20 episodes

Sea Change Radio covers the transformations to social, environmental, and economic sustainability. Change is accelerating in positive and negative directions: the clock is ticking in the race to see which will tip first—the problems or the solutions. Join Sea Change's Host, Alex Wise, as he provides in-depth analysis to help our audience understand possible remedies and potential pitfalls. Sea Change interviews sustainability experts including Paul Hawken, Stewart Brand, Bill McKibben, Lester Brown, and many others. Sea Change airs on over 60 radio stations around the country.

Sea Change Radio Alex Wise

    • Business
    • 4.9 • 47 Ratings

Sea Change Radio covers the transformations to social, environmental, and economic sustainability. Change is accelerating in positive and negative directions: the clock is ticking in the race to see which will tip first—the problems or the solutions. Join Sea Change's Host, Alex Wise, as he provides in-depth analysis to help our audience understand possible remedies and potential pitfalls. Sea Change interviews sustainability experts including Paul Hawken, Stewart Brand, Bill McKibben, Lester Brown, and many others. Sea Change airs on over 60 radio stations around the country.

    Bianca Fortis on Florida’s Efforts to Disenfranchise Former Prisoners

    Bianca Fortis on Florida’s Efforts to Disenfranchise Former Prisoners

    Florida sort of defines the term "swing state." The smallest of variables can push the outcome of Florida's elections in one direction or another - in the year 2000 it was "hanging chads" and more recently it appeared it would be the re-enfranchisement of former felons. In 2018, Florida voters overwhelmingly passed Amendment 4, which restored the voting rights of most felons who had completed their sentences. This was a particularly important turn of events given the massive number of Floridians who could not vote due to felony convictions. Republican leadership in the state, however, has been working tirelessly to undermine the will of the people by making it harder for the formerly incarcerated to exercise their franchise. Some of the obstacles that have been erected include a requirement to clear all debts in order to vote - some former felons have actually been criminally prosecuted for voting without paying what in effect amounts to a poll tax. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to journalist Bianca Fortis who has written an investigative piece chronicling right wing efforts to keep Florida’s most vulnerable populations from participating in the democratic process. Then we dip into the archives to listen to our 2020 discussion with groundbreaking health physicist and nuclear expert, Hattie Carwell.



    00:01 Narrator - This is Sea Change Radio, covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise.



    00:10 Bianca Fortis - The State of Florida accounts for more than 1/4 of the entire disenfranchised population in the United States.



    00:29 Narrator - Florida sort of defines the term "swing state." The smallest of variables can push the outcome of Florida's elections in one direction or another - in the year 2000 it was "hanging chads" and more recently it appeared it would be the re-enfranchisement of former felons. In 2018, Florida voters overwhelmingly passed Amendment 4, which restored the voting rights of most felons who had completed their sentences. This was a particularly important turn of events given the massive number of Floridians who could not vote due to felony convictions. Republican leadership in the state, however, has been working tirelessly to undermine the will of the people by making it harder for the formerly incarcerated to exercise their franchise. Some of the obstacles that have been erected include a requirement to clear all debts in order to vote - some former felons have actually been criminally prosecuted for voting without paying what in effect amounts to a poll tax. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to journalist Bianca Fortis who has written an investigative piece chronicling right wing efforts to keep Florida’s most vulnerable populations from participating in the democratic process. Then we dip into the archives to listen to our 2020 discussion with groundbreaking health physicist and nuclear expert, Hattie Carwell.



    1:56 Alex Wise (AW) - I'm joined now on Sea Change Radio by Bianca Fortis. Bianca is a journalist and a reporting fellow at Pro Publica. Bianca, welcome to Sea Change Radio.



    2:06 Bianca Fortis (BF) - Thank you for having me.



    2:08 AW - So I wanted to discuss a piece that you wrote for Pro Publica July 21st, entitled “A Government official helped them register. Now they've been charged with voter fraud,” and it's about the Florida voting story that's kind of been in the news for five years now running, it's taken an ugly turn, and I wanted to highlight it here on Sea Change Radio. Before we dive into what's currently happening right now, why don't you give us a little bit of back story on the history of this topic of felon voting, not just in Florida, but nationally?



