22 episodes

Fact or fiction? There are endless competing claims in the health and wellness space, and it can be hard to tell what’s the truth.. and what’s just got a shiny filter on it.

To get the skinny on weight loss, hear from Dr Nick Fuller, a leading obesity and weight loss expert from the University of Sydney as he sorts through scientific papers and studies and breaks it down for you in 10 minute episodes.

Hear from Dr Nick on topics like:
Are carbs at night going to cause weight gain?
What supplements work best for weight loss?
Is it okay to have full fat dairy?

https://intervalweightloss.com/

9 Minutes to Better Health with Dr Nick Fuller 9 Minutes to Better Health

    • Health & Fitness

Fact or fiction? There are endless competing claims in the health and wellness space, and it can be hard to tell what’s the truth.. and what’s just got a shiny filter on it.

To get the skinny on weight loss, hear from Dr Nick Fuller, a leading obesity and weight loss expert from the University of Sydney as he sorts through scientific papers and studies and breaks it down for you in 10 minute episodes.

Hear from Dr Nick on topics like:
Are carbs at night going to cause weight gain?
What supplements work best for weight loss?
Is it okay to have full fat dairy?

https://intervalweightloss.com/

    9 Minutes to Better Health - Season 2 Teaser

    9 Minutes to Better Health - Season 2 Teaser

    That’s a wrap on season 1. Thank you everyone for listening to the show. Stay tuned for season 2 coming soon!

    For more help on your health and weight loss journey, check out the IWL award-winning program found here: https://intervalweightloss.com/

    For advice on what to eat and how to eat throughout the day, check out this 1-minute video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ru_YiyHTRPA

    For resistance training circuits you can do in the comfort of your own home, check out these 30-minute workouts here:  https://youtu.be/n9qYzjLY9G4

    For better sleep, follow these simple tips: https://youtu.be/JPRIzMUhPMo

    ---------------

    Dr Nick Fuller is a Leading Obesity Expert at the University of Sydney and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, and the founder of the IWL program: https://www.sydney.edu.au/medicine-health/about/our-people/academic-staff/nick-fuller

    He holds the following qualifications:

    Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Obesity Treatment - The University of Sydney

    Bachelors Degree, Human Movement & Sports Science - University of Technology, Sydney

    Masters Degree, Nutrition & Dietetics - The University of Sydney

    • 55 sec
    How do you prevent comfort eating and overcome the addiction to food?

    How do you prevent comfort eating and overcome the addiction to food?

    What we eat and how we eat is a large part of the obesity problem and the growing waistlines we see today. It’s very hard to resist the foods we love and there are very good reasons as to why. First, there’s the food manufacturers themselves that have an uncanny ability to create food that smells, tastes, and looks delicious. But it’s not just the crafty work of the food manufacturers, we also have our ancestors to thank. As hunter gatherers we evolved to seek out high energy, nutrient dense foods, which gave us best bang for our buck. Food wasn’t always available, and it was hard to come by, so we gouged when it was available. Fast forward to today’s environment - our genes haven’t changed but our food environment has. The added fat, salt and sugars in these processed foods trigger addictive-like eating behaviours.

    How do you prevent the cravings? And how do you prevent the associated weight gain that comes with your favourite foods? Join Dr Nick as he takes you on a deep dive into the studies to find out.

    Relevant studies and resources can be found here:

    https://intervalweightloss.com/articles/top-7-tips-for-preventing-comfort-eating-during-covid-19

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0149763414002140

    For more help on your health and weight loss journey, check out the IWL award-winning program found here: https://intervalweightloss.com/

    For advice on what to eat and how to eat throughout the day, check out this 1-minute video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ru_YiyHTRPA

    For resistance training circuits you can do in the comfort of your own home, check out these 30-minute workouts here:  https://youtu.be/n9qYzjLY9G4

    For better sleep, follow these simple tips: https://youtu.be/JPRIzMUhPMo

    ---------------

    Dr Nick Fuller is a Leading Obesity Expert at the University of Sydney and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, and the founder of the IWL program: https://www.sydney.edu.au/medicine-health/about/our-people/academic-staff/nick-fuller

    He holds the following qualifications:

    Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Obesity Treatment - The University of Sydney

    Bachelors Degree, Human Movement & Sports Science - University of Technology, Sydney

    Masters Degree, Nutrition & Dietetics - The University of Sydney

    • 8 min
    Is going gluten-free a good idea?

