76 episodes

Stories of Scotland is an award-winning Scottish history podcast. Join hosts Jenny and Annie as they unravel the rich tapestry of Scotland’s culture, nature and heritage. Prepared to climb into caves, cairns and chaos, Jenny and Annie travel around Scotland and investigate how stories of the past can help us make sense of modern life.

Stories of Scotland celebrates Scottish history through traditional storytelling, archival research, museum objects and wandering in nature. It is recorded in Inverness & hosted by Jenny, an environmental scientist & Annie, an archivist.

Stories of Scotland Carrying Stream

    • History
    • 4.8 • 131 Ratings

Stories of Scotland is an award-winning Scottish history podcast. Join hosts Jenny and Annie as they unravel the rich tapestry of Scotland’s culture, nature and heritage. Prepared to climb into caves, cairns and chaos, Jenny and Annie travel around Scotland and investigate how stories of the past can help us make sense of modern life.

Stories of Scotland celebrates Scottish history through traditional storytelling, archival research, museum objects and wandering in nature. It is recorded in Inverness & hosted by Jenny, an environmental scientist & Annie, an archivist.

    Fairy Folks of Loch Fyne

    Fairy Folks of Loch Fyne

    Annie and Jenny look at the beautiful environment of Loch Fyne, and explore the folklore that has developed around it. We have some lighthearted fairy stories and a spooky ghost tale around the areas of Inveraray Castle and Stonefield Castle. 
    This episode is sponsored by WeeBox - go to www.weebox.co.uk and enter the code ‘Story10’ for an exclusive discount!

    You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland
    This is part of the Radical Mountain Women, funded by the Royal Society of Literature. Some of the music you heard in this episode was beautifully played by Nicky Murray and Chloe Rodgers.

    Sources:
    Stoddart, J., Remarks on Local Scenery and Manners in Scotland during the Years 1799 and 1800. William Milar, 1801. 
    MacCormick, D.(contributor), Maclean C. I. (Fieldworker), SA1954.7.B1, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, University of Edinburgh (https://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/track/42064)
    Articles from the Occult Review (1909), the Scottish Mountaineering Journal (1890), The Globe (1895), Morning Post (1909), Falkirk Herald (1870), Fife Herald (1852).

    • 55 min
    The Hercules: A History of Scottish Diaspora

    The Hercules: A History of Scottish Diaspora

    Join Annie and Jenny on a trip around the world. The year is 1852, the Potato Famine and Highland Clearances are causing devastation, and hundreds of Scots board The Hercules, a ship destined for Adelaide, but struck by horrific disaster. As they leave their home in Scotland to start a new life halfway around the world, storms, disease, and sharks all plague the voyage. This episode looks at why these people left their homes, the journey they undertook, and their lives in Australia, if they survived to live them. 

    This episode is sponsored by WeeBox - go to www.weebox.co.uk and enter the code ‘Story10’ for an exclusive discount!

    Book tickets for the National Museum of Scotland exhibition Anatomy: A Matter of Death and Life here: www.nms.ac.uk/anatomy

    You can support Stories of Scotland on patreon, visit www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland to join up!

    References: 

    Devine, T. M, “The Scottish Clearances: A History of the Dispossessed, 1600-1900”, 2019, Penguin

    Devine, T.M, “Scotland’s Empire: The Origins of the Global Diaspora”, Penguin, 2004

    Hunter, James, “Scottish Exodus: Travels Among a Worldwide Clan”, Mainstream, 2005

    Richards, Eric, “Highland emigrants to South Australia in the 1850s”, Northern Scotland, Vol 5, Feb 2015

    Reportings from the Inverness Couier, Cork Examiner, Edinburgh Evening Courant. 

    You can read the ship registers here: www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/guides/highland-and-island-emigration-society-records

    • 1 hr 10 min
    Promo: Weight of Sand

    Promo: Weight of Sand

    We’re sharing the first episode of a new podcast series we’ve just released called Weight of Sand.

