472 episodes

The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

Business Daily BBC Podcasts

    • Business
    • 4.8 • 39 Ratings

Listen on Apple Podcasts
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The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    Business Daily meets: Mariana Mazzucato

    Business Daily meets: Mariana Mazzucato

    The world's major consulting firms make an estimated trillion dollars a year, directing governments and businesses on how best to govern.
    But the economist Mariana Mazzucato argues that outsourcing the brain power of governments to private firms is a dangerous trend.
    Ed Butler asks her why she thinks it isn't money well spent.
    (Picture: Mariana Mazzucato. Credit: Getty Images)
    Presented and produced by Ed Butler

    • 18 min
    Is it okay to be mediocre at work?

    Is it okay to be mediocre at work?

    The idea of settling for ‘good enough’ and being mediocre at work is not new… but the case for prioritising other things apart from work has grown rapidly since the pandemic – and hashtags like #lazygirljob have been getting millions of views on TikTok.
    We find out what mediocrity means for staff and employers, and speak to workers who are embracing this new attitude.
    We hear from Jaime Ducharme, Time Magazine journalist who wrote an article about mediocrity in the workplace, Gabrielle Judge who started #lazygirljob on TikTok, and Dr Thomas Curran from the London School of Economics.
    Produced and presented by Clare Williamson
    (Image: A woman looking bored at work. Credit: Getty Images)

    • 18 min
    Would you like to work 'near' home?

    Would you like to work 'near' home?

    Work from home, or go into the office? For many businesses and workers it's an ongoing conversation at the moment.
    But could there be a third way - working 'near' home?
    New co-working spaces are providing a place for people to do their job close to where they live, but not at home which can be unsuitable and isolating.
    We also look at the WeWork model - the billion-dollar business filed for bankruptcy protection in the US last year - does that mean the concept isn't viable long term?
    Produced and presented by Dougal Shaw.
    (Image: A Patch co-working space in southern England. Credit: Benoit Grogan-Avignon)

    • 18 min
    Chile's move to a 40 hour work week

    Chile's move to a 40 hour work week

    We look at the implications as the Latin American country gradually reduces from 45 hours.
    In April 2023 politicians approved a law in congress saying that businesses need to move towards cutting their hours to help get a better work life balance for employees.
    This reduction is happening gradually, and the working week is getting shorter by at least one hour per year, over a maximum of five years.
    We speak to workers and businesses in Chile about the impact - good and bad - that this is having.
    Presenter: Jane Chambers
    Technical production: Matthew Dempsey
    (Image: A group of workers on lunchbreak in Santiago. Credit: Getty Images)

    • 18 min
    How Sweden led the way on parental leave

    How Sweden led the way on parental leave

    It's been 50 years since Sweden introduced state-funded parental leave, designed for couples to share.
    We hear how the pioneering policy has impacted families and businesses - and ask whether Sweden really deserves its reputation for gender equality.
    And we meet one of the first dads to take paid parental leave, back in the 1970s.
    Produced and presented by Maddy Savage
    (Image: A man holding a small child. Credit: Getty Images)

    • 18 min
    Business Daily meets: Ingrid Robeyns

    Business Daily meets: Ingrid Robeyns

    Today, the richest 10 per cent of the world’s population own more than three quarters of its wealth, while the bottom half have 2%.
    To halt the growing wealth gap, one economic philosopher, Ingrid Robeyns, has come up with a striking proposal - to impose legally enforced limits on people’s personal wealth. No one individual, Professor Robeyns suggests, should be allowed to have more than 10 million dollars.
    It's a provocative idea. And would it work in practice?
    (Picture: Ingrid Robeyns. Credit: Keke Keukelaar/United Agents)
    Presented and produced by Ed Butler

    • 18 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
39 Ratings

39 Ratings

Study876234 ,

My daily business newspaper

I don’t think any business interviews should be conducted at this point with questioning that suggests investors/shareholders are ONLY interested in the bottom line. That is simply not true. I am an investor/shareholder and I have no interest in making money at the expense of future generations. If you are to be current you simply cannot ignore this.

JamesBrownEnngineer ,

Biz Daily

Fantastic podcast for anyone interested in global markets, economics as well as business and entrepreneurship. Provides insight into market locations as well as personal interviews with those that work in or run business organisations. 5 stars

NZ_All_Black ,

Excellent

I listen everyday. It's topical, insightful, easy to 'disgest', and balanced. Well worth the time.

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