54 episodes

Gut is a leading international journal in gastroenterology and has an established reputation for publishing first class clinical research of the alimentary tract, the liver, biliary tree and pancreas. Gut delivers up-to-date, authoritative, clinically oriented coverage of all areas in gastroenterology. Regular features include articles by leading authorities, reports on the latest treatments for diseases, reviews and commentaries.Subscribers to Gut also receive Frontline Gastroenterology (FG). Gut has increased its position ranking in the category of the Gastroenterology and Hepatology from 3rd to 2nd, with a new impact factor of 14.921. * The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

Gut podcast BMJ Group

    • Science

Gut is a leading international journal in gastroenterology and has an established reputation for publishing first class clinical research of the alimentary tract, the liver, biliary tree and pancreas. Gut delivers up-to-date, authoritative, clinically oriented coverage of all areas in gastroenterology. Regular features include articles by leading authorities, reports on the latest treatments for diseases, reviews and commentaries.Subscribers to Gut also receive Frontline Gastroenterology (FG). Gut has increased its position ranking in the category of the Gastroenterology and Hepatology from 3rd to 2nd, with a new impact factor of 14.921. * The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

    Guidelines on the management of inflammatory bowel disease in adults

    Guidelines on the management of inflammatory bowel disease in adults

    Dr Christopher Lamb, Clinical Intermediate Fellow at Newcastle University and Honorary Consultant in Gastroenterology at the Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust discusses the BSG guidelines on the management of inflammatory bowel disease in adults with Associate Editor of GUT Dr Philip Smith.
    Read the article: https://gut.bmj.com/content/68/Suppl_3/s1

    • 9 min
    European evidence-based guidelines on pancreatic cystic neoplasms

    European evidence-based guidelines on pancreatic cystic neoplasms

    Evidence-based guidelines on the management of pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCN) are lacking. The guideline discussed in this podcast is a joint initiative of the European Study Group on Cystic Tumours of the Pancreas, United European Gastroenterology, European Pancreatic Club, European-African Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association, European Digestive Surgery, and the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.
    Listen to the discussion between the Education Editor of Gut, Mairi McLean, and Marco del Chiaro, from The European Study Group on Cystic Tumours of the Pancreas. And read the details of the guidelines on the Gut website: https://gut.bmj.com/content/67/5/789.

    • 13 min
    Viral transfer during FMT linked to better outcomes in recurrent C. diff bacterial infections

    Viral transfer during FMT linked to better outcomes in recurrent C. diff bacterial infections

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile, C. diff or CDI) is a bacterium associated with the intake of antibiotics which causes diarrhoea. It is easily spread to others, both in hospital and a household environments.
    C. Diff infections are generally treated with antibiotics. Recurrent infection is successfully treated with faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), however the underlying mechanism of action is not well defined. This study identified a key role of the virome within the transferred stool on treatment responses.
    Listen to the discussion between the Education Editor of Gut, Mairi McLean, and Siew Ng (The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China), who's the leading author of the Open Access paper “Bacteriophage transfer during faecal microbiota transplantation in Clostridium difficile infection is associated with treatment outcome”, included in the April 2018’s Gut issue (gut.bmj.com/content/67/4/634).

    • 17 min
    Colorectal cancer: research prioritisation needed in third most lethal malignancy worldwide

    Colorectal cancer: research prioritisation needed in third most lethal malignancy worldwide

    Prioritising research and funding could have a significant impact on reducing colorectal cancer disease burden over the next 5 years. The conclusions are included in a study recently published by Gut titled “Critical research gaps and recommendations to inform research prioritisation for more effective prevention and improved outcomes in colorectal cancer” and expanded in this podcast.
    In conversation with the journal’s Education Editor Mairi McLean, the leading author of the study, Mark Lawler, identifies 15 critical research gaps which prioritisation and resolution could improve patient outcomes.
    Professor Mark Lawler works at the Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen’s University Belfast, UK.
    For more details on this Open Access article included in the January 2018 issue of Gut, visit http://gut.bmj.com/content/67/1/179.

    • 19 min
    Development of an FGF19-based chimeric molecule to promote fatty liver regeneration

    Development of an FGF19-based chimeric molecule to promote fatty liver regeneration

    In this episode Mairi McLean, Associate Editor of Gut journal, talks to Matias Avila and Carmen Berasai, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. They discuss their published paper "Fibroblast growth factor 15/19 (FGF15/19) protects from diet-induced hepatic steatosis: development of an FGF19-based chimeric molecule to promote fatty liver regeneration".

    Full article >> http://gut.bmj.com/content/66/10/1818.info

    • 23 min
    Feeding the microbiota: transducer of nutrient signals for the host

    Feeding the microbiota: transducer of nutrient signals for the host

    In this episode Mairi McLean, Associate Editor of Gut journal, talks to Fergus Shanahan, Professor and Chair of the Department of Medicine at University College Cork. They discuss his recent paper in Gut entitled "Feeding the microbiota: transducer of nutrient signals for the host"

    Full text - http://gut.bmj.com/content/early/2017/06/29/gutjnl-2017-313872

    • 23 min

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