    This is an audio drama exploring the life and lore of Isobel Gowdie. Isobel was accused of witchcraft in 1662. She lived in Auldearn in the Highlands of Scotland and her witchcraft confessions were detailed and vivid. 30 years after her trial, a nearby village of the Culbin was destroyed in a storm and covered in sand dunes. The sand was so extensive the land was called ‘The Sahara of Scotland’.

    Folklore blamed Isobel for cursing this land as revenge. Weight of Sand explores Isobel, her life, and the environment she is said to have destroyed. 

    Listen to more Weight of Sand episodes at: 
    Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/weight-of-sand/id1632916019
    Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6RD2r2aQJTXngkFPcvFgcq
    Pocket Casts: https://pca.st/podcast/815949a0-df45-013a-d9e1-0acc26574db2
    Podcast Addict: https://podcastaddict.com/podcast/4024035
    CastBox: https://castbox.fm/channel/Weight-of-Sand-id4994068
    Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/weight-of-sand
    Amazon: https://music.amazon.co.uk/podcasts/7761809b-fe11-4ea2-9491-8c3c6659fd26/weight-of-sand
    Website: https://www.carryingstream.com/weightofsand/

    • 19 min
    Granite Blessings of the Woman's Stone: Clach Bhan

    Granite Blessings of the Woman's Stone: Clach Bhan

    Join Annie and Jenny deep in the Cairngorms, as they climb Ben Avon, but the summit isn’t the goal, instead, they take a detour to an astounding rock formation called Clach Bhan, or in English, the Women’s Stone. This rock formation overlooks the surrounding glens, and has been a place of pilgrimage for hundreds of years. Pregnant women from miles around would undertake an arduous trek to this point and ask the stone for a safe childbirth. But why this stone, three-quarters of the way up a mountain? What caused it to be here? Why are there numerous bowl-shaped holes, perfect for sitting? And most importantly, what drew women to this spot, in search of solace and safety?

    This episode is sponsored by WeeBox - go to www.weebox.co.uk and enter the code ‘Story10’ for an exclusive discount!

    You can support Stories of Scotland on patreon, visit www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland to join up!
    Some of the music you heard in this episode was beautifully played by Nicky Murray and Chloe Rodgers.
    References:
    Aberdeen Press and Journal. Old North Country Superstitions. 1877.
    Gordon J, Wignall R, Brazier N, Bruneau P, ‘Cairngorms, A landscape Fashioned by Geology’, Scottish National Heritage, 2006.
    Mason D. Transactions of the Gaelic Society of Inverness, volume xiv, 1887-1888. Inverness: Gaelic Society of Inverness; 1889.
    Northern Scot and Moray & Nairn Express. A Highland Village in the 18th Century. 1911.
    Sinclair J. Statistical Accounts of Scotland. Edinburgh: William Creech; 1794.
    Smith A. The history and antiquities of new and old Aberdeen. Aberdeen: A. Murray; 1882.

    • 36 min
    Myths of a Skye Mountain: Beinn na Caillich

    Myths of a Skye Mountain: Beinn na Caillich

    Annie and Jenny discover how Skye’s greatest mountains are the remains of an ancient volcano. We unravel rich Scottish folklore about Beinn na Caillich: the Mountain of the Old Woman. We discuss the lore of giant women who battled across the sea with giant boulders. 
    Learn about Saucy Mary, a lost Norwegian Princess and, a fake Norwegian Princess. If you love Skye, this episode is filled with magical mountain lore. 

