112 episodes

Every week Lochhead on Marketing ™ examines the mindset & strategies required to win.



This podcast is for executives and entrepreneurs who value counterintuitive marketing approaches coupled with category design and category creation strategies.



Host Christopher Lochhead is a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO, host of “100 Outstanding” podcast “Follow Your Different”, Amazon #1 bestselling author of “Niche Down” and “Play Bigger”. The Marketing Journal calls him “one of the best minds in marketing”, Fast Company call him “A Human Exclamation Point”, NBA Legend Bill Walton calls him a “quasar” and The Economist calls him “off-putting to some”.

Lochhead on Marketing Christopher Lochhead

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Every week Lochhead on Marketing ™ examines the mindset & strategies required to win.



This podcast is for executives and entrepreneurs who value counterintuitive marketing approaches coupled with category design and category creation strategies.



Host Christopher Lochhead is a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO, host of “100 Outstanding” podcast “Follow Your Different”, Amazon #1 bestselling author of “Niche Down” and “Play Bigger”. The Marketing Journal calls him “one of the best minds in marketing”, Fast Company call him “A Human Exclamation Point”, NBA Legend Bill Walton calls him a “quasar” and The Economist calls him “off-putting to some”.

    110 Category Creation: How To Dam The Demand

    110 Category Creation: How To Dam The Demand

    With Category Design or Category Creation strategy, we often talk about the distinction between capturing existing demand, and creating new demand.



    In this episode of Lochhead on Marketing, let’s talk about an in-between strategy that category designers use as a powerful tool in creating demand. That is to dam existing demand and redirect it in their own way, like the way a dam redirects water.

    Damming the Demand

    Marc Benioff, found of Salesforce.com, used this approach when marketing his new category. Bear in mind that when he launched Salesforce Automation as a CRM, CRM was already an established category. What made Benioff legendary is how he redirected the CRM traffic to Salesforce.



    All it took was an idea: Sure, you want CRM, but you don’t want one that’s only available on-premise. Cloud CRM is where it’s at.



    By adding a modifier to CRM, he dammed the demand for the old category and redirected it to his own. He’s creating a difference that did not exist in the minds of the market. Most importantly, he creates a new choice for them.

    Expanding Your Reach

    Much like Salesforce, Peloton did the exact same thing and ran away with it. They offered an alternative to boutique fitness in the form of home fitness. Yet again, it’s a choice that the market did not anticipate would have a demand. Peloton harnessed that demand and redirected it to their new category.



    From there, they expanded it from Spin classes to treads. Eventually, they added home classes for Yoga, Pilates, and other activities usually reserved for group boutique fitness.



    The use of the term Home Fitness created a demand that wasn't there before. It's like creating the void yourself and filling it up with your own category creation.

    Tried and Tested in Category Creation

    It turns out damming demand has been around for a long time. Henry Ford did the same thing with his new category back then. He dammed the demand for a horse and buggy with his new category name.



    His new innovative category? It was the horseless carriage.



    The same could be said for Marty Cooper and his wireless phone, which lead to the mobile phone category.



    “Sometimes, new categories are named by what they are not. And when a category is named by what it is not, the category designer is purposely trying to dam demand.” – Christopher Lochhead



    While Microsoft did not follow this model, they nonetheless created a new demand from existing categories. They did so by combining their word processor, presentation, and spreadsheet application into a bigger category that is Microsoft Office. Now, you don’t have to buy each software separately, and most consumers expect other companies that offer the same services to also have everything in one whole bundle.



    So when you’re designing a new category, ask yourself: Where is existing demand that we can dam to drive revenue in the near term? Afterwards, how do we leverage the demand in the existing category to expand the demand of our own category design?

    Bio

    Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.



    He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.



    Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.



    In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.

    • 11 min
    109 Want To Do Legendary Marketing? Do The Opposite

    109 Want To Do Legendary Marketing? Do The Opposite

    In this episode of Lochhead on Marketing, let’s talk about how to stand out. In many ways, if you want to do legendary marketing, you need to do what the opposite of what most people do.



    Doing the Opposite

    As part of the mega category people refer to as Creators, there was something that we’ve noticed:

    People spend a lot of time telling other people how awesome they are.

    When you start looking at creator marketing, what you’ll see is a lot of creators just touting their best achievements and how great they are. Ergo, you should consume the content they create so you can share in his glory, or something.

