225 episodes

A weekly discussion of current affairs in China with journalists, writers, academics, policy makers, business people and anyone with something compelling to say about the country that's reshaping the world.
A SupChina production, hosted by Kaiser Kuo and Jeremy Goldkorn.

Sinica Podcast SupChina

    • Business

A weekly discussion of current affairs in China with journalists, writers, academics, policy makers, business people and anyone with something compelling to say about the country that's reshaping the world.
A SupChina production, hosted by Kaiser Kuo and Jeremy Goldkorn.

    Military modernization in Xi Jinping’s China

    Military modernization in Xi Jinping’s China

    This week on Sinica, Kaiser chats with Professor Tai Ming Cheung of the University of California, San Diego. Tai is the director of the UC Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation (IGCC) and also a leading expert on Chinese national security and defense modernization. This episode is part of a nine-part series taped in California in December 2019, made possible by the Serica Initiative, SupChina's nonprofit arm.




    5:30: What the international security environment looks like to Xi Jinping

    14:47: How prioritization on national security is implemented

    22:38: How the PLA is funded, and where the money is going

    28:36: Made in China 2025’s military counterpart

    37:33: Beijing’s long march to technological self-reliance

    Recommendations:

    Tai: In the Shadow of the Garrison State, by Aaron L. Friedberg. 

    Kaiser: A new podcast, The Industrial Revolutions, by David Broker.

    • 49 min
    The Hong Kong protests: The view from campus

    The Hong Kong protests: The view from campus

    On this week’s show, Kaiser chats with Alejandro Reyes, an associate professor at the University of Hong Kong and a former senior policy adviser to Canada’s assistant deputy minister for Asia Pacific, about the ongoing Hong Kong protests and the spread of violence to some of Hong Kong’s best-known universities in November. Alejandro offers his take on this phase of the protests, and on how half a year of incessant protests has impacted the mental health of young Hongkongers.




    Recommendations:




    Alejandro: Talking to my mother about Hong Kong, by SupChina columnist Yangyang Cheng. You can find more of her work here.

    Kaiser: The Mosquito: A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator, by Timothy C. Winegard.

    • 1 hr 10 min
    Gary Rieschel of Qiming Venture Partners on VC, tech, and the U.S.-China relationship

    Gary Rieschel of Qiming Venture Partners on VC, tech, and the U.S.-China relationship

    In a show taped in Seattle, Kaiser chats with Gary Rieschel, founding managing partner of Qiming Venture Partners. With 30 unicorns and over 30 exits, Qiming has been one of the most successful VCs in China, investing in numerous companies that have gone on to become household names in the country. Gary reflects on his years in China and the folly of decoupling.

    Recommendations:

    Gary: Atlas Shrugged, by Ayn Rand, and Factfulness, by Hans Rosling. 

    Kaiser: Watchmen, the new show on HBO created by Damon Lindelof. 

    • 1 hr
    A conversation with Gary Locke

    A conversation with Gary Locke

    Gary Locke served as the U.S. ambassador to China from 2011 to 2014. Locke was not only the first Chinese-American ambassador to China, but also the first Chinese-American state governor and secretary of commerce. 

    This week on Sinica, he joins Kaiser in a show taped in Seattle, Washington, to talk about his early visits to his ancestral village in China's Guangdong Province, the attempted defection of Chongqing police chief and erstwhile Bó Xīlái 薄熙来 underling Wáng Lìjūn 王立军 to the U.S. consulate in Chengdu, and rare details about the flight of blind dissident lawyer Chén Guāngchéng 陈光诚 to the U.S. embassy in Beijing.

    7:58: State-level interactions with China

    17:54: Working as the secretary of commerce under President Obama

    33:32: Wang Lijun’s attempted defection 

    41:55: A look back at the Chen Guangcheng debacle 

    1:01:09: Xi Jinping, and how he changed




    Recommendations:

    Gary: Knives Out, written and directed by Rian Johnson, and the movie Parasite, directed by Bong Joon-ho. 

    Kaiser: The blog Reading the China Dream, which contains a collection of translated works of Chinese intellectuals.

    • 1 hr 16 min
    Yangyang Cheng Live at NEXT China

    Yangyang Cheng Live at NEXT China

    In a show taped in front of a live audience at SupChina’s NEXT China conference, Kaiser and Jeremy chatted with particle physicist Yangyang Cheng, one of the boldest new voices writing on science and contemporary China. Get to know the woman behind SupChina’s Science and China column.

    2:38: A day in the life of a particle physicist

    8:26: Scientific research and the state

    15:15: The overlap between politics and science

    24:28: Is technocracy problematic?




    Recommendations:




    Jeremy: A new podcast called You Can Learn Chinese, hosted by John Pasden and Jared Turner.  

    Yangyang: The author James Baldwin and his novels, as well as a collection of short films titled Ten Years, which depict a dystopian future for Hong Kong in the year 2025. 

    Kaiser: Middlemarch, by George Eliot.

    • 35 min
    Big Brother and big data at work in Xinjiang

    Big Brother and big data at work in Xinjiang

    Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian, who covers China for Axios, was the lead reporter on an explosive leak of documents detailing the ongoing repression of Uyghurs and other Muslims in China’s Xinjiang Autonomous Region. This week, she joins Kaiser and Jeremy to discuss her report, titled Exposed: China’s Operating Manuals for Mass Internment and Arrest by Algorithm. The leaks include what she describes as a "manual for operating the camps," and reveal how Chinese police are using big data to identify individuals deemed at risk for Islamic extremism or separatism in Xinjiang.

    9:43: What do the leaks mean?

    14:53: A timeline of events in Xinjiang

    18:57: The “Integrated Joint Operations Platform”

    24:50: The world’s highest-stakes “testing,” in Xinjiang camps

    33:58: What can, and should, the U.S. do?




    Recommendations:




    Jeremy: One Long Night: A Global History of Concentration Camps, by Andrea Pitzer. 

    Bethany: The Origins of Totalitarianism, by Hannah Arendt, a look at totalitarian governments in the 20th century. 

    Kaiser: The December issue of The Atlantic, themed “How to Stop a Civil War.” With an emphasis on a few essays: The dark psychology of social networks, by Jonathan Haidt and Tobias Rose-Stockwell; Too much democracy is bad for democracy, by Jonathan Rauch and Ray La Raja; and The dishonesty of the abortion debate, by Caitlin Flanagan.

    • 48 min

Customer Reviews

NiallerSH ,

Superb podcast for anyone with an interest in China

As a long time listener I feel compelled to write a review. I've developed a keen interest in Chinese current affairs and history since moving to China. This podcast covers a wide range of topics and the guests are often truly fascinating individuals with great stories to tell. I love listening to these stories from people with real, in depth and often first hand knowledge of the topics being discussed. I've learned a lot since listening.

Keep up the good work guys.

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