing paper)Mobilising for change: how women’s social movements are transforming gender norms (ALIGN report)Think Change podcast: how can we counter the anti-feminist backlash? (ODI)From allyship to action: how men can step up to end violence against women (ODI event video/podcast)ODI in conversation with Emma Dabiri: can coalitions counter the anti-feminist backlash? (ODI event video/podcast)Women's organisations and feminist mobilisation: supporting the foundational drivers of gender equality (ODI briefing paper)

    • 35 min
    Will the ICJ ruling change anything for Gaza?

    Will the ICJ ruling change anything for Gaza?

    In November, South Africa approached the International Court of Justice (ICJ) to call for an immediate ceasefire in Gaza and to consider whether Israel is committing genocide. All eyes were on the Hague last month as the ICJ made its interim ruling, calling for Israel to "take all measures within its powers" to prevent civilian deaths in Gaza. But it stopped short of ordering a ceasefire. The court also ruled that aid must be allowed into Gaza. But since then, allegations from Israel that some employees of UNRWA – Gaza's biggest aid agency – were involved in the 7 October Hamas attacks has resulted in 16 donor countries suspending UNRWA funding. In this episode, legal, humanitarian and foreign policy experts take stock of these events and dissect what the ICJ ruling really means for Israel, Gaza and wider geopolitical relations. SpeakersSara Pantuliano (host), Chief Executive, ODIKate Mackintosh, Executive Director, UCLA Law Promise Institute EuropeRaz Segal, Associate Professor of Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Stockton UniversityRonak Gopaldas, Director, Signal RiskSorcha O’Callaghan, Director of Programme, Humanitarian Policy Group Related resourcesSouth Africa’s ICJ case has already altered its foreign policy space (Institute for Security Studies)Humanitarian hypocrisy, double standards and the law in Gaza (ODI insight)Gaza | The politics of narrative (ODI event)Israel/OPT crisis - what's needed to stop the bloodshed? (ODI podcast)Palestine and Israel - How can justice prevail? (ODI podcast)

    • 34 min
    How can AI become a force for social good?

    How can AI become a force for social good?

    Artificial intelligence (AI) dominated conversations at the recent World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos. The release of ChatGPT to the public in December 2022 put AI firmly in the spotlight. And today it is all around us, promising to transform how we live our lives. But there are plenty of concerns and warnings about how it could impact the world. Many have sounded the alarm, even the so-called “Godfather of AI” Geoffrey Hinton, who has been vocal about the dangers of the technology he helped to create. In this episode, experts reflect on the ethical implications of these technological advances. We ask how AI can become a force for social good which empowers people globally rather than entrenching inequalities. And with over half the world due to go to the polls in 2024, what impact will AI have on politics in this major election year and beyond? SpeakersSara Pantuliano (host), Chief Executive, ODIVilas Dhar, President, Patrick J. McGovern Foundation, and advocate of data and AI for goodGabriela Ramos, Assistant Director-General, Social and Human Sciences, UNESCOStephanie Diepeveen, Senior Research Fellow, ODI ResourcesHas AI ushered in an existential crisis of trust in democracy? (ODI insight)International AI Governance must be truly global (ODI insight)

    • 33 min
    What trends will shape 2024? Part 2

    What trends will shape 2024? Part 2

    Last year was a bumpy one for the global economy, with sluggish growth, high inflation, tightened monetary policy and instability in the financial sector. This all played out against a backdrop of increased geopolitical tensions and fiscal pressures. This second podcast in our two-part mini-series on 2024 trends examines the global economic outlook for the year ahead. Will the next 12 months be defined by more uncertainty, or are there reasons to be optimistic about changes ahead? Experts discuss the big economic trends and developments to watch out for in 2024, including the outlook for global trade, prospects for India’s economy and green investment, and what needs to happen to tackle persistent income inequality within and between countries. SpeakersSara Pantuliano (host), Chief Executive, ODIArancha González Laya, Dean of the Paris School of International AffairsRathin Roy, Visiting Senior Fellow, ODIMichael Jacobs, Professor of Political Economy, University of Sheffield & ODI Visiting Senior Fellow Related resourcesThink Change episode 37: what trends will shape 2024? Part 1

    • 37 min
    What trends will shape 2024? Part 1

    What trends will shape 2024? Part 1

    2023 has been another year marked by major crises. This final episode reflects on where we are now, and the major global themes shaping 2024. The world is at a pivotal moment as we try to cope with multiple, interconnected crises. The number of people fleeing war, persecution and violence is at an estimated 114 million, against a backdrop of rising geo-political tensions, carbon emissions, food and energy crises, and economic instability. All this comes at a time when systems are overwhelmed, and international cooperation remains fragmented. But are there reasons for optimism? Next year will be the biggest election year in history with more than half the world due to exercise their right to vote, putting the spotlight on the state of global democracy. In this episode our guests share their unique perspective on the major themes and forces shaping 2024. SpeakersSara Pantuliano (host), Chief Executive, ODIIan Bremmer, President and Founder, Eurasia GroupAlexis Akwagyiram, Managing Editor, Semafor AfricaKathryn Nwajiaku-Dahou, Director of Programme, Politics and Governance, ODI

    • 34 min
    Why is modern slavery on the rise?

    Why is modern slavery on the rise?

    An increase in modern slavery in the last five years has been met with a decrease in the political will needed to address it. But what can consumers do to make more ethical choices this holiday season and beyond? In this episode we navigate the intricate web of human trafficking, exploitation and forced labour within global supply chains. We put the spotlight on the retail industry, exposing its role in the disproportionate vulnerability of women and children to forced labour. Our guests delve into the evolving response of the world to human trafficking challenges, exploring the complexities tied to migration and government policies. As the discussion unfolds, the conversation draws crucial links to the theme of sustainability and provides practical advice for consumers.~ Join Sara Pantuliano and guests in this exploration of ethical consumerism, human rights and the collective responsibility to create a sustainable world. SpeakersSara Pantuliano (host), Chief Executive, ODINasreen Sheikh, Survivor, Author and Social EntrepreneurGrace Forrest, Founding Director, Walk FreeEkaette Ikpe, Director, African Leadership Centre, Kings College London, and ODI board member Related resources Walk FreeLocal Women's HandicraftsAfrica Fashion Futures: Creative economies, global networks and local developmentAfrican Fashion Futures podcastIntertwined: Fashion, Textile and Heritage in Nigeria exhibition at King's College London, 2022 and African Leadership Centre, NairobiIkpe E, England, L., and Comunian, R. (Forthcoming). Fashion designers as lead firms from below: creative economy, state capitalism and internationalisation in Lagos and Nairobi. Competition and Change.

    • 37 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
11 Ratings

11 Ratings

tom.al ,

Fascinating

Really interesting series, packed with interesting insights and interviews! Would particularly recommend for those interested in gender and development.

Gdoghussler ,

Amazing!

Super podcast series LOVE IT

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