    So what did we do? First of all, we do very little paid advertising. Recently, our friends at Podcast Magazine ran their annual edition that has a directory of all the top podcasts. What we did was buy a full-page ad in it. Though rather than your usual positive reviews and highlights, we ran it featuring negative reviews.



    “We ran an ad featuring negative reviews: “Off-putting to some” from The Economist and The Fall. “Annoying host uses profanity needlessly”, and “Very disappointing”. So imagine a photo of myself with those big headlines next to me.” – Christopher Lochhead



     

    Follow Your Different

    You might be asking: Why do this?

    John Bielenberg talks about how he’s always looking for the dog with the red hat. In other words, he’s looking for ways in order to stand out.

    At a time where people are bombarded with information from all sides, people have learned to tune things out. So if they see something that’s pretty much the same as any other information they’ve seen before, they pay less attention to it.

    Yet if something different suddenly comes along, say a dog with a red hat, you’d immediately notice it. Because it’s new and it’s not something you see every day.

    So I would encourage people to do the opposite of everyone else and stand out amongst the crowd.



    “In our case here with this ad, the creator industry is stuffed with what I would call self-congratulatory influencers and hustle porn stars. They are all very busy breaking their arms, patting themselves on the back. So we said, what's the opposite? Well, the opposite is running an ad with negative reviews in it.” – Christopher Lochhead



     

    Things that Drive Us

    If you’re not convinced or still wondering why we did all this, here are seven key things that were driving us… sort of.



    * It was Funny

    * It’s Different

    * It's Provocative

    * This is a first in #podcasting

    * Category designers force a choice, not a comparison

    * Knowing who is NOT your customer, is more important than know who IS your customer

    * I want to empower all creators to say "fuck the haters!"



    We share that story with you to encourage you to think in broad and unconventional ways before you're going to take on any marketing or advertising.

    Ask yourself: “what's the opposite of what everyone else would do here? What's provocative? What's funny?”  You ask yourself, “what is everybody in our industry doing? What is the exact opposite of that?”

    You don't have to do exactly the opposite. Just map it out and see what others are not doing, and eventually new ideas will probably emerge. As you're looking for those new ideas, start with what's the opposite. Do what John Bielenberg suggests, and go find your dog with a red hat.



    Bio

    Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.

    He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.

    Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company,

    • 10 min
    108 Advice for 30 Year Old Marketers

    108 Advice for 30 Year Old Marketers

    In this episode of Lochhead on Marketing, let us talk about some advice for 30 year old marketers.



    I have been asked this question a bunch of times, so I just put together my response as a LinkedIn post. A lot of people though it was a great list, so I thought I’d share it with you.

    Making the List

    As said earlier, this list was originally a LinkedIn post, and it’s a list of practical advice for 30 year old marketers. There were some who asked if it was in a certain order, and one outright challenged me to do so.



    I did not want to do that because I wanted to present them as ideas. Because what might be important for me might not be for others.



    Sure enough in the comments, different things on the list resonated with different people.



    Though there is an argument to be made about creating lists in certain order, so as to elicit something close to a call to action.



    “It seems we live in a world of prescriptions, where people want to do lists and more and more inane sort of business and marketing advice. You know, the seven things Elon Musk does before breakfast. And we've gotten to a place where a lot of content about business, about self-help, about marketing is very pablumatic and sort of at a prescription level, do this, do that, etc.” – Christopher Lochhead



    While we do create prescription type articles, mostly on what you should and shouldn’t do, that’s not how we work most of the time. Our job is to give people ideas, and with those ideas, they can come up with different combinations or new ways to approach things. We feel that having something close to a to-do list hinders that process.

    The Advice for 30 Year Old Marketers

    That said, here’s the list of Advice for 30 Year Old Marketers, in no particular order:



    * Do legendary work

    * Position yourself or be positioned

    * You're not too young to be a CMO, or start a company

    * Stop giving a shit about what other people think of you, it’s a trap

    * Thinking about thinking is the most important thinking

    * Most marketers have been recruited into the cult of the brand

    * Categories make brands, not the other way around

    * Marketers who create new demand, are most in demand

    * They are called category designers

    * Nobody legendary is working on their “personal brand”

    * The most influential people in the world are not “influencers”

    * Only work on legendary teams

    * If your company is not going to be a category queen, quit

    * Be very careful who’s content you consume

    * 90% of what we get taught about marketing is BS

    * Learn to write

    * Make friends with other Superstar 30 year old’s

    * One day, you might rule the world together

    * It goes by fast, soak up every second



    Bio

    Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.