    Is going gluten-free a good idea?

    Coeliac disease is an auto-immune disorder triggered by the consumption of gluten; a protein found in wheat, rye and barley, to give products such as bread their elasticity and texture. When people with coeliac disease eat gluten, they damage their small intestine and can’t absorb nutrients from food. They end up with unpleasant side effects such as itchy skin, heartburn, diarrhoea, bloating and constipation.

    Despite the increase in gluten-free products in shops and people avoiding it, the disease only affects 1 per cent of the population.

    Gluten is unsafe for those with coeliac disease BUT is it an issue for the rest of the population? Is going gluten-free a good idea? Join Dr Nick as he takes you on a deep dive into the studies to find out.

    Relevant studies and resources can be found here:

    https://www.nature.com/articles/nrgastro.2015.156

    https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/10/12/1881

    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10620-019-05663-x

    https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition/article/how-healthy-is-a-glutenfree-diet/DE9A4889269A4288E36376510075A0BC

    For more help on your health and weight loss journey, check out the IWL award-winning program found here: https://intervalweightloss.com/

    For advice on what to eat and how to eat throughout the day, check out this 1-minute video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ru_YiyHTRPA

    For resistance training circuits you can do in the comfort of your own home, check out these 30-minute workouts here:  https://youtu.be/n9qYzjLY9G4

    For better sleep, follow these simple tips: https://youtu.be/JPRIzMUhPMo

    ---------------

    Dr Nick Fuller is a Leading Obesity Expert at the University of Sydney and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, and the founder of the IWL program: https://www.sydney.edu.au/medicine-health/about/our-people/academic-staff/nick-fuller

    He holds the following qualifications:

    Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Obesity Treatment - The University of Sydney

    Bachelors Degree, Human Movement & Sports Science - University of Technology, Sydney

    Masters Degree, Nutrition & Dietetics - The University of Sydney

    • 7 min
    If you’re making the switch to a vegan diet, what do you need to be mindful of?

    If you’re making the switch to a vegan diet, what do you need to be mindful of?

    More people than ever are turning to a vegan diet for a vast variety of reasons – these include ethical, cultural and health reasons. A vegan diet is a type of vegetarian diet that means abstaining from all animal products. This means no meat, poultry or fish. It also means no by-products such as eggs and dairy products. Basically, you’re left to eating fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds and legumes, which can make it quite challenging to meet your nutritional requirements for a variety of vitamins and minerals.

    The research identifies six nutritional alarms when turning vegan. Join Dr Nick as he takes you on a deep dive into the studies to find out.

    Relevant studies and resources can be found here:

    https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/pdf/10.1146/annurev.nu.11.070191.000425

    https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1467-3010.2005.00467.x

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10408398.2022.2107997

    For more help on your health and weight loss journey, check out the IWL award-winning program found here: https://intervalweightloss.com/

    For advice on what to eat and how to eat throughout the day, check out this 1-minute video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ru_YiyHTRPA

    For resistance training circuits you can do in the comfort of your own home, check out these 30-minute workouts here:  https://youtu.be/n9qYzjLY9G4

    For better sleep, follow these simple tips: https://youtu.be/JPRIzMUhPMo

    ---------------

    Dr Nick Fuller is a Leading Obesity Expert at the University of Sydney and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, and the founder of the IWL program: https://www.sydney.edu.au/medicine-health/about/our-people/academic-staff/nick-fuller

    He holds the following qualifications:

    Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Obesity Treatment - The University of Sydney

    Bachelors Degree, Human Movement & Sports Science - University of Technology, Sydney

    Masters Degree, Nutrition & Dietetics - The University of Sydney

    • 7 min
    How do you deal with fussy eaters?

    How do you deal with fussy eaters?

    Fussy eating is very common in young children and peaks around the age of 3. Fussy, picky, selective, or choosy eating refers to an unwillingness to eat familiar or new foods, and a lack of diet variety – typically less than 20 different foods in your child’s diet.

