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Artist Rebecca Crowell shares experiences and thoughts from three decades of painting, teaching and traveling, as well as her conversations with other artists. She is joined by her co-host, producer, and son, Ross Ticknor, who brings an entrepreneurial Millennial perspective. The conversations are broad and eclectic, focused on ideas, information and anecdotes that other artists may find helpful in their work and careers. A new episode is uploaded every weekend!

The Messy Studio with Rebecca Crowel‪l‬ Rebecca Crowell

    • Kunst
    • 5.0 • 1 beoordeling

Artist Rebecca Crowell shares experiences and thoughts from three decades of painting, teaching and traveling, as well as her conversations with other artists. She is joined by her co-host, producer, and son, Ross Ticknor, who brings an entrepreneurial Millennial perspective. The conversations are broad and eclectic, focused on ideas, information and anecdotes that other artists may find helpful in their work and careers. A new episode is uploaded every weekend!

    Keeping Records: The Stress and Mess

    Keeping Records: The Stress and Mess

    There probably are a lot of artists who are able to keep accurate, up to date records of their inventory, sales, expenses, materials, and contacts. They have systems that are efficient and neat, and any information they need about their art careers can be easily retrieved from a file. Then there are those who fail miserably at organization, and whose records--if they exist--are in total confusion. A question about the location of a certain painting, or the need to put together images of work for a presentation is cause for panic. Are you somewhere in between these extremes, or do you identify with one or the other? Today we take an honest look at the challenges of recordkeeping for artists.


    Rebecca and Ross fully admit that their own record-keeping needs improvement and offer a few tips along with recognizing their downfalls. The first step is noting what is not working. Where the cracks appear is where data can, and probably will, fall through. This can include failing to note the details of sales or when a work of art is moved between galleries, not taking or filing photos for each piece of art, and allowing confusion in terms of titles or the fact that certain works have been purposefully destroyed or worked over.


    Messy records create more and more issues as time goes on. Once an area of record-keeping has been neglected, it becomes harder to know where to start with bringing everything up to date, and the project of going back into old records to organize them correctly can seem enormous.


    To approach your own record-keeping, recognize what does work for you and be open to new systems that may be easier to maintain that what you've been using. You can certainly have a satisfying and productive art career with a few holes in it, but if you can avoid this stress, it’s a good idea. We hope this episode will inspire those of you who have the need to organize—and those of you who are on top of it all to feel very good about that!




    Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here.

    Thank you also to everyone who has written testimonials for Ross's website! Have you enjoyed the audio production quality and hearing Ross's voice? Submit a testimonial by email at rticknor.core@gmail.com or by submitting the contact form at www.messystudiopodcast.com!

    When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies.


    www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick

    It's time for an update on the latest news from Cold Wax Academy! Rebecca and her partner Jerry Mclaughlin are now well into their second quarter of weekly Live sessions for their members, in which they explore 3 main topics in deep, interrelated, and engaging ways. This quarter, those topics are Texture, Layering, and Writing and Talking about your Work. Weekly sessions include discussion, slide presentations, videos, critiques, special guests, and the opportunty to ask questions during the session. Cold Wax Academy Members have access to all past sessions, which are recorded each week--so if you're hesitating to join mid-quarter, no worries about missing out. There is plenty for you to explore, and you can watch previous sessions on your own schedule. Jerry and Rebecca offer for a trial month at the Core level for only $29.99. Visit www.coldwaxacademy.com and
    and click on the Memberships button.

    Have an art related product, service, or event you would like to advertise on the Messy Studio Podcast?
    Email Ross at rticknor.core@gmail.com for current mid-roll advertising rates.

    F

    • 31 min.
    Building A Connection

    Building A Connection

    Creating art is a way to share our thoughts, the ways we see the world, and experience life. This communication is vital-- even when we’re immersed in our process, thinking only of the next step ahead--our unseen, largely unknown audience is with us. Very few artists work in total isolation, with no desire to connect or communicate with viewers. Yet artists are also encouraged to follow their own vision, to not let other people’s reactions pull them off track. Today we’ll toss around some thoughts about the desire to connect with our viewers, and what this means in the studio.


    The artists personal connection to the work, and in making the work is important in communicating to the viewer a sense of humanity, that their experiences and ideas connect with someone else’s, and that there is mutual validation in both artist and viewer when the connection is made.


    From the artist’s perspective, the primary impetus for making art may be self-expression rather than communication with others, but as soon as the work is out in public, the viewer’s responses complete the cycle of communication. Most of us feel deep satisfaction in knowing someone appreciates and understands our work.


