520 episodes

Leaders aren't born, they're made. This Monday show helps you discover leadership wisdom through insightful conversations. Independently produced weekly since 2011, Dr. Dave Stachowiak brings perspective from a thriving, global leadership academy, plus more than 15 years of leadership at Dale Carnegie. Bestselling authors, expert researchers, deep conversation, and regular dialogue with listeners have attracted 15 million downloads and the #1 search result for coaching on Apple Podcasts. Activate your FREE membership to search the entire episode library by topic at CoachingforLeaders.com

Coaching for Leaders Innovate Learning

    • Management
    • 4.4 • 20 Ratings

Leaders aren't born, they're made. This Monday show helps you discover leadership wisdom through insightful conversations. Independently produced weekly since 2011, Dr. Dave Stachowiak brings perspective from a thriving, global leadership academy, plus more than 15 years of leadership at Dale Carnegie. Bestselling authors, expert researchers, deep conversation, and regular dialogue with listeners have attracted 15 million downloads and the #1 search result for coaching on Apple Podcasts. Activate your FREE membership to search the entire episode library by topic at CoachingforLeaders.com

    Move From Advertising to Engagement, with Raja Rajamannar

    Move From Advertising to Engagement, with Raja Rajamannar

    Raja Rajamannar: Quantum Marketing

    Raja Rajamannar is Chief Marketing & Communications Officer for Mastercard, and president of the company’s healthcare business. He also serves as president of the World Federation of Advertisers. Raja has held C-level roles at firms ranging from Anthem to Humana, and has overseen the successful evolution of Mastercard’s identity for the digital age, from its Priceless experiential platforms to marketing-led business models.



    Raja’s work has been featured in Harvard Business School and Yale School of management case studies, and been taught at more than 40 top management schools around the world. He is the author of Quantum Marketing: Mastering the New Marketing Mindset for Tomorrow's Consumers*.



    In this conversation, Raja and I discuss the reality that traditional advertising as we know it is ending. He also invites us to rethink how we’ve traditionally thought about customer loyalty. Instead of telling stories about our brands, we should be doing the work to create stories along with our customers.

    Key Points



    Organizations need to engage in permission-based marketing to be credible to consumers.

    It’s helpful to think about relationships with consumers as affinity instead of loyalty.

    Most of what we call advertising today is interruptive to consumers and a poor experience. It’s not entirely dead, but certainly heading that way.

    Invite consumers into unique experiences by making the transition from storytelling to story making.

    Create experiences that are scalable and economically viable and sustainable.

    Smaller firms can seek out opportunities to create partnership that will help them make stories that are purposeful.



    Resources Mentioned



    Quantum Marketing: Mastering the New Marketing Mindset for Tomorrow's Consumers* by Raja Rajamannar



    Interview Notes

    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).

    Related Episodes



    How to Lead Top-Line Growth, with Tim Sanders (episode 299)

    Serve Others Through Marketing, with Seth Godin (episode 381)

    Where to Start on Subscriptions, with Robbie Kellman Baxter (episode 484)

    If You Build It, They Will Come (Dave’s Journal)



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    • 38 min
    How to Inspire More Curiosity, with Shannon Minifie

    How to Inspire More Curiosity, with Shannon Minifie

    Shannon Minifie: Box of Crayons

    Shannon is the CEO of Box of Crayons, the firm behind the best-selling books The Coaching Habit* and The Advice Trap*. Box of Crayons is a learning and development company that helps unleash the power of curiosity to create connected and engaged company cultures.



    Shannon followed an unusual path to becoming CEO of Box of Crayons. Her career began in academia, a pursuit driven by her desire to be a part of conversations she thinks are important. In 2016, she embarked on a new path, starting a career in corporate learning and development. She brings to her role more than a decade of experience in education and in practicing incisive investigation.



    In this conversation, Shannon and I talk about the word curiosity and the reality that not everybody thinks about that word the same way we do. We explore the distinction between troublemakers and changemakers and provide practical suggestions to inspire more curiosity inside your organization. Plus, we highlight many of the common barriers to utilizing curiosity well.

    Key Points



    Curiosity is a state, not a trait.

    Nobody says they are against curiosity. But the truth is that they’re suspicious of it.

    Four things tend to hold firms back from the benefits of changemaker curiosity:





    Complacency: being used to the status quo.

