138 episodes

Come dive into one of the curiously delightful conversations overheard at National Geographic’s headquarters, as we follow explorers, photographers, and scientists to the edges of our big, weird, beautiful world. Hosted by Peter Gwin and Amy Briggs.

Overheard at National Geographic National Geographic

    • Science
    • 4.9 • 28 Ratings

Come dive into one of the curiously delightful conversations overheard at National Geographic’s headquarters, as we follow explorers, photographers, and scientists to the edges of our big, weird, beautiful world. Hosted by Peter Gwin and Amy Briggs.

    Introducing: The Soul of Music

    Introducing: The Soul of Music

    National Geographic turns 135 in 2023. In February 2023, to celebrate exploration and commemorate Black History Month, National Geographic’s flagship podcast, Overheard, will feature musicians and National Geographic Explorers in conversation on music and exploration. This is just one of many celebrations planned for this milestone anniversary. 
    Hosted by Overheard producer Khari Douglas, these four episodes (every Tuesday in February) will feature world-famous musicians Rhiannon Giddens, Sampa the Great, Chief Xian aTunde Adjuah (formerly Christian Scott), and Meklit Hadero (also a Nat Geo explorer) in conversation with Nat Geo Explorers Alyea Pierce, Danielle Lee, Justin Dunnavant, and Jahawi Bertolli. The Explorers and artists will discuss how nature, history, and culture influence their work, what music inspires their adventures, and how they address some of the world’s most pressing and complicated issues through art and exploration. 
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    • 1 min
    Unfolding the Future of Origami

    Unfolding the Future of Origami

    The future is bright for origami, the centuries-old art of paper folding. In recent decades, scientists, engineers, and designers have pushed origami beyond its traditional roots and applied its patterns to fascinating technologies like foldable kayaks and tiny robots that can fit into a pill capsule. We’ll fold cranes with National Geographic writer Maya Wei-Haas, who will share the latest advancements with origami and what the future holds for this art form in science.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.
    Want more?
    We’ve just touched the surface of origami science. To go deeper, read Maya’s story in the February issue of National Geographic magazine. She talks about more applications of origami, including origami in space. 
    Did you know that origami could be the key to making better face masks? Origami’s unique folds may be able to make face masks fit better. Check out our article exploring this possibility. 
    Also explore
    Plus, grab some origami and head to the ocean. Origami folds could be the key to perfecting a super delicate robot that can catch deep-sea animals, study them, and release them unharmed.
    If you like what you hear and you want to support more content like this, please rate and review us in your podcast app and consider a National Geographic subscription. Go to natgeo.com/exploremore to subscribe today.
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    • 26 min
    What Happens After You Uncover Buried History?

    What Happens After You Uncover Buried History?

    The 1619 Project was a New York Times Magazine endeavor that explored the ways the legacy of slavery still shapes American society. The story exploded into cultural consciousness in 2019, and has since become a book, a podcast, and now, a documentary series. For the project’s creators, that meant great success, but it also meant facing pushback and surprises. We talk to journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones about how politics affected The 1619 Project and what it means to be in the middle of this social reckoning.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.
    Want more?
    The 1619 Project documentary examines how the legacy of slavery has influenced music, capitalism, and democracy itself. It premieres January 26 on Hulu. 
    Also explore:
    Take a look at the original New York Times Magazine 1619 Project. It features articles, photo essays, and more that discuss how black Americans created democracy in the country, how segregation leads to traffic jams, and more.
    Check out the audio series that The New York Times produced. It explores topics like Black land ownership and health disparities. 
    National Geographic also has extensive coverage of these issues, including the long and complicated legacy of Black landownership in the U.S., COVID's disproportionate death toll, and how Black Americans see racism infecting the U.S. health-care system.
    If you like what you hear and you want to support more content like this, please rate and review us in your podcast app and consider a National Geographic subscription. Go to natgeo.com/exploremore to subscribe today.
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    • 29 min
    The People and Tech That Power Nat Geo