    For the viewer, connection is vital. If no way of understanding the work is evident, even in an intuitive way, impatience and frustration often set in quickly. Ambiguity and multiple interpretations are fine but there still needs to be some basic structure or purpose sensed in the work. Without that, ambiguity is just muddle.


    When an artist has clarity and purpose, the viewer senses this and can enter the work as in a conversation or in appreciation of a story. It’s the job of the artist to create this conversation and invite the viewer to participate.




    Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here.

    Thank you also to everyone who has written testimonials for Ross's website! Have you enjoyed the audio production quality and hearing Ross's voice? Submit a testimonial by email at rticknor.core@gmail.com or by submitting the contact form at www.messystudiopodcast.com!

    When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies.


    www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick

    It's time for an update on the latest news from Cold Wax Academy! Rebecca and her partner Jerry Mclaughlin are now well into their second quarter of weekly Live sessions for their members, in which they explore 3 main topics in deep, interrelated, and engaging ways. This quarter, those topics are Texture, Layering, and Writing and Talking about your Work. Weekly sessions include discussion, slide presentations, videos, critiques, special guests, and the opportunty to ask questions during the session. Cold Wax Academy Members have access to all past sessions, which are recorded each week--so if you're hesitating to join mid-quarter, no worries about missing out. There is plenty for you to explore, and you can watch previous sessions on your own schedule. Jerry and Rebecca offer for a trial month at the Core level for only $29.99. Visit www.coldwaxacademy.com and
    and click on the Memberships button.

    Have an art related product, service, or event you would like to advertise on the Messy Studio Podcast?
    Email Ross at rticknor.core@gmail.com for current mid-roll advertising rates.

    For more from The Messy Studio:
    www.messystudiopodcast.com
    www.facebook.com/messystudiopodcast

    For more from Rebecca Crowell:
    www.rebeccacrowell.com
    www.coldwaxacademy.com

    The Messy Studio Podca

    • 31 min.
    Challenges and Risks

    Challenges and Risks

    As artists, we are often presented with situations that ask us to say “yes” to something that feels challenging or risky. This could be as small as the need to rework a painting to as large as agreeing to a major solo exhibit. Accepting any challenge requires a commitment and it may feel stressful and bring on self-doubt. Yet successful artists always take some risks that lead to growth and new possibilities—in their careers and in the studio. Today Rebecca and her partner at Cold Wax Academy, Jerry McLaughlin, talk about why it is important to take on challenges and risks in your art practice--along with a few stories about their own related experiences.


    Rebecca and Jerry recorded this episode on video as well as audio, so if you'd like to see the video version, please visit the Messy Studio Facebook page or the Cold wax Academy Facebook page. That’s www.facebook.com/messystudiopodcast or www.facebook.com/coldwaxacademyIn .Here's the Youtube link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3q5Cq7ZI3xI


    As much as we may hesitate to step away from what is known and comfortable, risks and challenges offer advancement and growth that are vital to growing your work and art business. Of course, we need to be discerning, to consider what is realistic, or whether there is anything about the idea that doesn’t seem legit or too much of a distraction. But too often we hesitate to take opportunities that really will be beneficial because we consider them too risky.


    A good question is, what exactly are you risking? Often the dangers are larger in your imagination than something that might actually happen. The gains are very often much larger than any risk involved.


    Making a commitment to follow through on a challenge that offers promise is actually quite freeing. You gain a sense of purpose and focus that moves you forward in every aspect of your practice.




    Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here.

    Thank you also to everyone who has written testimonials for Ross's website! Have you enjoyed the audio production quality and hearing Ross's voice? Submit a testimonial by email at rticknor.core@gmail.com or by submitting the contact form at www.messystudiopodcast.com!

    When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies.


    www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick

    It's time for an update on the latest news from Cold Wax Academy! Rebecca and her partner Jerry Mclaughlin are now well into their second quarter of weekly Live sessions for their members, in which they explore 3 main topics in deep, interrelated, and engaging ways. This quarter, those topics are Texture, Layering, and Writing and Talking about your Work. Weekly sessions include discussion, slide presentations, videos, critiques, special guests, and the opportunty to ask questions during the session. Cold Wax Academy Members have access to all past sessions, which are recorded each week--so if you're hesitating to join mid-quarter, no worries about missing out. There is plenty for you to explore, and you can watch previous sessions on your own schedule. Jerry and Rebecca offer for a trial month at the Core level for only $29.99. Visit www.coldwaxacademy.com and
    and click on the Memberships button.