    Delusion: the belief that they are already good at it.

    Environment: espoused values vs. what’s being done in practice because of real barriers.

    The Advice Monster: too much a cultural reliance on advice-giving.



    Resources Mentioned



    Box of Crayons

    The Coaching Habit: Say Less, Ask More & Change the Way You Lead Forever* by Michael Bungay Stanier

    The Advice Trap: Be Humble, Stay Curious & Change the Way You Lead Forever* by Michael Bungay Stanier



    Related Episodes



    How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404)

    The Way to Be More Coach-Like, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 458)

    How to Build a Coaching Culture, with Andrea Wanerstrand (episode 501)



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    • 36 min
    Handle Papers Like a Pro, with David Sparks

    Handle Papers Like a Pro, with David Sparks

    David Sparks: MacSparky

    David Sparks speaks and writes about how to use technology to be more productive. David is a past speaker at Macworld / iWorld and a regular faculty member for the American Bar Association’s TechShow.



    David has published numerous books and videos on how to use technology including the MacSparky Field Guide series that includes videos and books on managing email, going paperless, and how to make a winning presentation. David is also co-host of the popular Mac Power Users, Automators, and Focused podcasts. When not speaking and writing about technology, he’s a business attorney in Orange County, California.



    David recently released his Paperless Field Guide*. In this conversation, David and I review the key steps to managing a paperless lifestyle including how to capture, process, edit, and share documents. We share useful hacks to find data in documents, track changes, annotate PDFs, and much more.

    Key Points



    The goal of the paperless lifestyle is to provide sanity so you’re not spending time and energy managing paperwork.

    Scanner Pro is David’s recommended app for most people who want to capture documents easily with optical character recognition (OCR).

    Getting your documents into PDF format will allow them to be accessible for the future and also protect you from trouble with future software versions.

    Decide on a personal syntax for how you name files. Including a noun, verb, and date can be useful to surface documents later.

    Use “track changes” on Microsoft Word or “suggesting” on Google Docs for collaboration, review, and editing.

    If you use a tablet and do lots of reading or document review, consider utilizing some of the newest features for annotation and markup.



    Resources Mentioned



    Paperless Field Guide* by David Sparks

    LinkedIn Learning is a useful starting point for foundational skills on major software programs like Microsoft Word

    Mac Power Users podcast



    Related Episodes



    How To Get Control Of Your Email, with David Sparks (episode 119)

    The Way to Stop Spinning Your Wheels on Planning (episode 319)

    Align Your Calendar to What Matters, with Nir Eyal (episode 431)



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    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    • 39 min
    The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel

    The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel

    Tom Henschel: The Look & Sound of Leadership

    Tom Henschel of Essential Communications grooms senior leaders and executive teams. An internationally recognized expert in the field of workplace communications and self-presentation, he has helped thousands of leaders achieve excellence through his work as an executive coach and his top-rated podcast, The Look & Sound of Leadership.



    In this episode Tom and I discuss the common challenge of both making sense to others and making sense of what others say to you. Tom invites us to follow a four step approach of sorting and labeling so that it’s easier for listening to follow our thinking. Finally, we explore some of the common missteps in communicating with more clarity.

    Key Points



    The why behind making sense: it’s better for both the sender and the receiver.

    There are four key parts to the structure of making sense to others:





    Create a headline

    Sort into folders

    Label each folder

    Transition with precision





    Tom shared an example of two different ways to communicate a message about presentation skills, one without sorting and labeling, and one with it.

    Common mistakes in making sense include the espoused number of items not matching the number of actual items, explaining the folders first before setting the stage, and not transitioning well.



    Resources Mentioned



    Sorting & Labeling by Tom Henschel (PDF download)

    Subscribe to Tom's updates



    Related Episodes



    Executive Presence with Your Elevator Speech, with Tom Henschel (episode 316)

    The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450)

    Your Leadership Motive, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 505)



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    • 38 min
    How to Define a Role, with Pat Griffin

    How to Define a Role, with Pat Griffin

    Pat Griffin: Dale Carnegie

    Pat has been actively engaged in helping organizations achieve greater success through the transformation of their people for almost two decades. He is a Dale Carnegie Master Trainer who helps organizations deliver measurable impact on strategic initiatives.