    The People and Tech That Power Nat Geo

    Cameras that drop miles beneath the ocean surface. Handmade art that reveals the secrets of archeological sites and extinct animals. For 135 years, National Geographic has pioneered new ways of exploring and illuminating our world—and now you can meet a few of the people who make it possible. Join Nathan Lump, National Geographic’s editor in chief, and Jill Tiefenthaler, CEO of the National Geographic Society, for a tour of the cutting-edge Exploration Technology Lab and a look inside the studio where original, scientifically accurate art comes to life. Then, play along with a fun trivia game based on sounds from the National Geographic Soundbank recorded by explorers around the world.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.
    Want more?
    Learn more about the people in this episode, including editor in chief Nathan Lump, National Geographic Society CEO Jill Tiefenthaler, and senior graphics editor Fernando Baptista. 
    See how the National Geographic Exploration Technology Lab is illuminating Earth’s largest, yet least explored habitat: the deep ocean.
    Also explore:
    Want to hear more about how Nat Geo creates all-new tech for Explorers and photographers? Meet photo engineer Tom O’Brien, the real-life MacGyver in Nat Geo’s basement, in a previous episode of Overheard.
    See the first issue of National Geographic from 1888, which cost 50 cents and had zero photographs—those wouldn’t appear for another 17 years.
    If you like what you hear and want to support more content like this, please consider a National Geographic subscription. Go to natgeo.com/exploremore to subscribe today.
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    • 33 min
    Meet an Imagineer Who Built a Wish

    Meet an Imagineer Who Built a Wish

    Last summer, Disney Cruise Line released its fifth and most technologically advanced cruise ship yet: Disney Wish. We’ll meet Laura Cabo, a creative executive at Walt Disney Imagineering, who shares the excitement and challenges in designing a cruise ship that’s nearly as long as the Eiffel Tower, and how Imagineers turn visions into reality.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.
    Want more?
    The documentary Chad made with Laura and other Disney Imagineers is called Making the Wish: Disney’s Newest Cruise Ship. It will be available on Disney+ February 17. 
    And while you’re there, check out the documentary series The Imagineering Story about other Imagineers all over the world.
    If you like what you hear and want to support more content like this, please consider a National Geographic subscription. Go to natgeo.com/exploremore to subscribe today.
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    • 20 min
    How Sharks Devoured My Career

    How Sharks Devoured My Career

    When Nat Geo Explorer Gibbs Kuguru was in college, he found himself trying to choose between two terrifying futures: going free diving with sharks off the coast of South Africa or, even scarier, studying for the MCAT. Since then, he’s become devoted to sharks. His genetic research has shown they can do remarkable things, like change color to become more effective predators. And he’s also become a staunch advocate for shark species as they grow more vulnerable to overfishing and the effects of climate change.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.
    Want more?
    If you want more on Gibbs’s journey and his research, check out our story about him online.
    Plus, we’ve also got an article about how great whites change their color to sneak up on prey.
    Also explore
    You can watch Gibbs in the National Geographic documentary Camo Sharks. He and other scientists try to catch sharks in the middle of their color changes.
    And if you just can’t get enough of sharks, we’ve got a whole bunch of SharkFest stories for you, including how drones are changing how we observe and think about sharks.
    If you like what you hear and want to support more content like this, please consider a National Geographic subscription. Go to natgeo.com/exploremore to subscribe today.
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    • 27 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
28 Ratings

28 Ratings

LeinT ,

Wow

I’ve loved this podcast because it has tout me something new.

kategeorgia4 ,

Inspiring on both sides of the microphone

I love this podcast. As a young journalist it’s fascinating to hear the stories, but it’s also really solidified my dream to work for Nat Geo someday. Episodes are varied, voices are diverse (so many cool women and POC!!) it’s always interesting and inspiring to listen to. Seriously - are you guys hiring? 😍

Di HK ,

Fun Learning

These varied and interesting snippets of science, information, experiences and learning are addictive!

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