18 episodes

Welcome to We are the University, a podcast which opens a window on to the people that make Cambridge University unique. Students, archivists, professors, alumni: all have a story to share.

We Are The University University of Cambridge

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 4 Ratings

Welcome to We are the University, a podcast which opens a window on to the people that make Cambridge University unique. Students, archivists, professors, alumni: all have a story to share.

    Welcome to Mind Over Chatter, the Cambridge University Podcast!

    Welcome to Mind Over Chatter, the Cambridge University Podcast!

    Welcome to Mind Over Chatter, the Cambridge University Podcast!
    One series at a time, we break down complex issues into simple questions.
    Subscribe here: https://mind-over-chatter.captivate.fm/listen (https://mind-over-chatter.captivate.fm/listen)
    In this first series, we’ll explore climate change. Climate change is likely to affect almost every area of our lives… like a toddler with sticky fingers. But how did it become this way? What are we doing about it now? And what does the future hold?
    We’ll ask smart people some simple questions and see what happens!

    • 42 min
    How organisational culture works, without an office - Jennifer Howard-Grenville

    How organisational culture works, without an office - Jennifer Howard-Grenville

    We speak to Jennifer Howard-Grenville, Diageo Professor in Organisation Studies, at the Cambridge Judge Business School.
    This is a fascinating conversation, we look at organisational culture through an 800 year old lens, by examining how Cambridge University sustains and conveys a culture.
    Jennifer debunks the myths about organisation culture and explains how organisational culture is more than a mere “statement of values” but instead reflects the practices and expectations of people working together.
    We also discuss what the future of work might look like post Covid-19 and how organisations and leaders can maintain a culture after the shift to remote working
    We look at organisational culture through an 800 year old lens, when we discuss how Cambridge University conveys and sustains a culture.
    Jennifer debunks the myths about organisation culture and explains how it can be broken down into practices and beliefs, rather than physical environments and rituals.
    More infohttps://www.jbs.cam.ac.uk/faculty-research/faculty-a-z/jennifer-howard-grenville/ (https://www.jbs.cam.ac.uk/faculty-research/faculty-a-z/jennifer-howard-grenville/)
    https://sloanreview.mit.edu/video/sustaining-culture-when-everyones-remote/ (https://sloanreview.mit.edu/video/sustaining-culture-when-everyones-remote/)

    • 32 min
    How to create racial equality at the workplace - Kamal Munir

    How to create racial equality at the workplace - Kamal Munir

    In this episode Dr Kamal Munir, reader in strategy and policy at the Cambridge Judge Business School, joins us to talk about how racial inequality is reproduced in organisations and why it continues to escape scrutiny.

    We think about how the Black Lives Matter protests have prompted organisations to do some soul-searching, and we explore some practical solutions to achieving racial equality at the workplace.

    • 28 min
    Left out of the conversation: Teenagers and Covid-19 - Sarah-Jayne Blakemore

    Left out of the conversation: Teenagers and Covid-19 - Sarah-Jayne Blakemore

    In this episode we speak to Professor Sarah-Jane Blakemore from the Department of Psychology, about the adolescent brain and the return to school.
    We think about the effects of social isolation on teenagers, the long term impact of Covid-19 and we ask if we are doing the right thing by having students return to university during a pandemic.
    Sarah-Jayne Blakemore is Professor of Psychology and leader of the Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience Group. Her group's research focuses on the development of social cognition and decision-making in the human adolescent brain, and adolescent mental health, running behavioural studies in schools and in the lab, and neuroimaging studies, with adolescents and adults.
    More Information:
    https://sites.google.com/site/blakemorelab/
    Twitter - https://twitter.com/sjblakemore
    Transcript
    1
    Speaker 1
    0:00
    Hello, and welcome to the university. I'm your host, Nick Saffell. In this episode, we speak just Professor Sarah Jane Blakemore, from the Department of Psychology, about the adolescent brain and the return to school, we think about the effects of social isolation on teenagers, the long term impact of COVID-19. And we asked if we are doing the right thing by having students returned to university during a pandemic. We all know that the return to school is looking different this year, from a teenager's point of view, what are some of the biggest differences. So some might be that things are missing, but some might be real pluses.
    2
    Speaker 2
    0:37
    Cool is very different. It has a lot of young people that are limited to one or a very small number of classrooms for that essence, to try to minimize movement around the school. There are one way systems they the shedule of the day has changed. Of course, there is isolation, if they get a any of the symptoms of covid. And those symptoms are not, you know, completely unambiguous. So if children are getting colds, often families or schools are worried that they might have covid. So that means they have to stay off school until they get it anyway, it's very, very disrupted education. And I mean, I don't have any good solutions to this, I think schools are, are kind of firefighting in a very, very difficult circumstances. And actually, the schools that I know of are mostly doing a really great job in tough circumstances where there's a lot of worry around, and anxiety. But ultimately, the school teachers head teachers really care about educating the young people there. I mean, young people are, you know, can be quite resilient and adaptive. So, young people I have spoken to my own children, their friends, young people I work with, seem to be coping quite well, with with school with going back to school, what I think they found particularly difficult was locked out and not being in school for so many months, many teenagers were not in school for a period of six months when they should have been. And that really is difficult, not only because of the lack of learning, of education of education, academic subjects, but also because of the lack of social interaction and routine and structure that school provides that I think, is what young people that I know, found particularly challenging. Do you think teenagers are sort of taking it in their stride, then I think there are a huge, huge individual differences, some teenagers seem to be coping really well. Others have really suffered over the last few months, partly because of the lack of social interaction face to face social interaction, in the constant changes of rules with regard to social interaction, and also anxiety, anxiety about the virus about family members getting the virus that has affected young people in many different ways. And some, some are more resilient to it than others, just just as adults,
    1
    Speaker 1
    3:02
    we're hearing a lot about the sort of behavior of young people respect to the spreading