    Pat has extensive experience with manufacturing and engineering firms due to his previous career in those industries. He helps leaders zero in on process improvement and how the human side of that effort plays a significant role in its success or failure. Today he's Chief Relationship Officer at Dale Carnegie of Western New York.



    In this conversation, Pat and I discuss how managers can get alignment with employees about the key outcomes of their jobs. Pat invites us to create a Performance Results Description document, align with employees on the results, and then use it for tracking ongoing. Done well, this allows managers to influence better outcomes and provides more clarity for employees on where to place effort for results.

    Key Points



    Move past conversations about simply activities and towards conversations about outcomes.

    Documenting performance management helps create clarity for all parties on the results that are most critical.

    Managers and employees should work together to create a Performance Results Description (PRD) that captures the ideal results of the role.

    Within the PRD, Pat suggests that we identify 5-6 Key Result Areas (KRAs) and prioritize them. Example key result areas could be: quality control, new business development, cost analysis, customer evaluations, staffing, etc.

    Each Key Result Area (KRA) has at least one, and often more than one, performance standard. This is where specific metrics for outcomes can be tracked. An example is: “25% of sales revenue this year was generated from new customer accounts.”

    Use the performance



    Example section of a Performance Results Description (PRD):



    Key Result Area (KRA): Staffing



    Performance Standard #1: 25% of external applicants this year self-identify into an underrepresented group, as defined by our companies diversity and inclusion initiative.



    Performance Standard #2: Two thirds of open requisitions assigned this year are filled within 90 days of posting.



    Performance Standard #3: Recruiting events are scheduled with at least two universities this year where existing partnerships were not already in place.

    Resources Mentioned



    Dale Carnegie Friday workshop series



    Related Episodes



    Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370)

    Effective Delegation of Authority, with Hassan Osman (episode 413)

    How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464)



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    • 39 min
    How to Find Helpful Advisors, with Ethan Kross

    How to Find Helpful Advisors, with Ethan Kross

    Ethan Kross: Chatter

    Ethan Kross is one of the world’s leading experts on controlling the conscious mind. As an award-winning professor in the University of Michigan’s top-ranked Psychology Department and its Ross School of Business, he studies how the conversations people have with themselves impact their health, performance, decisions, and relationships.



    His research has been published in Science, The New England Journal of Medicine, and The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. He's been featured by Good Morning America, NPR’s Morning Edition, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, and many other publications. He's the author of Chatter: The Voice in Our Head, Why It Matters, and How to Harness It*.



    In this conversation, Ethan and I highlight how introspection can sometimes do more harm than good. Ethan invites us to form a board of advisors that support us with both our emotional and cognitive needs. Plus, he shares the science behind how we can do this effectively for others.

    Key Points



    Simply sharing our emotions with others doesn’t help us to recover in any meaningful way.

    When seeking out advisors, we should find those who support both our emotional needs as well as our cognitive ones. You want a blend of both Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock. 🖖

    Reflect on past conversations with advisors and determine if that previously helped you move forward with a challenging situation. That’s a key indicator to determine if they are people you want to keep engaging.

    Seek out different advisors for different things.

    A key distinction in supporting others is whether they have specifically sought out of advice or not. If not, being helpful people through invisible means is often useful.



    Resources Mentioned



    Chatter: The Voice in Our Head, Why It Matters, and How to Harness It* by Ethan Kross



    Interview Notes

    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).

    Related Episodes



    How to Know What You Don’t Know, with Art Markman (episode 437)

    The Way to Be More Coach-Like, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 458)

    Leadership Lies We Tell Ourselves, with Emily Leathers (episode 479)

    Making the Most of Mentoring (free membership required)



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    • 38 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
20 Ratings

20 Ratings

Gingerbeardedman ,

Practical and honest advice

There is a love sincerity to Dave. He delivers his insights without ego and jargon so the content shines through. Really enjoyable.

Penny Elliott ,

Infectious Positivity

Wow Dave Stachowiak your positivity is infectious! You make understanding the stories we tell ourselves so easy. I just had to give you a thumbs up after explaining the Spotlight effect. So interesting! Keep up this amazing podcast!

Sam L S ,

My essential leadership go to

Have been listening to Coaching for Leaders for 3 years now. It’s my essential go to if I’m stuck with a leadership topic. I also enjoy listening to this regularly as I find it very motivating.

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