58 episodes

In each episode we ask one of the world's leading historians the tantalising question: "If you could travel back through time, what year would you visit?" They make their choice and then they tell us why. Presented by Sunday Times bestselling author Peter Moore.

Travels Through Time Travels Through Time

    • History
    • 4.7 • 39 Ratings

In each episode we ask one of the world's leading historians the tantalising question: "If you could travel back through time, what year would you visit?" They make their choice and then they tell us why. Presented by Sunday Times bestselling author Peter Moore.

    Paul Cartledge: The Battle of Thermopylae (480 BCE)

    Paul Cartledge: The Battle of Thermopylae (480 BCE)

    In this episode of Travels Through Time, British ancient historian and academic Professor Paul Cartledge, takes us back to the 'Graeco-Persian Wars' to visit a major event in the history of western civilisation and culture.

    • 53 min
    Stuart Clark: The Space Age (1957)

    Stuart Clark: The Space Age (1957)

    In October 1957 the Soviets launched Sputnik 1 and the Space Age began. In this episode of Travels Through Time the astronomer and science writer Stuart Clark takes us back to the dramatic heart of this story.
    We look at Sputnik’s brilliant engineer Sergei Korolev, witness the reaction to the launch in the United States, and then we head to the office of the American journalist Alexander Marshack, whose fascination with the night sky was about to propel him into the depths of time.
    The scenes and characters mentioned in this episode feature in Stuart Clark’s new book, Beneath the Sky. To win a copy of this book as well as a striking colourised print from Jordan Lloyd of Colorgraph, sign up to our newsletter at tttpodcast.com
    Stuart Clark's Beneath the Night: How the stars have shaped the history of humankind (Faber) is out now and available on Amazon.
    Show notes
    Scene One: 4 October, 1957, with Korolev for the launch of the first satellite Sputnik 1
    Scene Two: October 1957, with future NASA engineer Homer Hickam in West Virginia as he looked up into the night sky, saw Sputnik and felt awe-struck inspiration
    Scene Three: Late 1957, To be in the office of American journalist Alexander Marshack in the aftermath of the launch, as he tried to put things together and make sense of why humans wanted to ’touch’ the night sky
    Memento: Korolev’s radio receiver
    People
    Presenter: Peter Moore
    Guest: Dr Stuart Clark
    Production: Maria Nolan
    Podcast partner: Colorgraph
    Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_
    See where 1957 fits on our Timeline

    • 54 min
    Michèle Mendelssohn: Making Oscar Wilde (1882)

    Michèle Mendelssohn: Making Oscar Wilde (1882)

    We have a very powerful image of Oscar Wilde today. He is remembered as a master of wit and style, and champion of the beautiful. But how was this identity constructed? How was he viewed by his contemporaries?
    In this episode the author and academic Michèle Mendelssohn takes us back to 1882 and Wilde's lecture tour of the United States of America to find out. This year marked, she explains, ‘the beginning of Wilde’s ascent into the great character that we now know.’
    The material covered in this episode of Travels Through Time comes from Michèle Mendelssohn’s latest book, Making Oscar Wilde, which was a book of the year in the Sunday Times and the Times Literary Supplement and a semi-finalist for the 2019 PEN America Biography Prize.
    For much, much more, head to https://www.tttpodcast.com/
    Show notes
    Scene One: 9 January 1882, Wilde’s first lecture, The Chickering Hall, New York
    Scene Two: 18 January 1882, Camden, New Jersey: Wilde visits the poet Walt Whitman
    Scene Three: 27 June, Biloxi, Mississippi. Wilde visits the Confederate leader Jefferson Davis
    Memento: Oscar Wilde’s fur coat


    People
    Presenter: Peter Moore
    Guest: Michèle Mendelssohn
    Production: Maria Nolan
    Podcast partner: Colorgraph
    Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_
    See where 1882 fits on our Timeline

    • 53 min
    Catherine Fletcher: The Beauty and the Terror (1492)

    Catherine Fletcher: The Beauty and the Terror (1492)

    In this episode Professor Catherine Fletcher takes us back to 1492 and the heart of the Renaissance. She takes us to the deathbed of one of the most powerful figures in Italy; to the Conclave of cardinals that was gathering to elect a new pope; and across the Atlantic to see Christopher Columbus approaching a New World.
    Catherine Fletcher is Professor of History at Manchester Metropolitan University.
    The discussion in this episode of Travels Through Time is drawn from the events described in Catherine's new book, The Beauty and the Terror recently published in hardback by the Bodley Head in the UK and by Oxford University Press in the USA.
    For much, much more, head to https://www.tttpodcast.com/
    Show notes
    Scene One: In an ornate villa in Careggi on the outskirts of Florence Lorenzo ‘the Magnificent’ de’ Medici lies dying.
    Scene Two: The Sistine Chapel in the Vatican. Pope Innocent VIII, whose territories spanned a swathe of the peninsula from Rome to Ravenna on the Adriatic coast, has died so the traditional process of conclave begins in the Sistine Chapel
    Scene Three: Friday 12th October, the Bahamas in the West Indies. Christopher Columbus sights land and arrives on the coast of an island called Guanahaní with his crew of explorers.
    Memento: A handful of Lorenzo’s extraordinary collection of antique jewellery.
    People
    Presenter: Peter Moore
    Interview: Violet Moller
    Guest: Professor Catherine Fletcher
    Production: Maria Nolan
    Podcast partner: Colorgraph
    Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_
    See where 1492 fits on our Timeline