    2:46 BF - So across the United States,

    • 29 min
    “To Serve & Protect” Whom? Alec Karakatsanis on Copaganda

    “To Serve & Protect” Whom? Alec Karakatsanis on Copaganda

    What comes to mind when you hear the words "crime" and "safety?" For many, these words evoke images of poor people stealing things, or police enforcing laws to suppress street crime. Our guest today on Sea Change Radio argues that there's a whole set of crimes that have been intentionally omitted from the messaging we get and that, for many, "police" and "safety" are far from synonymous. This week we speak with Alec Karakatsanis, the founder and executive director of Civil Rights Corps. A former public defender and the author of “Usual Cruelty: The Complicity of Lawyers in the Criminal Injustice System,” Karakatsanis believes that much of our country’s perspective on crime and policing has been shaped by "copaganda," the swaying of public opinion for the benefit of law enforcement. We look at the corrosive societal effects of historic and current police practices, examine how and why these wrongheaded approaches persist, and discuss the complicity of journalists and policymakers who fall for and then perpetuate the American mythology of crime and safety.



    00:01 Narrator - This is Sea Change Radio, covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise.



    00:20 Alec Karakatsanis (AK) - If you everyday on the news see a story of someone shoplifting from a pharmacy but you never hear a story about that pharmacy stealing from its own workers, then you're going to think that the shoplifting is a more of a problem than wage theft. Even though the exactly the opposite is true. And there are different kinds of problems, right? And there are different kinds of solutions.



    00:00:44 Narrator - What comes to mind when you hear the words "crime" and "safety?" For many, these words evoke images of poor people stealing things, or police enforcing laws to suppress street crime. Our guest today on Sea Change Radio argues that there's a whole set of crimes that have been intentionally omitted from the messaging we get and that, for many, "police" and "safety" are far from synonymous. This week we speak with Alec Karakatsanis, the founder and executive director of Civil Rights Corps. A former public defender and the author of “Usual Cruelty: The Complicity of Lawyers in the Criminal Injustice System,” Karakatsanis believes that much of our country’s perspective on crime and policing has been shaped by "copaganda," the swaying of public opinion for the benefit of law enforcement. We look at the corrosive societal effects of historic and current police practices, examine how and why these wrongheaded approaches persist, and discuss the complicity of journalists and policymakers who fall for and then perpetuate the American mythology of crime and safety.



    02:05 Alex Wise (AW) - I'm joined now on Sea Change Radio by Alec Karakatsanis. He is the founder and executive director of Civil Rights Corps. Alec, welcome to Sea Change Radio.



    02:14 Alec Karakatsanis (AK)  - Thank you for having me.



    02:16 AW So you have a newsletter entitled Copaganda, Alec’s Copaganda Newsletter. Why don't you define copaganda for us?



    02:24 AK - I think there are a lot of ways to understand what copaganda is, so I don't purport to have the definitive understanding of the term, but essentially what it reflects is the way in which a very special kind of propaganda is weaponized by powerful interests in government, in the corporate world and the media. To change the way we think about public safety, change that we think about the criminal punishment bureaucracy and the way we think about police, prosecutors, judges, courts, jails, prisons,

    • 29 min
    RL Miller of Climate Hawks Vote on the Inflation Reduction Act

    RL Miller of Climate Hawks Vote on the Inflation Reduction Act

    Are you weary of having to care about where headline-seeking Senators Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema land on important topics? Well, according to this week's guest on Sea Change Radio, relief may be in sight. This week we speak with grassroots organizer and Democratic insider RL Miller to dig deeper into the politics, logistics and the climate impact of the Inflation Reduction Act. The president and founder of Climate Hawks Vote, Miller believes Manchin is starting to see his star fade as he watches more progressive Democratic Senate hopefuls making inroads - she believes this is a key impetus for his and Sinema's connection to this bill, and perhaps a sign of things to come. We also get a harrowing glimpse into Miller's first-hand experience with the California wildfires.



    00:01 Narrator - This is Sea Change Radio, covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise.



    00:16 RL Miller - We are 100 days out from a midterm election on N8 and we are in pretty good shape to hold the Senate and adds to the Senate Majority. And if we elect Mandela Barnes and John Fetterman and Cheri Beasley and a couple of other people, Joe Manchin loses his role as kingmaker of the United States Senate.



