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New discoveries, everyday mysteries, and the science behind the headlines — in just under 15 minutes. It's science for everyone, using a lot of creativity and a little humor. Join hosts Emily Kwong and Regina Barber for science on a different wavelength.If you're hooked, try Short Wave Plus. Your subscription supports the show and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/shortwave

Short Wave Short Wave

    • Wetenschap
    • 5,0 • 7 beoordelingen

Luister op Apple Podcasts
Vereist abonnement en macOS 11.4 of nieuwer

New discoveries, everyday mysteries, and the science behind the headlines — in just under 15 minutes. It's science for everyone, using a lot of creativity and a little humor. Join hosts Emily Kwong and Regina Barber for science on a different wavelength.If you're hooked, try Short Wave Plus. Your subscription supports the show and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/shortwave

Luister op Apple Podcasts
Vereist abonnement en macOS 11.4 of nieuwer

    Teens Are Following Skincare Trends On TikTok. Some Dermatologists Are Wary

    Teens Are Following Skincare Trends On TikTok. Some Dermatologists Are Wary

    TikTok is fuel for many trends, including a skin care craze among teens, pre-teens — okay, and us. The "glass skin" trend calls for a multi-step routine, often involving pricey products. It's all in pursuit of dewy, seemingly poreless, glowing complexion – like glass. But some dermatologists say these attempts can backfire, irritating, burning and even peeling sensitive pre-teen skin. As teens and tweens have become major consumers of skin care products, dermatologists are seeing more of these cases and are cautioning against these elaborate routines.

    Want more science behind what's going viral? Email us at shortwave@npr.org.

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    • 9 min.
    Like Humans, These Ants Can Perform Leg Amputations To Save Lives

    Like Humans, These Ants Can Perform Leg Amputations To Save Lives

    Some ants herd aphids. Some farm fungi. And now, scientists have realized that when an ant injures its leg, it sometimes will turn to a buddy to perform a lifesaving limb amputation. Not only that — some ants have probably been amputating limbs longer than humans! Today, thanks to the reporting of ant enthusiast and science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce, we behold the medical prowess of the ant.

    Want to hear more cool stories about the tiny critters among us? Email us at shortwave@npr.org — we'd love to know!

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    • 13 min.
    The Invisible Substance That Structures Our Universe

    The Invisible Substance That Structures Our Universe

    The universe is so much bigger than what people can see. Visible matter — the ground, the Sun, the screen you're reading this on — makes up only about 4 or 5 percent of our known universe. Dark matter makes up much more of the universe. It's all around us even though we can't see it. So what is it? What's it made out of? How do we even know it exists? Host Emily Kwong and Rebecca Ramirez try to find out with the help of astrophysicist Priyamvada Natarajan.

    This episode is part of our series Space Camp, all about the weird and mysterious depths of our universe. Check out the full series: https://www.npr.org/spacecamp.

    Our team would love to hear your episode ideas. Email us at shortwave@npr.org.

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    • 14 min.
    Sharks Often Get A Bad Rap, But Oceans Need Them

    Sharks Often Get A Bad Rap, But Oceans Need Them

    It's that time of the year again: Shark Week. The TV program is so long-running that if you're under 37, you've never known a life without it. In honor of this oft misunderstood critter, we revisit our conversation with shark scientist Melissa Christina Marquez. She explains just how important sharks are to keeping the oceans healthy, including their role in mitigating climate change. Plus, there may be some talk about shark poop.

    Have another animal with a bad rap you want us to clear the reputation of? Email the show at shortwave@npr.org — we'd love to hear from you!

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    • 10 min.
    From Cars To Leaf Blowers: Noise Pollution's Toll On Human Health

    From Cars To Leaf Blowers: Noise Pollution's Toll On Human Health

    When's the last time you were in a place that was quiet — really quiet? No roadway noise, construction work or even the hum of a refrigerator. Our world is full of sounds, some of which are harming our health. The World Health Organization says "noise is an underestimated threat." Today, host Emily Kwong talks to health reporter Joanne Silberner about those health costs, what is too loud and some of the history of legislation to limit noise pollution in the United States.

    Read Joanne's full article in Undark Magazine here.

    Curious about other health stories? Email us at shortwave@npr.org.

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    • 12 min.
    Researchers Are Figuring Out How African Ancestry Can Affect Certain Brain Disorders

    Researchers Are Figuring Out How African Ancestry Can Affect Certain Brain Disorders

    Black Americans have been underrepresented in most genomic studies of neurological disorders. As a result, scientists don't know much about whether African ancestry affects a person's risk for these disorders or their response to a particular treatment. To help close this gap, the Lieber Institute for Brain Development, African American community leaders in Baltimore, and researchers from Duke University and Morgan State University created the African Ancestry Neuroscience Research Initiative in 2019. The team found that genes associated with African ancestry appear to affect certain brain cells in ways that could increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease and stroke.

    Read science correspondent Jon Hamilton's full story here.

    Curious about brain science? Email us at shortwave@npr.org.

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    • 13 min.

Klantrecensies

5,0 van 5
7 beoordelingen

7 beoordelingen

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