    Have an art related product, service, or event you would like to advertise on the Messy Studio Podcast?
    Email Ross at rticknor.core@gmail.com for current mid-roll advertising rates.

    For more from The Messy Studio:
    www.messystudiopodcast.com
    www.facebook.com/messystudiopo

    • 36 min.
    Finding Downtime

    Finding Downtime

    As much as we may appreciate living an entrepreneurial lifestyle, juggling its many demands can be exhausting and challenging. Artists who are also involved in the business of art can easily feel scattered and stressed by all the tasks needed to stay productive and on track. But one of the most challenging demands may be stepping away from all of that on a regular basis. Today we will toss around some ideas for the type-A personalities among us who find it hard to relax.


    As self-employed people, we can easily feel that we need to work all the time. Having high goals and aspirations, the drive for income, and knowing our responsibilities to other people all can lead us to ignore the need for down time. And of course, we also love what we do so that turning to our work rather than to something more relaxing is natural.


    But the feelings of pressure can overwhelm us. A helpful approach is to distinguish between demands that come at you from the outside, and which demands we place on ourselves. Recognizing the difference can help you sort out how to deal with finding a better balance to work and down time. Pressures that come from outside us in the form of requests and commitments from others need to be carefully considered along with a realistic evaluation of your time. Pressure that we place on ourselves from within can challenge us to think about perfectionism, fear of failure, land ack of confidence.


    Given the many aspects of managing an art career, how can you find ways to open up your time to include more leisure? Consider what can you delegate, what can you let go of instead of demanding perfection? Can you be more realistic about managing your time? What about taking days off just as you would at paid employment? Or scheduling a day a week just for your art, so that you get your studio time in and can perhaps then relax about fitting it in every day?


    Taking down time may not come naturally to you at all. Some of us have to sternly demand of ourselves that we to take time off. We’re so good at all the other demands but the one that asks us to just “be” seems almost impossible. We may resist it and call it a waste of time. But it’s actually very important to live a balanced life, enjoy some down time, and trust that we will retain our ambition and sense of purpose even as we step away sometimes from the demands of our lives.




    Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here.

    Thank you also to everyone who has written testimonials for Ross's website! Have you enjoyed the audio production quality and hearing Ross's voice? Submit a testimonial by email at rticknor.core@gmail.com or by submitting the contact form at www.messystudiopodcast.com!

    When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies.


    www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick

    It's time for an update on the latest news from Cold Wax Academy! Rebecca and her partner Jerry Mclaughlin are now well into their second quarter of weekly Live sessions for their members, in which they explore 3 main topics in deep, interrelated, and engaging ways. This quarter, those topics are Texture, Layering, and Writing and Talking about your Work. Weekly sessions include discussion, slide presentations, videos, critiques, special guests, and the opportunty to ask questions during the session. Cold Wax Academy Members have access to all past sessions, which are recorded each week--so if you're hesitating to join mid-quarter, no worries about missing out. There is plenty for you to

    • 41 min.
    Overworking It

    Overworking It

    Artists are often cautioned not to overwork their pieces, especially when the medium is drawing or painting. This advice is meant to prevent work that is too fussy or refined, or otherwise lacking energy. But many artists place importance on fine-tuning their work, and on paying close attention to detail. The art-world advice against overworking may not apply to everyone’s approach. Today we’ll take a closer look at how this advice can sometimes get in the way of creating your best work.


    Often instructors and other artists will tell someone, “don’t touch it, it’s done.” In other words, “don’t overwork it.” This is usually said with all good intentions, but it takes away the artist’s decision about whether to keep going. If we don’t test the boundaries of what is done, we don’t discover new territory or learn to control the medium.


    There are art media that need to be used in a deliberate, direct way, start to finish, with no reworking. Or you may simply want your work to be very gestural or fresh, in which case you do need to be concerned about an overworked surface. But overworking often hovers as a caution even with media that can easily be reworked and changed as part of the process.


    Whether avoidance of overworking applies to you or not depends not only on your medium and style but your personality as well. It may suit you work patiently on a detailed or subtle painting for a long time as you refine and edit. This doesn’t mean you’re too perfectionistic or picky, it’s simply your own approach.


    Overworking is one more art term that is used frequently without much explanation—it’s based on assumptions that may or may not be true for your own preferences and way of working. I hope that today we’ve gotten you to question whether this term means anything at all to you, and if it does, how you would define it in your own way.




    Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here.

