1,331 episodes

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The Daily The New York Times

    • News
    • 4.6 • 582 Ratings

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    Redrawing the Map in New York

    Redrawing the Map in New York

    New York, like many other states, is enmeshed in the process of redrawing legislative districts.

    The outcome of the reconfiguring could be crucial in determining which party takes control of the House of Representatives next year.

    Clearly aware of the stakes, New York Democrats are considering a tactic that is usually a preserve of the Republican Party: gerrymandering.

    Guest: Nicholas Fandos, a political correspondent for The New York Times.

    • 22 min
    Submarines and Shifting Allegiances

    Submarines and Shifting Allegiances

    The recent U.S.-British deal to provide Australia with nuclear-powered submarines might look relatively inconsequential. But it signifies a close alliance between the three countries to face off against China.

    It is also notable for another reason: It has greatly angered the French. Why?

    Guest: Mark Landler, the London bureau chief for The New York Times.

    • 28 min
    A ‘Righteous Strike’

    A ‘Righteous Strike’

    When he visited the site of an American drone strike in Kabul, Matthieu Aikins, a Times journalist, knew something wasn’t adding up. He uncovered a story that was quite different from the one offered up by the United States military.

    We follow The Times’s investigation and how it forced the military to acknowledge that the drone attack was a mistake.

    Guest: Matthieu Aikins, a writer based in Afghanistan for The New York Times.

    • 28 min
    One Family’s Fight Against the Dixie Fire

    One Family’s Fight Against the Dixie Fire

    Annie Correal, a reporter for The Times, has family in Indian Valley, in Northern California, roots which extend back to the 1950s.

    This summer, as wildfires closed in on the area, she reported from her family’s property as they sought to fend off the flames — and investigated the divided opinions about what had caused the devastating blazes.

    Guest: Annie Correal, a reporter covering New York City for The New York Times.

    • 31 min
    The Sunday Read: ‘The Composer at the Frontier of Movie Music’

    The Sunday Read: ‘The Composer at the Frontier of Movie Music’

    You have almost certainly heard Nicholas Britell’s music, even if you don’t know his name. More than any other contemporary composer, he appears to have the whole of music history at his command, shifting easily between vocabularies, often in the same film.

    His most arresting scores tend to fuse both ends of his musical education. “Succession” is 18th-century court music married to heart-pounding beats; “Moonlight” chops and screws a classical piano-and-violin duet as if it’s a Three 6 Mafia track.

    Britell’s C.V. reads like the setup for a comedy flick: a Harvard-educated, world-class pianist who studied psychology and once played in a moderately successful hip-hop band, who wound up managing portfolios on Wall Street.

    That is until he started scoring movies, and quickly acquired Academy Award nominations.

    “What I’ve found in the past,” said Jon Burlingame, a film-music historian, “is that people have found it impossible to incorporate such modern musical forms as hip-hop into dramatic underscore for films. When Nick did it in ‘Moonlight,’ I was frankly stunned. I didn’t think it was possible.”

    • 40 min
    A Broadway Show Comes Back to Life

    A Broadway Show Comes Back to Life

    This episode contains strong language.

    “Six,” a revisionist feminist British pop musical about the wives of King Henry VIII, was shaping up to be a substantial hit on Broadway after finding success in London.

    On its opening night, however, in March 2020, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced a shutdown of theater that would wind up lasting a year and a half.

    We speak to the cast and crew of “Six” about the show’s path back to the stage and explore what it tells us about the trials of Broadway during the pandemic.

    Guest: Michael Paulson, a theater reporter for The New York Times.

    • 31 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
582 Ratings

582 Ratings

Alex_TheWolf28 ,

Like the content stop the vocal fry

Had to stop listening a couple of times because of the extreme vocalfry of the female narrator or interviewer. Stop it, use your beautiful normal voice you are fine as you are. Stop the fry.

Manfred kundschaft ,

Such a great podcast

Every time i came across a hard topic i wish for Michael to explain it to me. Its such a good podcast. Very insight-full.
Ow and PS. Don't let the people get to your head that are whining that you pause. Every now and then. In a sentence. Its funny and just the way you talk. Keept it up!

SmthSmth15345 ,

Brilliant, informative, inspiring

As a European with a deep curiosity for political issues concerning America and the rest of the world, The Daily has become a new obsession. It’s incredibly factual, analytical, and unbiased (although certainly from a liberal perspective). It covers topics that no major news outlet wants to discuss, including America’s troubled history with racism.

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