100 episodes

Bring some Spirit-filled peace into your hectic schedule every weekday morning with this new Daily Devotional.

Start your day with God
Renew your spirit
Refocus your faith

Be Still and Know Premier Christian Radio

    • Christianity

Bring some Spirit-filled peace into your hectic schedule every weekday morning with this new Daily Devotional.

Start your day with God
Renew your spirit
Refocus your faith

    Day 36 - Issue 31

    Day 36 - Issue 31

    Romans 12:4-5 NLT
    Just as our bodies have many parts and each part has a special function, so it is with Christ’s body. We are many parts of one body, and we all belong to each other.
    Last summer I ran down the garden, stretched down and picked up a fallen apple, recreating my great cricketing fielding past. I felt my right tricep scream out in complaint, and so began a journey of sorting out an injury.
    St Paul’s analogy of the human body (Ephesians 4) for the community of Christ is well-made. It’s all too easy to forget that we each exist and play an essential role in making the community function.
    After some delay after injuring my arm, I made an appointment with a physiotherapist and got some advice on how to manage the healing process. This was not instantaneous and demanded a lot of me, some of which included further physical discomfort. The tricep injury impacted my ability to cook, garden and do other tasks.
    There is a unity to the human body in that each part is designed to work with every other part. This enables each one of us to live an effective human life. So too within the body of Christ. There is a unity, which can only be achieved when we respect the role each part plays in the wider objective of revealing God’s kingdom on earth.
    Of course, we carry injuries from time to time. And injuries take time to repair. Some do so naturally; yet others benefit from some specialist and external advice. But ignoring an injury is unwise and can delay recovery. Self-diagnosis is also risky. Best to acknowledge and address the injury, seeking informed advice to aid a return to full effectiveness.
    The benefit of injuries is that I can learn from them and so ensure that I continue to function well, despite the natural impact of ageing, both physically and spiritually.
    QUESTION: What injuries are you carrying today?
    PRAYER: Thank you for the gift of local church and for the variety of people in them.

    • 4 min
    Day 35 - Issue 31

    Day 35 - Issue 31

    Ephesians 4:2-3 NLT
    Always be humble and gentle. Be patient with each other, making allowance for each other’s faults because of your love. Make every effort to keep yourselves united in the Spirit, binding yourselves together with peace.
    One thing the tortuous Brexit journey has taught us is the damage disunity causes. What started as a simple referendum contained within it the capacity to freeze our constitutional process and unleash a torrent of angry words across the media and our streets. Divisions emerged within families, friends and within our so-called United Kingdom.
    Unity is most often an ideal spoken of rather than a choice acted out. Paul tells us that this good begins when I demonstrate patience, refraining from the enforcement of something (such as a right, or obligation) that I feel is due to me.
    This means learning to walk out of step with the prevailing march of society. Here I am encouraged to press my own case, often presented as self-esteem. In reality, self-esteem is about self-respect, and not self-promotion. When I am quietly confident and can make allowances and space for others, accepting that their woundedness may drive their behaviour, I maintain the ability to press for unity. When I am stung to fight back, I must be careful this is not wounded pride or raw competition arising from a need to justify or prove my case or myself. Jesus saw no need to justify himself before his accusers (Isaiah 53:3-9), even though they were completely in the wrong. Jesus knew who he was, his mission and purpose, and was able to ensure those forces that aimed at disunity were utterly frustrated in their attempts to continue the chaos of the Fall.
    What efforts might you make to tip the scales in favour of unity?
    QUESTION: Are you contributing to unity or disunity?
    PRAYER: Help me discern your voice among the many that swirl within my head as I seek to walk in the path of unity.

    • 5 min
    Day 34 - Issue 31

    Day 34 - Issue 31

    2 Corinthians 13:11 NLT
    Dear brothers and sisters, I close my letter with these last words: Be joyful. Grow to maturity. Encourage each other. Live in harmony and peace. Then the God of love and peace will be with you.
    The Centre for the Study of Global Christianity at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary estimated there were 34,000 denominations in 2000, rising to an estimated 43,000 in 2012. Numbers have exploded from 1,600 in the year 1900. Denominations are described as separate organisations, not necessarily separate beliefs. However, there will be many nuances of belief that led to each one establishing an independent identity.
    It is clearly not an ideal use of energy and resources to constantly create new expressions of Christian organisation. There is strength when we discover the willingness and ability to work together while holding our differences in tension. There may well be significant issues of difference that make it impossible for me to maintain unity; however, these are few and far between.
    It was only as I trained and then worked as a mediator I discovered the essential nature of unity, even though I’d already been a Christian for many years. As followers of Christ, we are invited to find joy in our hearts. When I settle upon a position to defend, I lose my capacity to be joyful. I grow defensive and aggressively advance my cause. This, Paul reminds us, is a sign of immaturity even as we seek to grow up into maturity in Christ.
    Maturity generates a positive mindset. With this we encourage each other, and which of us fails to find joy when encouraged? We also create a context in which we want to listen to each other, and from such active listening, we establish a harmonious relationship. This is attractive and draws others in, for each of us seeks a peaceful space in which to build friendships and to flourish. This is truly a God-centred space, one within which the love of God is both experienced and shared with those beyond its borders.
    QUESTION: What steps do you need to take to find and then sustain your joy?
    PRAYER: May I be joyful, encourage others, live today in harmony and peace, and grow in maturity as your disciple today.