    He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.



    Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.



    In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.



    He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient,

    • 7 min
    107 Did The Roaring 2020s Just Start?: The Economy (Part 2)

    107 Did The Roaring 2020s Just Start?: The Economy (Part 2)

    Welcome to the second of a special two-part series here on Lochhead on Marketing called, “Did the Roaring 2020s Just Start?” In this episode, we talk about the Economy.

    We believe there is a chance we could be heading into a time of unprecedented economic growth. For a year now, a Categorynado of newness has been gaining momentum. There has never been a higher receptivity to new “stuff”.

    Now of course I’m no economist, but I thought it would be powerful to connect some dots on some critical data points in our economy through the category lens.

    This two-part series is based on a recent letter published in Category Pirates, my newsletter with co-pirates Eddie Yoon and Nicolas Cole. Go check it out today!

    Drawing Parallels

    Before we get to the 2020s, let’s talk about the roaring 1920s, and the parallels to what we are experiencing today. At the time it was the end of a pandemic, there was an explosion of new technology, and there was a rocking and raging stock market as well as an explosion of new categories. There were also political and international tensions on proving who was the best that drove development.

    Fast forward to today, and we are experiencing the same thing. Only instead of television and vacuum cleaners, our new categories involve AI, Robotics, and information technology.



    “That's what was going on in the 1920s. So for example, electric blenders televisions and vacuum cleaners were categories that took off. Now let's think about what's going on in the 2020s. Same thing with the pandemic. Of course, same thing with technology and new categories. Only this time around the new categories are things like AI, video communications, robots, self-learning, robot vacuums, citizen space travel, the electrification of everything and digital Education, telemedicine.” – Christopher Lochhead



     

    Bannister Breakthroughs are Everywhere

    We’ve talked about Bannister Breakthroughs in part one of the Roaring 2020s, and how we see it all around us nowadays. Strangely enough, the 1920s also had a lot of Bannister Breakthrough moments. There was an explosion of new categories and ideas brought about by the limitation of the pandemic.

    Electricity became widespread to households, new innovations in the automobile industry drove down prices, which brought about various lifestyle and economic impacts. Mail order became a booming category, and companies like Sears. Roebuck and Co. became category kings in this regard.

    If you look at how things are today, it is eerily similar yet slightly different at the same time. E-Commerce is booming, and there has been a drive for more efficient electric devices like e-bikes and robo-vacuums. Of course, there’s also Tesla paving the way for developing electronic hybrid cars.

    Experts are predicting that another ‘roaring 20s’ is in the making. The Wall Street Journal reported that analysts have increased their economic growth forecast for 2021 to 5.95%

    The last time the U.S. economy hit a growth rate anything like that was in 1984.

     

    Looking at the Tailwinds

    Let's take a look at some major tailwinds that we can see on the horizon. First of all, cash. a href="https://www.wsj.

    • 21 min
    106 Did The Roaring 2020s Just Start? Bannister Breakthroughs (Part 1)

    106 Did The Roaring 2020s Just Start? Bannister Breakthroughs (Part 1)

    Welcome to a special two-part series on Lochhead on Marketing called, “Did the Roaring 2020s Just Start?” In this episode, we talk about the Bannister Breakthroughs, and how its influence can be seen everywhere today.



    We believe there is a chance we could be heading into a time of unprecedented economic growth. We’ll get to the specifics of it in part 2, but for this episode, let’s talk about how category breakthroughs can lead to even more category breakthroughs. If we play our cards right, we might be living at the greatest time for new innovation in history!



    This two-part series is based on a recent letter published in Category Pirates, my newsletter with the legendary co-pirates Eddie Yoon and Nicolas Cole.

    Breaking Through the Limits

    On May 6th 1954, a young British land named Roger Bannister broke the four-minute mile. Before the feat was achieved, this was deemed impossible or only doable under the right circumstances. Yet Bannister broke records and expectations by doing it his way.



