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Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

The Intelligence from The Economist itunesu_sunset

    • News
    • 4.9 • 44 Ratings

Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

    But who’s counting? Voting rights in America

    But who’s counting? Voting rights in America

    Democrats will spend the week battling for a tightening of laws on casting votes; that will overshadow Republicans’ worrying push into how those votes are counted and certified. Earthquakes remain damnably unpredictable, but new research suggests a route to early-warning systems. And why hammams, the declining bathhouses of the Arab world, will cling on despite even the challenge of covid-19. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 23 min
    His royal minus: Prince Andrew

    His royal minus: Prince Andrew

    The queen’s second son has been stripped of his titles—an apparent bid to insulate the crown from his legal troubles. But dangers to the prince and to the monarchy remain. A blockade of Mali, intended to force a return to democratic order, may worsen security and entrench foreign influences. And the genre of “eco-horror” evolves alongside environment-driven anxieties.
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    • 23 min
    In vino, veritas: Boris Johnson under fire

    In vino, veritas: Boris Johnson under fire

    While Britons followed covid strictures, the prime minister’s residence hosted boozy gatherings; widespread fury hints that his prevarications this time may be his last as leader. Religious institutions struggled during the pandemic, as all businesses did—so they are selling assets and courting new customers in innovative ways. And road rage is common, but in America it is getting decidedly deadlier. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 22 min
    Not in the same class: America and schools

    Not in the same class: America and schools

    The country’s children have missed more in-person learning than those in most of the rich world—to their cost. We ask why battles about schooling rage on. Rodrigo Duterte, the Philippine president, came to power on big promises; few were fulfilled. We ask about the skimpy legacy he leaves behind. And a look at the metaverse’s red-hot property market.
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    • 22 min
    Talking out his asks: Putin’s NATO demands

    Talking out his asks: Putin’s NATO demands

    This week’s flurry of diplomacy aims to address what Vladimir Putin, Russia’s president, says he wants. He cannot get it. Does an invasion of Ukraine hang in the balance? At an annual jamboree of economists our correspondent finds an unusual focus on the future—in particular the future of home working. And why Cuba has an enormous trade in grey-market garlic.
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    • 21 min
    Hope for the crest: an Omicron wave hits India

    Hope for the crest: an Omicron wave hits India

    The country has the world’s worst estimated covid-death total—but as another variant takes hold there are reasons for optimism. Mexico’s president has some old-fashioned notions about energy, and his pet legislation would make it both dirtier and costlier. And the Orient Express was itself a murder victim, just one line in a continent-spanning rail network that may yet be revived.
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    • 21 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
44 Ratings

44 Ratings

奶茶停 ,

Diverse intellectual discussion

I really like the podcast because it is very informative and involves different people projecting their opinions on current affairs. This really helps me to develop my own thinkings and perspectives on things happening around the world. The global coverage is just excellent. Thanks!

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Detailed unbiased

Both detailed and unbiased intelligent view

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