    00:40 Narrator - Are you weary of having to care about where headline-seeking Senators Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema land on important topics? Well, according to this week's guest on Sea Change Radio, relief may be in sight. This week we speak with grassroots organizer and Democratic insider RL Miller to dig deeper into the politics, logistics and the climate impact of the Inflation Reduction Act. The president and founder of Climate Hawks Vote, Miller believes Manchin is starting to see his star fade as he watches more progressive Democratic Senate hopefuls making inroads - she believes this is a key impetus for his and Sinema's connection to this bill, and perhaps a sign of things to come. We also get a harrowing glimpse into Miller's first-hand experience with the California wildfires.



    01:39 Alex Wise - I'm joined now on Sea Change Radio by RL Miller. She is the founder and president of Climate Hawks vote and she is an elected member of the DNC and she served as the Chair Person of the California Democratic Party's Environmental Caucus for eight years. RL, welcome to Sea Change Radio.



    02:00 RL Miller - Thanks so much for having me on.



    02:02 Alex Wise - Well, it's a pleasure and very timely because follow you on Twitter. You're a very keen observer and we are in the midst of seeing some legislation (fingers crossed) pass this week through the Senate. It was called the Build Back Better bill. That's a mouthful. And now the new mouthful is the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022. But before we dive into that, I want to learn a little bit more about the mission of Climate Hawks Vote and how your organization has tried to tackle the connection between fossil fuels and the political class.



    02:42 RL Miller - I founded Climate Hawks vote in 2014 because I was deeply frustrated with Democratic politicians and Republican politicians. Republican politicians being in total denial of course. “Oh no, there's no such thing as climate change.” While Democratic politicians would pay lip service to it. Say that yes, of course it's very important. Oh, we need to do something by 2050. OK, we'll do something somewhere down the road and they would just keep on kicking the can down the road. Meanwhile, immigration demands attention. Right now, healthcare demands attention. Right now, gun violence right now, et cetera, et cetera. And so so many other priorities competing for democratic politicians attention. Nobody was doing anything about climate change now, and so I founded Climate Hawks vote with the idea of getting politicians to pa...

    • 29 min
    Daniel Nichanian on the Nuts and Bolts of Local Elections

    Daniel Nichanian on the Nuts and Bolts of Local Elections

    Anyone who paid attention to the ugly aftermath of the 2020 presidential election suddenly realized that a coterie of state-level bureaucrats had a whole lot more power than we ever imagined. And it was a huge wake up call for those who have chosen not to vote in past local elections. Elections matter, even small ones. This week on Sea Change Radio, we welcome political scientist and election expert Daniel Nichanian to discuss the importance of local elections in this country and how his new media venture, Bolts Magazine, intends to shine a brighter light on small, but increasingly vital races in all fifty states. We talk about the upcoming midterms, uncover arcane election laws in certain states and examine what’s on the ballot locally in the wake of the Supreme Court’s reversal of Roe v. Wade.



    00:01 Narrator - This is Sea Change Radio, covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise.



    00:20 Daniel Nichanian (DN) - There are actually four states this year,Alex, where the partisan court balance could tip over in these elections, and those states are Michigan, Ohio, Illinois and in North Carolina. So in each of these states in particular, the elections in in November. Are going to have great importance on who runs state courts but also potentially on abortion access.



    00:46 Narrator - Anyone who paid attention to the ugly aftermath of the 2020 presidential election suddenly realized that a coterie of state-level bureaucrats had a whole lot more power than we ever imagined. And it was a huge wake up call for those who have chosen not to vote in past local elections. Elections matter, even small ones. This week on Sea Change Radio, we welcome political scientist and election expert Daniel Nichanian to discuss the importance of local elections in this country and how his new media venture, Bolts Magazine, intends to shine a brighter light on small, but increasingly vital races in all fifty states. We talk about the upcoming midterms, uncover arcane election laws in certain states and examine what’s on the ballot locally in the wake of the Supreme Court’s reversal of Roe v. Wade.00:01:49AW



    01:52 Alex Wise (AW) - I'm joined now on Sea Change Radio by Daniel Nichanian. He is the founder and editor-in-chief of Bolts Magazine. Daniel, welcome to Sea Change Radio.