    The Harvard Business Review published a terrific summary of the story:



    “The four-minute barrier stood for decades — and when it fell, the circumstances defied the confident predictions of the best minds in the sport. Experts believed they knew the precise conditions under which the mark would fall. It would have to be in perfect weather — 68 degrees and no wind. On a particular kind of track — hard, dry clay, and in front of a huge, boisterous crowd urging the runner on to his best-ever performance. But Bannister did it on a cold day, on a wet track, at a small meet in Oxford, England, before a crowd of just a few thousand people.”



    Roger Bannister’s achievement served as the breakthrough that led to more breakthroughs in the world of competitive running. Only 46 days later, the “impossible” record was broken again. A year after that, three runners broke the four-minute mile in a single race.



    Much like Bannister, legendary innovators and category designers make the impossible possible. While it may seem mundane now — like Bannister’s four-minute breakthrough, it still serves as a catalyst for others to believe that something impossible could be done. It makes people receptive to the idea that there is a possibility that they can explore which leads to a different future.

    Creating a Before and After

    The results of a Bannister Breakthrough or creating a revolutionary category always creates a before and after. People who bear witness to both sides are changed as a result. They either embrace it, or find new ways and breakthroughs themselves.



    “Category designers, innovators, entrepreneurs, that's what they do. They create a before and after they change reality, they make new possibilities into new realities.” - Christopher Lochhead



    Category designers create a before and after they change reality, they make new possibilities into new realities.



    In Rogers' case, he smashed an imaginary what seemed like an immovable milestone. His breakthrough, like all legendary breakthroughs, opened up others to ask, “What else is possible?”

    Bannister Breakthroughs Everywhere

    Fast forward to today, where you can see Bannister breakthroughs happening everywhere. With information at our fingertips, you’ll see people come up with new categories to solve things others didn’t know they even needed up until today.



    For a more relatable example, having a large-scale remote workforce wasn’t deemed possible before. It was always a means for emergency access to work for some,

    • 13 min
    105 Value is 100% Perception

    105 Value is 100% Perception

    In this episode, Christopher Lochhead talks about value, and how it is 100% dependent on people’s perception. That is to say, nothing has any intrinsic value until someone believes it has value.



    You can also learn about one of the greatest stories about how an entrepreneur and category designer created value, that is to say, the perception of value for a product that left a lot of people scratching their heads.

    Gary’s Pet Rock

    Gary Dahl and his pet rock is an amazing study on how people assign value to something based on their perception.



    In 1975, Gary Dahl thought it would be funny to sell pet rocks. He never would’ve thought that this funny running gag would sweep the nation, selling roughly 1.5 million pet rocks at $3.95 a pop.



    Christopher remembers his sister wanting to join in the fad, so he offered to catch her a pet rock himself.



    “I remember this well. I was a kid at the time and my sister wanted one, and I remember exactly what I said at the time: “Well, if you like, I'll go outside and catch you a wild one.” “- Christopher Lochhead



    Was it a weird fad? Probably. Yet it wasn’t the first of its kind, and certainly not the last crazy fad people subscribed to.

    Value is in the Perception

    While it may seem silly that Gary Dahl managed to sell that many pet rocks, but how he marketed it was nothing short of genius.



    He packaged it in a colorful box that even had holes so your pet rock can “breathe”. There was even a comprehensive manual on how you can take care of your pet rock, which just adds to the hilarity of it all.



    Basically, Gary Dahl assigned a value to his pet rocks. As a Category Designer and some brilliant marketing, he made people perceive the Pet Rock as something of value. All due to the story he weaved to back it up.



    So what does this teach us? For Christopher it means that nothing is intrinsically valuable. That value is 100 percent a perception.



    “If you're a regular listener, you've heard me and you've heard Jason talking about these new NFTs in the digital space: people selling digital products at extraordinary prices. Jason made the comment that his dad is in the art business and he grew up in that business. In his words, what sells a painting is a story. And so what makes something valuable is that people perceive it as valuable.” - Christopher Lochhead





    Creating Value Out of Nothing

    Legendary category designers are legendary because they create new perceptions of value. They establish the belief that something is valuable when that belief did not exist before.



    So as category designers, the challenge is to change people’s perception about your product or services. If you are successful, you can create something valuable… out of nothing.

    Bio

    Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.



    He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.



    Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.



    In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.



    He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; the foundi...

    • 8 min

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