    • 24 min
    Reimagining the future of the post Covid-19 university - Simone Eringfeld

    Reimagining the future of the post Covid-19 university - Simone Eringfeld

    In this episode, we speak to Simone Eringfeld, MPhil student at the Faculty of Education and producer of the https://open.spotify.com/show/4uSKKUKsoKHzve3UC7TRCC (Cambridge Quaranchats) podcast.
    We talk about education in the time of Covid-19, how the move to online education will affect the idea of the university and how she sees the disruption as an opportunity to reimagine the future of the post Covid-19 university.
    Simone shares conversations from her Quaranchats podcast where guests reimagine the learners’ journey, possible ways forward, and how institutions like Cambridge might embrace necessary change.
    GuestsSimone Eringfeld https://twitter.com/simoneeringfeld?lang=en (@SimoneEringfeld) MPhil student at the Faculty of Education https://twitter.com/CamEdFac (@CamEDFac) , educationist, writer and photographer. Co-Chair of Cambridge Peace and Education Research Group https://twitter.com/CPERGUK (@CPERGUK)
    Researching ‘post coronial’ futures of Higher Education. Podcast host of https://twitter.com/CamQuaranchats (@CamQuaranchats).

    More infohttp://www.simoneeringfeld.com/ (http://www.simoneeringfeld.com/)
    https://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/ceid/2020/07/09/eringfeld/ (https://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/ceid/2020/07/09/eringfeld/)
    https://www.cam.ac.uk/stories/UE-Simone-Eringfeld (https://www.cam.ac.uk/stories/UE-Simone-Eringfeld)

    • 31 min
    Working parents in the Age of Coronavirus - Helen McCarthy

    Working parents in the Age of Coronavirus - Helen McCarthy

    In this episode:We speak to Dr Helen McCarthy, a Historian of Modern Britain at the Faculty of History and Author of Double Lives: A History of Working Motherhood.
    In recent months, many working parents have had to juggle looking after kids at home with their usual jobs.We talk about how the pandemic has had a disproportionate impact on working mothers.
    We take the historical perspective and the long view to try and make sense of these gender divisions.
    We talk about our reliance on childcare, the broader economic impact of the last few months on women, and how to ensure it is truly valued in the coronavirus recovery.
    Guests:
    Dr Helen McCarthy (https://twitter.com/HistorianHelen (@HistorianHelen)), Historian of Modern Britain at Faculty of History (https://twitter.com/CamHistory (@CamHistory)) and Fellow of St John’s College (https://twitter.com/stjohnscam (@stjohnscam)) Author of Double Lives: A History of Working Motherhood https://twitter.com/BloomsburyBooks (@BloomsburyBooks)
    More Info:
    https://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/people/dr-helen-mccarthy (https://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/people/dr-helen-mccarthy)
    Transcript:
    Unknown Speaker 0:00
    Hello and welcome to the other university, a podcast about the people who make Cambridge University unique. I'm your host, Nick Saffell. In this episode, we speak to Dr. Helen McCarthy, a historian of modern Britain at the Faculty of History, and author of double lives, a history of working motherhood. In recent months, many working parents had to juggle looking after kids at home with their usual jobs. We talked about how the pandemic has had a disproportionate impact on working mothers. We take the historical perspective and the long view to try and make sense of these gender divisions. We talked about our reliance on childcare, the broader economic impact of the last few months on women, and how to ensure it is truly valued in the Coronavirus recovery. Just tell me a little bit about your experience of lockdown so far?
    Helen McCarthy 0:52
    Well, my experience of lockdowns probably fairly similar to that of many other working parents, I've had my two primary school aged children at home for most of it, they managed to get back to school for a few weeks towards the end of the summer term. But it's been pretty intense and pretty full on. I've been trying to do my teaching and my university work. My husband, who's a lawyer, has been working at home doing some virtual court hearings, which has been a new experience for him. And it's been, you know, we've been sort of tag teaming it, trying to sort of muddle through as best we can. But it's been it's been a pretty stressful period.


    Unknown Speaker 1:34
    So do you think it's changed your working practices as a family? With this sort of future mindset? Do you think it's going to change how you'll go about work?


    Helen McCarthy 1:43
    Well, I've talked a lot about this with with my husband, who has only been into his chambers in central London once since the beginning of lockdown. And it certainly seems that for the legal profession, there may very well be a longer term shift towards doing a lot, a lot more online, including potentially quite a lot of court hearings, virtually. So that could be a permanent shift. And I think for universities, for my for my line of work. I mean, online teaching, obviously, is the immediate future for us, because University of Cambridge is, has announced that it will be providing all lectures online, at least for Michaelmas term, and then a great deal of my undergraduate teaching. And master's level teaching will also be online with hopefully a little bit of face to face teaching in there as well. But I don't know I mean, the future is really open, I think it will obviously come down to how soon we get a vaccine, whether we can work out some social distance, teaching methods that work really well. And how the pan

    • 30 min

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