    Thank you also to everyone who has written testimonials for Ross's website! Have you enjoyed the audio production quality and hearing Ross's voice? Submit a testimonial by email at rticknor.core@gmail.com or by submitting the contact form at www.messystudiopodcast.com!

    When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies.


    www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick

    It's time for an update on the latest news from Cold Wax Academy! Rebecca and her partner Jerry Mclaughlin are now well into their second quarter of weekly Live sessions for their members, in which they explore 3 main topics in deep, interrelated, and engaging ways. This quarter, those topics are Texture, Layering, and Writing and Talking about your Work. Weekly sessions include discussion, slide presentations, videos, critiques, special guests, and the opportunty to ask questions during the session. Cold Wax Academy Members have access to all past sessions, which are recorded each week--so if you're hesitating to join mid-quarter, no worries about missing out. There is plenty for you to explore, and you can watch previous sessions on your own schedule. Jerry and Rebecca offer for a trial month at the Core level for only $29.99. Visit www.coldwaxacademy.com and
    and click on the Memberships button.

    Have an art related product, service, or event you would like to advertise on the Messy Studio Podcast?
    Email Ross at rticknor.core@gmail.com for current mid-roll advertising rates.

    For more from The Messy Studio:
    www.messystudiopodcast.com
    www.facebook.co

    • 29 min.
    Your Body Of Work

    Your Body Of Work

    As artists, we need ways to organize our work in our minds, on our websites or in our presentations. Where do logical connections exist and how can grouping certain pieces together aid in understanding them? Thinking of your output as “bodies of work” is a useful approach. But this is also one of those vague art terms that means different things to different people. What constitutes a body of work? How many pieces does it include? Is it the same as a series? Today we’ll be examining this term in the hopes of providing some insight into how it applies to your own work.


    One way to think of a body of work is simply as a group of work that is cohesive or consistent in some way. There is some uniting factor, but the range of what that might be is wide. The term tends to be a broader or more open-ended term than the term, series. Bodies of work tend to evolve organically rather than being planned out with set parameters, as many series are. The term might be applied to all of an artist’s work in a particular medium, or done on an artist residency, or that explores a particular subject matter. A body of work can even mean the work done in an artist’s entire lifetime of creating.
    .
    For your own purposes, perhaps the easiest approach is to use the term “body of work” as a way of organizing and grouping what you create. It is a flexible term that can meet your own needs when designing a website, choosing work for an exhibit, or talking about your development as an artist in a talk or other presentation. Looking back at various bodies of work you have created can also give you a helpful sense of achievement and continuity in your art practice.




    Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! Special thanks to Wendy Catlin for her donation via PayPal. If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here.

    Thank you also to everyone who has written testimonials for Ross's website! Have you enjoyed the audio production quality and hearing Ross's voice? Submit a testimonial by email at rticknor.core@gmail.com or by submitting the contact form at www.messystudiopodcast.com!

    When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies.


    www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick

    It's time for an update on the latest news from Cold Wax Academy! Rebecca and her partner Jerry Mclaughlin are now well into their second quarter of weekly Live sessions for their members, in which they explore 3 main topics in deep, interrelated, and engaging ways. This quarter, those topics are Texture, Layering, and Writing and Talking about your Work. Weekly sessions include discussion, slide presentations, videos, critiques, special guests, and the opportunty to ask questions during the session. Cold Wax Academy Members have access to all past sessions, which are recorded each week--so if you're hesitating to join mid-quarter, no worries about missing out. There is plenty for you to explore, and you can watch previous sessions on your own schedule. Jerry and Rebecca offer for a trial month at the Core level for only $29.99. Visit www.coldwaxacademy.com and
    and click on the Memberships button.

    Have an art related product, service, or event you would like to advertise on the Messy Studio Podcast?
    Email Ross at rticknor.core@gmail.com for current mid-roll advertising rates.

    For more from The Messy Studio:
    www.messystudiopodcast.com
    www.facebook.com/messystudiopodcast

    For more from Rebecca Crowell:
    www.rebeccacrowell.com
    www.coldwaxacademy.com

    The Messy Studio Podcast is a CORE Publication MGMT produ

    • 34 min.

Klantrecensies

5.0 van 5
1 beoordeling

1 beoordeling

Pat Fros ,

So inspiring, honest and helpful

Hi Rebecca and Ross, for a long time I wanted to let you know how much I enjoy your podcast! For me your podcast is so helpful! It makes you think and do some self reflection and I get new ideas how to look at certain issues. Thank you so much for enlighten me! Usually I listen on Sunday while starting up in my studio. Greetings, Pat Fros

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