    You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland

    This is part of the Radical Mountain Women, funded by the Royal Society of Literature.
    References:
    Anderson, J., 1873. Notes of some Entries in the Iceland Annals regarding the Death of the Princes Margaret. Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, 10. 
    Finlayson, J. (Contributor), Maclean C. I. (Fieldworker), 1955. Mar a fhuair Beinn Na Caillich aim, SA1955.169, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, University of Edinburgh. 
    Gordon, S., 1927. A Peak in Skye: Beinn na Cailliche. The Scotsman. 
    Hull, E., 1927. Legends and Traditions of the Cailleach Bheara or Old Woman (Hag) of Beare. Folklore, 38.
    Kallestrup, L. and Toivo, R., 2017. Contesting Orthodoxy in Medieval and Early Modern Europe. Cham: Springer International Publishing: Palgrave Macmillan.
    Macculloch, J. and Scott, W., 1824. The Highlands and western Isles of Scotland in letters to Sir Walter Scott. London.
    MacKay, J., 1905. How Beinn na Caillich got its name. Celtic Monthly, Glasgow, 13. 
    Mackenzie, D. A., 1905. A Highland Goddess. The Celtic Review, 7, no. 28. 
    Whyte, A., 2021. The Cailleach in Place-Names and Place-Lore. Journal of Scottish Name Studies, 14.

    • 39 min
    St Kilda: Life & Lore

    St Kilda: Life & Lore

    Jenny and Annie explore the far edge of the Outer Hebrides, St Kilda. We look at the wonders of climbing the stacks of St Kilda, and the seabirds that create a symphony.
    We see through the eyes of Evelyn Heathcote, as she spends the night in a sea cave with a group of Gaelic psalm-singing St Kildans. We examine the folklore and landscape of this unique and special place. 

    You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland

    This is part of the Radical Mountain Women, funded by the Royal Society of Literature. Some of the music you heard in this episode was beautifully played by Nicky Murray and Chloe Rodgers.
    A special thanks to the School of Scottish Studies Archives for letting us use these Gaelic Psalm recordings:
    Salm 68, Contributor: John MacLeod, Fieldworker: Thorkild Knudsen, SA1963.44.A2, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, University of Edinburgh. [https://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/track/74853]
    Salm 118, Contributor: James Smith, Fieldworker: Thorkild Knudsen, SA1964.103.B3, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, University of Edinburgh. [https://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/track/75665]

    References:
    CANMORE, ‘St Kilda, Hirta, The Amazon’s House’, https://canmore.org.uk/site/3960/st-kilda-hirta-gleann-mor-the-amazons-house
    C. Maclean, ‘Island on the Edge of the World - The Story of St Kilda’, Cannongate Publishing, 1977. 
    E. J. Clegg & J. F. Cross, ‘Aspects of neonatal death in St Kilda, 1830-1930,  Journal of Biosocial Science, 1994. 
    G. F. Geddes, ‘The Amazon's House, Hirta, St Kilda – A Conservation Statement’, unpublished report for the National Trust for Scotland, RCAHMS Mss 6341, 2011.
    E. Heathcote, ‘A night in an Ocean cave’, World Wide Magazine, Vol 5, 1900. 
    E. Heathcoat, ‘A summer Sojourn in St Kilda’,Good Words, Vol  42, 1901.
    N. Heathcote, ‘Climbing in St Kilda’, Scottish Mountaineering Club Journal, Vol 6, 1901.
    ‘More About St Kilda Underground Houses,’ The Scotsman, 1928.
    National Trust for Scotland on St Kilda, a World Heritage Site: www.nts.org.uk/visit/places/st-kilda
    National Records of Scotland, ‘Stories from St Kilda’ https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/research/learning/features/stories-from-st-kilda
    P. Stride, ‘St Kilda, the neonatal tetanus tragedy of the nineteenth century and some twenty-first century answers’, Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, 2008.

    • 56 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
131 Ratings

131 Ratings

cateatdog58 ,

Great show.

Another great episode. Lots of info and geology with an exploration of social history with lots of silly jokes

CloudStick ,

Beautiful stories, beautifully told

Fantastic podcast with great storytelling, smooth sound quality and excellent music. Binge worthy for anyone interested in Scottish history. This show made me want to become an archivist, they are so passionate about researching ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Clan_dymas ,

Lovely people telling stories

As a Scottish person living in England this podcast has helped my children connect with the Scottish part of their heritage. When we started listening my daughter couldn’t understand what was being said but she wouldn’t let me turn it off because she liked listening to the sound of Jenny and Annie’s voices. She has got her ear in now and asks to listen every day. I love it because it helps keep me connected with my past. You are doing a great job you lovely people!

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