    This can be a huge stress for parents because if the fussiness persists, it can lead to poor growth and development, nutrient deficiencies, and constipation. Plus it’s really annoying.  

    The literature shows that almost half of all children will go through a fussy eating period and it’s a normal stage of development. Most kids are selective eaters. And if you think about it, it makes perfect sense, because it’s this food “fussiness” that ensured the survival of our ancestors, thousands of years ago. We sought out foods high in sugar and fat as these foods gave us best bang for our buck during times of food scarcity. And we rejected unfamiliar foods and bitter flavours - such as vegetables - to avoid ingestion of potential toxins.

    Over time, our genes haven’t changed, but the food environment has. Now we’re spoilt for choice – you can find your favourite foods on every block and our kids scream out for the stuff. But as the studies show, while the genes that determine food fussiness have been passed on from our ancestors, it’s not our fate, and there’s some simple tips to deal with our kids unwillingness to eat new foods.

    Join Dr Nick as he takes you on a deep dive into the science to find out.

    Relevant studies and resources can be found here:

    https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2458-9-387

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195666307003716

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195666315003438

    https://www.jandonline.org/article/S2212-2672(15)00657-7/fulltext  

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031938416311015

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26055848/

    For more help on your health and weight loss journey, check out the IWL award-winning program found here: https://intervalweightloss.com/

    For advice on what to eat and how to eat throughout the day, check out this 1-minute video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ru_YiyHTRPA

    For resistance training circuits you can do in the comfort of your own home, check out these 30-minute workouts here:  https://youtu.be/n9qYzjLY9G4

    For better sleep, follow these simple tips: https://youtu.be/JPRIzMUhPMo

    ---------------

    Dr Nick Fuller is a Leading Obesity Expert at the University of Sydney and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, and the founder of the IWL program: https://www.sydney.edu.au/medicine-health/about/our-people/academic-staff/nick-fuller

    He holds the following qualifications:

    Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Obesity Treatment - The University of Sydney

    Bachelors Degree, Human Movement & Sports Science - University of Technology, Sydney

    Masters Degree, Nutrition & Dietetics - The University of Sydney

    • 7 min
    What can you do to speed up your metabolism?

    What can you do to speed up your metabolism?

    Metabolism is a term that describes all the chemical reactions in your body that keep your body alive and functioning. It’s most often used to describe your basal metabolic rate, or the number of calories you burn at rest.

    Think of your metabolism, like your car. If you fill your car with poor quality fuel or you let it run out of petrol, it will have no power and won't operate efficiently. The same can be said for your body. If you neglect it, it will be sluggish and you’ll burn less calories at rest. And this is not a favourable position to be in, as it makes it hard to manage your weight.

    Many factors can affect your metabolism including your sex, age, lifestyle and weight. And it definitely slows down as we get older. BUT, the good news is, there are things you can do to speed it up. Join Dr Nick as he takes you on a deep dive into the science to find out.

    Relevant studies and resources can be found here:

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26686003/

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27133622/

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33976376/

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31984610/

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7369170/

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30335479/

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6628169/

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21366839/  

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20142827/

    https://www.nature.com/articles/0803351

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1186/1550-2783-10-22

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2929498/

    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00125-020-05177-6

    For more help on your health and weight loss journey, check out the IWL award-winning program found here: https://intervalweightloss.com/

    For advice on what to eat and how to eat throughout the day, check out this 1-minute video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ru_YiyHTRPA

    For resistance training circuits you can do in the comfort of your own home, check out these 30-minute workouts here:  https://youtu.be/n9qYzjLY9G4

    For better sleep, follow these simple tips: https://youtu.be/JPRIzMUhPMo

    ---------------

    Dr Nick Fuller is a Leading Obesity Expert at the University of Sydney and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, and the founder of the IWL program: https://www.sydney.edu.au/medicine-health/about/our-people/academic-staff/nick-fuller

    He holds the following qualifications:

    Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Obesity Treatment - The University of Sydney

    Bachelors Degree, Human Movement & Sports Science - University of Technology, Sydney

    Masters Degree, Nutrition & Dietetics - The University of Sydney

    • 9 min

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