100 episodes

In each episode we ask a leading historian, novelist or public figure the tantalising question, "If you could travel back through time, which year would you visit?" Once they have made their choice, then they guide us through that year in three telling scenes. We have visited Pompeii in 79AD, Jerusalem in 1187, the Tower of London in 1483, Colonial America in 1776, 10 Downing Street in 1940 and the Moon in 1969. Chosen as one of the Evening Standard's Best History Podcasts of 2020. Presented weekly by Sunday Times bestselling writer Peter Moore, award-winning historian Violet Moller and Artemis Irvine.

Travels Through Time Travels Through Time

    • History
    • 4.7 • 57 Ratings

In each episode we ask a leading historian, novelist or public figure the tantalising question, "If you could travel back through time, which year would you visit?" Once they have made their choice, then they guide us through that year in three telling scenes. We have visited Pompeii in 79AD, Jerusalem in 1187, the Tower of London in 1483, Colonial America in 1776, 10 Downing Street in 1940 and the Moon in 1969. Chosen as one of the Evening Standard's Best History Podcasts of 2020. Presented weekly by Sunday Times bestselling writer Peter Moore, award-winning historian Violet Moller and Artemis Irvine.

    [Special] The Grigoryan Brothers: Australia

    [Special] The Grigoryan Brothers: Australia

    In this special episode the multi-award winning guitarists Slava and Leonard Grigoryan take us back into Australian history in three enchanting pieces of music. Each track features on their acclaimed album, This Is Us, which arose out of a collaborative project with the National Museum of Australia.
    ***
    Over the past two decades the Grigoryan Brothers have established themselves as among the finest Australian musicians of their generation. Several years ago, following a chance meeting at a concert in Adelaide, they were invited to begin an unusual collaboration with the National Museum of Australia in Canberra.
    To mark its twentieth birthday the museum invited the brothers to select a series of objects from its collections and to use them as the inspiration for a series of original compositions. The project went forward during the Covid 19 Pandemic and in 2021 the resulting album, This Is Us, was published.
    The music engages with a broad range of fascinating Australian histories, from ones connected with the Aboriginal and Torres Islander Strait peoples, to the cricketing feats of Donald Bradman, and those of the nineteenth-century astronomers who first scoured the southern skies.
    In a departure from our usual format, we did not ask Slava and Leonard to pick one calendar year. Instead we invited them to play three songs and to tell us about the objects that inspired them. 
    This Is Us by the Grigoryan Brothers is streaming now. Read more about the project at the National Museum of Australia’s website.
    Show notes
    Song One: ‘Love Token’ – inspired by the convicts’ love tokens.
    Song Two: ‘Stolen’ – inspired by a gate salvaged from a children’s home.
    Song Three: ‘Fortunate Wind’ – inspired by an anchor belonging to HMS Investigator
    Years: c.1932 / 1950s.
    People/Social
    Presenter: Peter Moore
    Guest: Slava and Leonard Grigoryan
    Production: Matt Hiley in Sydney / Maria Nolan in London
    Podcast partner: Ace Cultural Tours
    Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_

    • 58 min
    Elizabeth Wilson: Playing with Fire (1921)

    Elizabeth Wilson: Playing with Fire (1921)

    This week, the performer and author Elizabeth Wilson speaks to Artemis from the offices of Yale University Press in Bedford Square. Elizabeth tells us about the early life of a remarkable pianist, Maria Yudina, who rose to fame in Stalin’s Russia.
    Maria Yudina was born in 1899 to a Jewish family in Nevel, a small town which now sits close to Russia’s border with Belarus. Legend has it that Maria was Stalin’s favourite pianist. Those who have seen Armando Iannucci’s satirical film The Death of Stalin may remember the opening scene in which a pianist is forced to repeat her live performance so that a recording can be made of it and sent to Stalin. As Elizabeth explains in her new biography of the musician, Playing with Fire, the provenance of this story and whether it is about Maria is unclear. However, there is no shortage of fascinating and true stories about Maria, as Elizabeth shows us in this conversation.
    Maria came of age as the February revolution broke out in St Petersburg, where she was studying music. She took part briefly – even accidentally firing a rifle through a ceiling – before being questioned by a teacher from the conservatoire where she was studying. For most of her life though, Maria wasn’t a revolutionary but an intellectual. Her social circle was made up of the leading figures of Russia’s intelligentsia, including Boris Pasternak, Pavel Florensky, and Mikhail Bakhtin. 
    In this episode we visit Maria in 1921, the year she graduated from the conservatoire and was appointed as a member of staff aged just 21. It was also a year in which the relationship between Russia’s new revolutionary state and the country’s artists and intellectuals felt uneasy and, at times, destructive. 
     