    02:00 Daniel Nichanian (DN) It's great to join you. Thanks for having me.



    02:02 AW - Well, it's a treat for me. I've been following you on Twitter at @Taniel for so many years now and have found your Twitter feed to be a real important resource for election analysis. And you really get into the weeds more than your average analyst on Twitter, so this newest venture of yours, Bolts, why don't you tell us first a little bit about the mission of this?



    02:32 DN - Yeah, thank you so much for having me in and I think you already started to capture why Bolts exists. Why, when saying I get in the weeds on Twitter, for many years, I'm sure many people who are who are going to hear this interview have been interested in change. And really, who has the authority and an ability to enact change in in the US, right, and our attention usually goes, often goes to the federal government to Washington DC to Congress, obviously is very important, and the President obviously is very important but on many of the issues that really interest a lot of people, the power and greed, enact change and make a big difference is often at the state level and the county level and the municipal level. And that's where things get a little iffy in terms of people really following or the information infrastructure following and pinpointing not just the right people who are making the decisions, but also really the type of authority they have and the ability they have to ...

    • 29 min
    Indonesian Coal + Food For Soul

    Indonesian Coal + Food For Soul

    This week on Sea Change Radio, we dig into the archives and listen to two very different stories about consumption. First, we speak to global journalist Nithin Coca who has written a series of pieces for Mongabay.com about Indonesia’s alarming headfirst dive into the coal industry. We discuss the high-level corruption that allowed coal to take off in Indonesia, examine the lax regulatory standards that imperil workers while allowing the country to keep export prices low and learn about the environmental degradation that the Indonesian coal boom is causing. Then we revisit our conversation with Lara Gilmore, who along with her husband, chef and restaurateur Massimo Bottura, run the world-renowned Osteria Francescana in Modena, Italy. In addition to running a three-star Michelin restaurant, Bottura and Gilmore have created a unique template for feeding the needy through their nonprofit, Food For Soul. Based on the concept of the Italian refettorio, a place where monks gathered together to share their meals, Food For Soul has elevated the soup kitchen to a whole new level, cooking and serving delicious meals in warm, elegant environments.



    00:01 Narrator - This is Sea Change Radio, covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise.



    00:17 Lara Gilmore - I think that the most important thing is we realized that food for soul was not only a platform and a refettorio to be able to give a meal to someone in need, but also a teaching platform for people to understand how to cook better at home and waste less food.



    00:36 Narrator - This week on Sea Change Radio, we dig into the archives and listen to two very different stories about consumption. First, we speak to global journalist Nithin Coca who has written a series of pieces for Mongabay.com about Indonesia’s alarming headfirst dive into the coal industry. We discuss the high-level corruption that allowed coal to take off in Indonesia, examine the lax regulatory standards that imperil workers while allowing the country to keep export prices low and learn about the environmental degradation that the Indonesian coal boom is causing. Then we revisit our conversation with Lara Gilmore, who along with her husband, chef and restaurateur Massimo Bottura, run the world-renowned Osteria Francescana in Modena, Italy. In addition to running a three-star Michelin restaurant, Bottura and Gilmore have created a unique template for feeding the needy through their nonprofit, Food For Soul. Based on the concept of the Italian refettorio, a place where monks gathered together to share their meals, Food For Soul has elevated the soup kitchen to a whole new level, cooking and serving delicious meals in warm, elegant environments.



    2:09 Alex Wise - I'm joined now on Sea Change Radio by global journalist Nithin Coca. Nithin, welcome to Sea change Radio.



    2:15 Nithin Coca - Oh great, great to be here.



    2:16 Alex Wise So you have a few pieces in Mongabay that are quite interesting that I wanted to discuss with you about Indonesia and its coal industry. I was kind of surprised that Indonesia has flung itself with such force into coal, which so many of us think of as just a dying fuel. Why don't you first kind of give us a thumbnail sketch of of how this started? How did Indonesia kind of decide to go to what you call fossil fuels final frontier?



