99 episodes

CapX editor John Ashmore interviews the most interesting people in politics
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The CapX Podcast CapX

    • News
    • 4.1 • 28 Ratings

CapX editor John Ashmore interviews the most interesting people in politics
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Vivek Ramaswamy on the woke-industrial complex

    Vivek Ramaswamy on the woke-industrial complex

    There's a new, invisible force at work in the highest ranks of corporate America and it's behind what may be the defining scam of our era. By co-opting social causes and embracing 'wokery' America's biggest companies have pulled the wool over people's eyes, subverting both democracy and the free market capitalism that made the country great.
    But don't take my word for it. Our guest this week, Vivek Ramaswamy, has seen this phenomenon first hand, from Wall Street internships to Ivy League classrooms and then as the CEO of a successful pharmaceutical company, he's witnessed the emergence of the woke-industrial complex.
     
    His recently released book Woke, Inc. takes us behind the scenes, revealing the inner workings of the scam but also offering a better way forward.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 30 min
    Duncan Weldon on 200 years of muddling through

    Duncan Weldon on 200 years of muddling through

    Why is the British economy the way it is today?
    That's the rather daunting exam question The Economist's Duncan Weldon sets himself in his newly released book 200 Years of Muddling Through - The surprising story of Britain's economy from boom to bust and back again.
    It's fair to say that Weldon succeeds in answering it with his pacy, vivid canter through the Industrial Revolution, two World Wars, post-war decline and resurgence in the 1980s, right up to the current crisis.
    We were delighted to get Duncan on to the podcast for a chat about the book and his reflections on the where the British economy may be heading as we recover from the Covid cataclysm.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 44 min
    David Skelton on the New Snobbery

    David Skelton on the New Snobbery

    Long before the Red Wall became a part of our everyday political lexicon, David Skelton was talking and writing about the disconnection between post-industrial Britain and the country's political class. 
    Skelton's latest book 'The New Snobbery' is partly a polemic about the disdain and condescension voters in these communities have faced from so-called progressives, particularly since the Brexit referendum. But it's also a call to arms to offer a new settlement for communities that have for too long been kept on the margins of Britain's political, economic and cultural life.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 47 min
    Frank Luntz on the New Language of Politics

    Frank Luntz on the New Language of Politics

    Few people know more about the language of politics and how to effectively communicate with the public than Frank Luntz.
     
    As an award winning political and communications consultant, pollster and pundit, Dr. Luntz has served as an election consultant and commentator in national elections across the globe. He has worked for more than 50 Fortune 500 companies and CEOs, and he is the author of three New York Times bestsellers. He also has friends in high places, having conducted his very first political polling for the Oxford Union campaign of one Boris Johnson.
     
    For the last six weeks Frank has been a Visiting Fellow at our parent organisation, the Centre for Policy Studies. During that time he's been conducting a mega-survey of British public opinion, delving in huge detail into our attitudes to moral values, capitalism, technology and the culture wars. We sat down to discuss the new centre of gravity of British politics, and why Frank sees himself as a 'reverse Paul Revere', journeying across the Atlantic to warn us 'the Americans are coming'.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 34 min
    Niall Ferguson on the Politics of Catastrophe

    Niall Ferguson on the Politics of Catastrophe

    From the eruption of Vesuvius to the Chernobyl meltdown, human history has always been punctuated by catastrophes - some natural, others very much man-made.
     
    In his new book Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe, world-renowned historian Professor Niall Ferguson argues that far from being "unprecedented", the response to Covid-19 exhibits the same political and social pathologies that have shaped so many previous crises. Moreover, we can't hope to understand the pandemic without a keen appreciation of the history of economics, society, culture and politics.
    The latest episode of the CapX Podcast is a recording of our CapX Live event with Professor Ferguson – a typically lively, entertaining and thought-provoking discussion with our editor-in-chief, Robert Colvile.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 54 min
    The Aristocracy of Talent

    The Aristocracy of Talent

    Meritocracy is the creed of our age. An idea that has great success in crossing traditional boundaries: not just Thatcher, Reagan and Boris Johnson, but Clinton, Blair and Xi Jinping have sung the praises of a society where anyone can rise based on their own talent and effort. 
    But just as meritocracy has risen to be the dominant idea of our age, it's faced an onslaught of criticism, from the traditional left who saw it as a betrayal of principles of equality and solidarity, contemporary social justice activists who regard it as just another instrument of white power, and conservatives who fear it undermines the bonds of community and tradition.
    Most interesting though are the trenchant critiques from some of those at the heart of the meritocratic system, like the Yale Law professor who calls it a "sham"- an excuse for the wealthy to game the system and pass on their privilege to the younger generation.
    These are some of the questions that preoccupy Adrian Wooldridge, the political editor of The Economist, in his latest book, the Aristocracy of Talent. This episode of the CapX Podcast is a recording of a CapX Live interview with Adrian last week where we discussed the history of the meritocratic idea from Plato to the present day, how supposedly meritocratic societies have been corrupted and laid low by old-fashioned cronyism, and how we can go about correcting that.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 57 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
28 Ratings

28 Ratings

GriefWell ,

Lacks polish, but has potential

Good guests and smart, interesting conversations.

Like a lot of podcasts in their early days, it lacks polish. Sound quality needs improving. Host needs to be clearer in introducing his guests and stating what will be discussed. It feels like he's sitting down with his chums for a chat and glass of wine, but given that the conversations are of a very good standard, that's okay.

Rather than starting and finishing the conversation so abruptly, I'd like it if they began and ended with clear introductions and conclusions. Give it a sense of purpose and direction.

Given that the quality of guests seems like it will be strong for those interested in politics, I'd suggest subscribing despite these teething issues.

MrGareth ,

Cracking content

Time and again content that isn’t just following the popular crowd, CapX are producing some absolute corkers and I’m really enjoying it.

Rusty Loon ,

Good but...

...a bit low fi for starters. Volume quite low often – hard to hear when listening on headphones on busy roads. Wiseman is bright but not a great speaker – a lot of ums, ahs and ‘sort of’s. But some good thought provoking content nonetheless.

Top Podcasts In News

Listeners Also Subscribed To