    Show notes:
    Scene One: Maria’s graduation ceremony.
    Scene Two: Maria’s debut performance in Petrograd, which coincides with the poet Alexander Blok’s death and funeral. 
    Scene Three: The end of the civil war and the introduction of NEP.
    Memento: A chess set which shows pieces representing 2 sides of the Russian Civil War.
     
    People/Social
    Presenter: Artemis Irvine
    Guest: Elizabeth Wilson
    Production: Maria Nolan
    Podcast partner: Ace Cultural Tours
    Theme music: ‘Love Token’ from the album ‘This Is Us’ By Slava and Leonard Grigoryan
    Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_
    Or on Facebook
    See where 1921 fits on our Timeline

    • 55 min
    Murray Pittock: Scotland Reborn (1967)

    Murray Pittock: Scotland Reborn (1967)

    On 2 November 1967 Winnie Ewing shocked the political establishment when she won the Scottish seat of Hamilton for the Scottish National Party. As today’s guest, Professor Murray Pittock explains, so began a month that would radically re-shape modern British politics.
    ***
    For British politics the 1960s was a testing time. While the country experienced its fabled cultural flowering, it simultaneously had to come to terms with its reduced place in the world. Decolonisation was going ahead at pace. Sterling was losing its power as a currency. In geo-politics Britain did not know where to turn: to the United States, or towards Europe and the EEC.
    In this episode Murray Pittock shows how Britain was forced to confront all of these issues within the space of one single month. November 1967 opened with a political shock, when the young politician Winnie Ewing won a bi-election for the Scottish National Party. During her campaign she made use of a gripping slogan: ‘Stop the World: Scotland Wants to Get On.’
    Here was an early sign of something to come. And as the SNP rose north of the border, more trouble was simmering to the south in Westminster. Soon the Chancellor of the Exchequer, James Callaghan, would be obliged to resign. And in Europe, too, Charles de Gaulle was poised to make matters still worse.
    Professor Murray Pittock is one of Scotland’s foremost living historians. He is the Bradley Chair at the University of Glasgow, where he is also Pro-Vice Principal. He is the author of many books, the most recent of which is Scotland: The Global History: 1603 to the Present.
    Show notes
    Scene One: 2 November 1967: Winnie Ewing wins the Hamilton by-election a total surprise, with the victory slogan ‘Stop the World: Scotland wants to get on’.
    Scene Two: 18 November 1967: sterling devalued against the US $ by 14%; Chancellor of the Exchequer resigns.
    Scene Three: 27 November 1967: UK application to join EEC vetoed for a second time by de Gaulle.
    Memento: $1 Silver Certificate banknote
    People/Social
    Presenter: Violet Moller
    Guest: Professor Murray Pittock
    Production: Maria Nolan
    Podcast partner: Ace Cultural Tours
    Theme music: ‘Love Token’ from the album ‘This Is Us’ By Slava and Leonard Grigoryan
    Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_
    Or on Facebook
    See where 1967 fits on our Timeline

    • 49 min
    Jane Draycott: Antony and Cleopatra (31/30 BCE)

    Jane Draycott: Antony and Cleopatra (31/30 BCE)

    This week the Roman historian and archaeologist Jane Draycott takes us to meet one of history’s most glamorous and infamous couples, Antony and Cleopatra. We join them in a crucial year in the history of Ancient Rome, around 31/30 BCE, when the Roman republic fell away and Octavian – later Emperor Augustus – seized power and founded the Roman Empire, with disastrous consequences for Antony, Cleopatra and their children.This dramatic piece of history forms the origin story of Cleopatra Selene, Antony and Cleopatra’s only daughter and the subject of Jane’s fascinating new book, Cleopatra’s Daughter: Egyptian Princess, Roman Prisoner, African Queen. In this episode we explore the years leading up to the Battle of Actium as well as the battle itself and Antony and Cleopatra’s subsequent suicides. We unravel the truth behind some of the most famous stories about the couple, and explore the nature of female political power in the ancient world. 
     
    Show notesScene One: 2nd September 31 BCE. The Battle of Actium.Scene Two: 1st August 30 BCE. Octavian captures Alexandria and the suicide of Mark Antony. Scene Three: 10th August 30 BCE. The suicide of Cleopatra. Momento: Cleopatra’s long-lost mausoleum.
     