    • 4 min
    Day 33 - Issue 31

    Day 33 - Issue 31

    Proverbs 3:3-4 NLT
    'Never let loyalty and kindness leave you! Tie them around your neck as a reminder. Write them deep within your heart. Then you will find favour with both God and people, and you will earn a good reputation.'
    The origins of Valentine’s Day are unclear. One possibility is that St Valentine ignored a decree from the Roman emperor Claudius II, which banned marriage. Claudius decided that single men made far better fighting soldiers, and so outlawed weddings. Valentine, a Christian priest, considered this unjust and continued to marry couples, which cost him his life.
    Scripture is clear that commitment to another, especially those we make in marriage, are to be closely guarded. Love is not simply a feeling that we can set aside the moment a new feeling comes along. Commitment does not, however, excuse bad behaviour, for the promises of enduring love demand that I put the interests of my spouse higher than my own.
    God loves us with an enduring love. God’s commitment remains strong even when we choose to disregard him. This offers us a picture of what love means. Marriage, itself the chosen vehicle for expressing intimate commitment to another, is therefore identified by Paul with the relationship between Jesus and his Church. We are members of that wayward Church, regardless of any congregational affiliation we may or may not have. Therefore, as a spouse, we have a template for how we are to build our marriage and love each other.
    At one level, marriage is a state-recorded transaction. Hence the paperwork completed by the official registrar at any formal wedding. However, marriage is defined by God as the moment I leave, cleave and become one with another. For practical reasons the state certification may prove important, but the eternal reality of my commitment to my lover is declared by those three steps of leaving, cleaving or living together, and becoming one flesh. We are to choose carefully, for we may be married in God’s eyes, if not those of the state.
    QUESTION: If you are married, have you thought of giving thanks to God and restating your commitment to one another and to God?
    PRAYER: Thank you for showing me your commitment and true love.

    • 5 min
    Day 32 - Issue 31

    Day 32 - Issue 31

    Philippians 1:27 NLT
    'Above all, you must live as citizens of heaven, conducting yourselves in a manner worthy of the Good News about Christ. Then, whether I come and see you again or only hear about you, I will know that you are standing together with one spirit and one purpose, fighting together for the faith, which is the Good News.'
    A citizen is an inhabitant; it’s where we live and where we are known. The 18th-century Scottish economist, Adam Smith, created the moral component to a citizen’s behaviour in his book, The Theory of Moral Sentiments (Gutenberg Publishers). It suggested that while self-interest was the primary driver for human action, on occasion the welfare of another influenced someone’s behaviour. This was only for the “pleasure of seeing it”. I find this a depressing and dystopian view on social interaction and human development.
    When speaking of national citizenship, English, Scots, Welsh, Irish and many other nationalities may describe with warmth the characteristics that describe the elements of their identity. Heaven’s citizens may equally present a very positive nature of their citizenship.
    However, our instruction comes from the creator of all. God requires me to exercise hospitality to everyone. This moral imperative reveals my credentials as a citizen of heaven.
    It has a purpose in demonstrating the effectiveness of the citizen’s charter enshrined in scripture. It operates under the leadership of a benevolent dictator. It insists that those at the margins are treated with the greatest dignity and that everyone’s welfare is the responsibility of every citizen. It offers every citizen an opportunity to explore living this charter in a foreign land before journeying back home for an eternity where this charter ensures happiness for all such citizens. Living as a citizen of heaven means that I inhabit my heavenly home even while I live in a foreign land; it also presents me with a set of moral sentiments whereby the interests of ‘the other’ are placed ahead of my own. Sacrificial living was exactly what the founder of this heavenly kingdom demonstrated.
    QUESTION: How well are you doing, and where are the roadblocks in your behaviour as a citizen of heaven?
    PRAYER: Thank you for adopting me into your family and offering me citizenship of heaven.

    • 4 min
    Day 31 - Issue 31

    Day 31 - Issue 31

    Luke 10:5-6 NLT
    Whenever you enter someone’s home, first say, “May God’s peace be on this house.” If those who live there are peaceful, the blessing will stand; if they are not, the blessing will return to you.
    I remember the transfer of responsibility for the welfare of my parents being passed onto me. With a diagnosis of terminal cancer, my dad, a strong if silent individual, who had fought through the whole of the Second World War, including participating in three land invasions, mentally accepted that he would soon pass from mortality into eternity. He asked me to oversee my parents’ move from their family home in London to a flat in Portsmouth, the city where I lived. In the fraction of time it took for me to accept my father’s request, I felt the weight of that responsibility settle on my shoulders.
    It has taken far longer for me to acknowledge and then accept the responsibility of serving God’s kingdom objectives with my whole heart and life. I am to see all of life through eyes redeemed through God’s grace. My decisions are to be made in the light of eternity. I am to live in ways that demonstrate that “I no longer live, but Christ lives in me” (Galatians 2:20-21, NIV). So, I am required to practise hospitality. One part of that responsibility is to share the peace of Christ’s presence and rule with all those who I meet. I am to respect them and to pray for them. Such prayers are always for their well-being.
    For me this means that whenever anyone visits me, I seek to welcome them as I would welcome Jesus. If I visit someone, then I am to carry God’s peace into their home and pray for their good. I have learned from my interest in St Francis to adopt his greeting as my prayer. “[itals]Pax et Bonum[end itals],” he would say – peace and goodness be with you and your household: my simple understanding. I don’t use the Latin as a greeting, but I do pray both for my host.
    QUESTION: Do you want to be a channel of peace and goodness?
    PRAYER: May the peace of Christ go with me and rest on those places I visit this week.

    • 5 min

Customer Reviews

Kary BKK ,

Love this podcast!

I’ve been looking for a relatively short and meaningful morning devotional podcast.

Top Podcasts In Christianity

Listeners Also Subscribed To