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Building on a 160-year-history of interviews with the world’s most consequential figures, the podcast brings the power of the Atlantic interview to the audio platform—and continues the publisher’s push to bring its journalism to more people in more ways. Jeffrey Goldberg, Editor in Chief talks to some of the most pivotal voices shaping politics, technology, art, media, business, and culture.

The Atlantic Interview The Atlantic

    • Maatschappij & cultuur

Building on a 160-year-history of interviews with the world’s most consequential figures, the podcast brings the power of the Atlantic interview to the audio platform—and continues the publisher’s push to bring its journalism to more people in more ways. Jeffrey Goldberg, Editor in Chief talks to some of the most pivotal voices shaping politics, technology, art, media, business, and culture.

    Introducing Crazy/Genius: Should We Break Up Amazon?

    Introducing Crazy/Genius: Should We Break Up Amazon?

    Today, we bring you the second episode of our new show Crazy/Genius, hosted by Atlantic staff writer Derek Thompson. In this episode, Derek asks if Amazon –  which may soon be the first trillion-dollar company in the history of the world – has become a dangerous monopoly threatening the U.S. economy.
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    • 23 min.
    Yossi Klein Halevi

    Yossi Klein Halevi

    “I discovered the reality and the power of Palestinian identity by getting a rock thrown at my head.” Israel author Yossi Klein Halevi joins The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg to discuss the conflict in the Middle East and his new book Letters to My Palestinian Neighbor. Halevi shares how he believes Israelis need to both remember that they live in a world where genocide is possible and to remember that they were strangers in the land of Egypt. “And if you don’t have both of those sensibilities, then you are a one-dimensional Jew,” says Halevi.
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    • 33 min.
    Pete Souza

    Pete Souza

    Pete Souza spent eight years photographing the Obama White House, an effort he now chronicles his new book Obama: An Intimate Portrait. Souza joins The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg to share the stories behind his most famous photos: a 5-year-old boy patting the president's head, the tense scene in the Situation Room during the mission against Osama bin Laden, and many more. What was it like to be a fly on the wall in the West Wing?
    (View the photos discussed here.)
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    • 33 min.
    Madeleine Albright

    Madeleine Albright

    Madeleine Albright considers Donald Trump "the first antidemocratic president in modern U.S. history." Alarmed at the rise in authoritarian tendencies around the world, the former Secretary of State has written a new book, Fascism: A Warning. Twice a refugee of her native Czechoslovakia – first from the Nazi invasion, then later from the Communist coup – Albright is all too familiar with the loss of democracy. In a conversation on stage at Sixth & I with The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg, Albright shares her thoughts on President Trump, her worries about fascism, and what it’s like to get interrupted by a porn star. 
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    • 40 min.
    Michele Norris

    Michele Norris

    "For decades, examining race in America meant focusing on the advancement and struggles of people of color. Under this framework, being white was simply the default," writes Michele Norris in National Geographic's issue on race. Previously a host of NPR's All Things Considered, Norris is now the Director of The Bridge – the Aspen Institute's new program on race, identity and inclusion – building on her work as the founder of The Race Card Project. She tells The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg that the public clashes over race may get our attention, but they also distract from the private conversations going on across America.
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    • 36 min.
    Mitch Landrieu

    Mitch Landrieu

    "There is a difference between remembrance of history and reverence of it," said New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu in his now-famous speech in May of 2017. As Landrieu said those words, city workers a few blocks away uprooted an enormous statue of Robert E. Lee – the last of four Confederate monuments the mayor removed from the city after a years-long process. In a conversation with The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg, Landrieu discusses the politics of race in the south, his grappling with history as a white southerner, and his own family’s connection to the story of civil rights in America.
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    • 33 min.

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