    • 46 min
    Selma van de Perre: Liberation (1945)

    Selma van de Perre: Liberation (1945)

    Welcome to a different and very special episode of Travels Through Time. Today’s interviewee is the extraordinary Holocaust survivor and resistance fighter Selma van de Perre. At the age of ninety-eight, three quarters of a century after she was liberated from Ravensbrück Concentration Camp, Selma tells us her remarkable story and takes us back to the events of 1945.
    This interview took place on the eve of the British publication of Selma's memoir, My Name is Selma. We're very grateful to Selma and to Ariana Neumann, the New York Times Bestselling author of When Time Stopped, who conducted this interview on our behalf.
    As ever, much much more about this episode can be found at www.tttpodcast.com
    Show notes
    Scene One: 23 April 1945. A man from the Swedish Red Cross arrives at Ravensbrück. He offers the imprisoned women chocolate and cigarettes.
    Scene Two: Late April 1945, After leaving Ravensbrück for Sweden, the aid convoy is mistakenly attacked by the British.
    Scene Three: Late May/early June 1945. At a refugee “holiday”camp in Sweden. Selma is in the dining room and hears someone call her by her real name for the first time in years.
    Memento: A dressing gown, specially made by the Swedish family that Selma stayed with after being liberated
    People
    Presenter: Peter Moore
    Interview: Ariana Neumann
    Guest: Selma van de Perre
    Production: Maria Nolan
    Podcast partner: Colorgraph
    Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_
    See where 1945 fits on our Timeline

    • 43 min
    Hugh Aldersey-Williams: Christiaan Huygens (1655)

    Hugh Aldersey-Williams: Christiaan Huygens (1655)

    In this episode of Travels Through Time the author and journalist Hugh Aldersey-Williams takes us back to 1655 and the vibrant heart of the Dutch Golden Age to meet Christiaan Huygens, a figure oddly forgotten by us today but who was once venerated as the greatest mathematician, astronomer and physicist of his age.
    Hugh guides us back to the year 1655 to see Christiaan make his thrilling discovery of one of Saturn's moons; to watch him struggle with the mathematical problem of pendular motion, and to follow him as he enters Paris - the city he would come to love - for the very first time.
    Much much more about the scenes, characters and materials discussed in this conversation can be found at www.tttpodcast.com
    The discussion in this episode of Travels Through Time arises from the characters and events described by Hugh Aldersey-Williams in his new book, Dutch Light: Christiaan Huygens and the making of science in Europe which is recently published in hardback by Picador
    Show notes
    Scene One: 25 March 1655. With Christiaan and his telescope in the garden of the Huygens’s house in The Hague. The discovery of Saturn’s moon later to be called Titan.
    Scene Two: 4 March 1655, Huygens recommends a Polish inventor’s clock for Dutch patent, demonstrating that he is already thinking about the problem of pendular motion.
    Scene Three: 23 July 1655, Huygens arrives in Paris - the city that he would grow to love - for the very first time
    Memento: One of Huygens’s magic lanterns
    People
    Presenter: Peter Moore
    Guest: Hugh Aldersey-Williams
    Production: Maria Nolan
    Podcast partner: Colorgraph
    Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_
    See where 1655 fits on our Timeline

    • 53 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
39 Ratings

39 Ratings

Devon Cox ,

Highly recommended podcast

One of my favourite podcasts which gives a detailed, illuminating, and insightful approach to history. Through the lens of specific years in time, chosen by an eminent guest historian, each episode presents three unique and pivotal scenes from that particular year. Often these are fleeting and long-forgotten moments that have been lost in grand sweeping historical accounts. However, by magnifying these particular moments, Peter Moore and his many distinguished guests, are able to zoom into the past, flesh out these scenes in greater detail, and examine their relevance in history, and their impact on our world today. I highly recommend this series and eagerly look forward to more!

percy the pig ,

One of my favourites⭐️

Love this podcast - kind of like a historical Desert Island Discs. I discovered it because the presenter, Peter Moore, is one of my favourite historians and I saw this advertised after reading his latest book Endeavour (another top recommendation 👌🏼). He gets some quality guests on and I’ve discovered new writers through his show too. Defo one to subscribe to.

Graham Hick ,

Grahame Hick

Fantastic podcast. There are some OPD history pods out there, but this is right up there

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