    People/SocialPresenter: Artemis IrvineGuest: Jane DraycottProduction: Maria NolanPodcast partner: Ace Cultural ToursTheme music: ‘Love Token’ from the album ‘This Is Us’ By Slava and Leonard GrigoryanFollow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_Or on FacebookSee where 31/30 BCE fits on our Timeline

    • 58 min
    James Holland: D-Day with the Sherwood Rangers (1944)

    James Holland: D-Day with the Sherwood Rangers (1944)

    This Remembrance Week the best-selling historian James Holland takes us back to a crucial year in the Second World War. We travel to Gold Beach on D-Day and then into the country lanes of Normandy on the trail of the Sherwood Rangers.
    *
    On the damp and blustery morning of 6 June 1944 the Sherwood Rangers fought their way onto Gold Beach. An armoured regiment, filled with Sherman tanks, the Sherwood Rangers had already had an exhausting war. From Palestine to North Africa, the young men in its ranks had been involved in much bitter fighting. Now, as D-Day began, the regiment began its bloodiest campaign yet.
    This week’s guest, James Holland, takes us back to that time. He tells us about some of the Sherwood Rangers’ memorable individuals – men like the charismatic Stanley Christopherson and the awe-inspiring John Semken.
    He explains the dilemma that confronted the Rangers as they tried to establish a beachhead on D-Day and he takes us back to a moment of huge personal bravery several weeks later as the Battle for Normandy played out.
    Last of all, we see the Rangers on Christmas Day – exhausted, depleted but still with their humour and humanity.
    The stories that feature in this week’s episode come from James Holland’s latest book. Brothers in Arms: One Legendary Tank Regiment's Bloody War from D-Day to VE-Day .
    Show notes
    Scene One: Tuesday, 6 June - Gold Beach, Normandy
    Scene Two: Monday, 26 June - Rauray Ridge, Normandy
    Scene Three: Monday, 25 December - Schinnen, Netherlands
    Memento: Sgt. George Dring’s tank Akilla
    People/Social
    Presenter: Peter Moore
    Guest: James Holland
    Production: Maria Nolan
    Podcast partner: Ace Cultural Tours
    Theme music: ‘Love Token’ from the album ‘This Is Us’ By Slava and Leonard Grigoryan
    Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_
    Or on Facebook
    See where 1944 fits on our Timeline

    • 56 min
    Giles Milton: Yalta and the Race for Berlin (1945)

    Giles Milton: Yalta and the Race for Berlin (1945)

    As 1945 began the greatest conflict in human history was drawing to a close. But with the war in the west almost over, a new question was increasingly being asked. It was one to which Joseph Stalin, Winston Churchill and Franklin D Roosevelt all had different answers. What was going to happen next?
    In this episode the million-copy bestselling author Giles Milton takes us back to some key moments in 1945. At Yalta on the Crimean peninsula and later in the ruins of Berlin, the shape of the post war world – the world we know today – was beginning to take shape.
    What is clear now was not so then. Were the Allies really friends or were, as Churchil worried to Anthony Eden, they hurtling towards a third world war? Arriving in Berlin at the start of July 1945, the US army colonel Frank Howley feared much the same. As Milton explains, it was Howley who saw before almost anyone else that the Germans had ceased to be enemies and the Russians had ceased to be friends.
    The characters and stories that feature in this episode of Travels Through Time form part of Milton’s latest book. Checkmate in Berlin: The Cold War Showdown That Shaped the Modern World.
    Show notes
    Scene One: 4 February 1945. Yalta. Opening of the Crimea Conference
    Scene Two: 2 May 1945. Berlin. Yevgeny Khaldei takes a photograph of the Soviet flag being raised over the Reichstag
    Scene Three: 1 July 1945. Berlin. Colonel Howley arrives
    Memento: A little of the Schliemann Gold
    People/Social
    Presenter: Peter Moore
    Guest: Giles Milton
    Production: Maria Nolan
    Podcast partner: Ace Cultural Tours
    Theme music: ‘Love Token’ from the album ‘This Is Us’ By Slava and Leonard Grigoryan
    Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_
    Or on Facebook
    See where 1945 fits on our Timeline

    • 59 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
57 Ratings

57 Ratings

jodie_cass ,

Fantastic!!

One of my favourites! Very easy to listen to!

swadeathone ,

Wonderful

A great format for a deep dive into a moment in history

Harry g c ,

Brilliant podcast

An excellent and insightful show

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