    2:46 Nithin Coca - Yeah, I'd be happy to. So I think Indonesia has always been, I guess since independence and even before it got independence from the Dutch in the 1940s and 50s. Like always, a resource export country. And you know previous waves of exports were focused on like timber, spices, palm oil in the 90s, and then I guess around the turn of the century, Indonesia really started ramping up its production of coal. Basically, he went from being like almost a non player in global exports to being last year...

    • 29 min
    The Revelator’s John Platt on Endangered Species

    The Revelator’s John Platt on Endangered Species

    Historian and philosopher Yuval Harari writes, "When the first humans reached Australia about 45,000 years ago, they quickly drove to extinction 90% of its large animals. This was the first significant impact that Homo sapiens had on the planet's ecosystem. It was not the last." This week on Sea Change Radio, we discuss extinction with longtime journalist and founder of the environmental news site, The Revelator, John Platt. We look at efforts around the planet to save endangered plants and animals, explore the plight of smaller, often overlooked creatures, and examine the effects of war on fragile ecosystems.  



    00:01 Narrator: This is Sea Change Radio, covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise.



    00:13 John Platt: And then what happens if you lose a tiger from an ecosystem? Then you lose all the all the functions that it provided. Maybe small herbivores and they're going to go out of control and eat all the vegetation down. We've seen that in this country with when when Wolves died out the the deer took off. So I mean there are some species we may eventually only see in zoos, but I hope we can avoid that.



    00:46 Narrator: In and philosopher Yuval Harari writes. “When the first humans reached Australia about 45,000 years ago, they quickly drove to extinction. 90% of its large animals. This was the first significant impact that Homo sapiens had on the planet's ecosystem. It was not the last.” This week on Sea Change Radio we discuss extinction with longtime journalist and founder of the Environmental News site, the Revelator, John Platt. We look at efforts around the planet to save endangered plants and animals, explore the plight of smaller, often overlooked creatures and examine the effects of war on fragile ecosystems.



    1:44 Alex Wise: I'm joined now on Sea Change Radio by John Platt. John is the editor and founder of the Revelator. John, welcome to Sea Change Radio.



    1:53 John Platt: Thank you very much.



    1:55 Alex Wise: First, why don't you tell our listeners what the Revelator is - what your organization's mission is, and maybe a little bit on your background in the extinction space.



    2:05 John Platt: Yeah, the Revelator is an environmental news and commentary site. We're published by the Center for Biological Diversity, which is a nonprofit devoted to environmental. Choose we're editorially independent from them, but we'd still tell a lot of the same types of subjective stories covering the extinction crisis, climate change, oceans, clean water and environmental justice and we're trying to tell stories that aren't being told in other places and really influence people who are super involved in the environment and care very deeply and passionately about this stuff. I've been an environmental journalist now for over 15 years. I've freelanced for 10 of that and I started writing about endangered species because I thought that was something that wasn't being covered in the general media. I was writing for Scientific American and a bunch of other places, and covered well over 1000 species. I kind of stopped counting once I hit 1000, and I've written more than a few species obituaries over the years, so it's been a big part of my life and it's something that I find infinitely interesting because there's so many interesting species to write about and so many interesting people researching and trying to save these incredible creatures.



    3:20 Alex Wise: And you dive into the actual species that aren't necessarily covered by mainstream media, as often you'll see a snippet, maybe at the end of the PBS news hour about some panda made. Or the megafauna gets a lot more press, but we've done some pieces as of late that I thought were really interesting in term...

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
47 Ratings

47 Ratings

malfoxley ,

Great show!

The hosts of the podcast, highlight all aspects of sustainability and more in this can’t miss podcast! The hosts and expert guests offer insightful advice and information that is helpful to anyone that listens!

J. Barshop ,

Deeply substantial and amazingly practical

It’s obvious that Alex puts extraordinary effort in covering salient topics and finding guests that are authentic and truly care about being a positive force in this world - the insights they bring to bear is still mind-blowing Every. Single. Time.

No matter the subject, you’re guaranteed to gain something from every episode - can’t recommend Sea Change Radio enough 🙌

Leifcycle ,

Informative, smart and just the right amount of depth

Alex finds excellent guests and asks good questions. I enjoy the musical interludes and their often humorous connection to the subject of discussion.

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