23 episodes

Barack Obama is widely regarded as one of the greatest public speakers of all time. He is known for his eloquence, his ability to connect with his audience, and his use of powerful language and imagery to convey his message.Obama's speeches are often characterized by their clarity, their focus on substance, and their use of personal stories and anecdotes. He is also a master of the rhetorical device of repetition, which he uses to emphasize his key points and drive them home to his audience.Obama is also known for his ability to deliver his speeches in a way that is both engaging and informative. He uses a variety of vocal techniques, such as pauses, emphasis, and changes in tone, to keep his audience's attention. He also uses gestures and facial expressions to convey his emotions and make his speeches more personal.Here are some specific examples of Obama's strengths as a public speaker:
Clarity and focus on substance: Obama's speeches are always clear and concise, and they are always focused on substance. He avoids using jargon or technical language, and he always takes the time to explain complex issues in a way that is easy to understand.Use of personal stories and anecdotes: Obama often uses personal stories and anecdotes in his speeches to connect with his audience and to illustrate his points. This makes his speeches more relatable and engaging.Use of repetition: Obama is a master of the rhetorical device of repetition. He uses it to emphasize his key points and drive them home to his audience.Engaging and informative delivery: Obama delivers his speeches in a way that is both engaging and informative. He uses a variety of vocal techniques and gestures to keep his audience's attention and to convey his emotions.Some of Obama's most famous speeches include:
2008 Democratic National Convention acceptance speech: In this speech, Obama accepted the Democratic nomination for President of the United States. He delivered a powerful and inspiring speech that called for a new kind of politics based on hope and change.2009 inaugural address: In this speech, Obama was inaugurated as the 44th President of the United States. He spoke about the challenges facing the country and called for Americans to unite and work together to overcome them.2015 eulogy for Reverend Clementa Pinckney: In this eulogy, Obama spoke about the life and legacy of Reverend Clementa Pinckney, one of the nine victims of the Charleston church shooting. He delivered a moving and powerful speech that called for an end to gun violence and racial injustice.These are just a few examples of Barack Obama's many public speaking engagements. Throughout his career, Obama has used his voice to advocate for hope, change, and justice. He is a powerful and inspiring speaker who continues to make a difference in the world.

Barack Obama - Great Speeches Barack Obama Speeches

    • Government

Barack Obama is widely regarded as one of the greatest public speakers of all time. He is known for his eloquence, his ability to connect with his audience, and his use of powerful language and imagery to convey his message.Obama's speeches are often characterized by their clarity, their focus on substance, and their use of personal stories and anecdotes. He is also a master of the rhetorical device of repetition, which he uses to emphasize his key points and drive them home to his audience.Obama is also known for his ability to deliver his speeches in a way that is both engaging and informative. He uses a variety of vocal techniques, such as pauses, emphasis, and changes in tone, to keep his audience's attention. He also uses gestures and facial expressions to convey his emotions and make his speeches more personal.Here are some specific examples of Obama's strengths as a public speaker:
Clarity and focus on substance: Obama's speeches are always clear and concise, and they are always focused on substance. He avoids using jargon or technical language, and he always takes the time to explain complex issues in a way that is easy to understand.Use of personal stories and anecdotes: Obama often uses personal stories and anecdotes in his speeches to connect with his audience and to illustrate his points. This makes his speeches more relatable and engaging.Use of repetition: Obama is a master of the rhetorical device of repetition. He uses it to emphasize his key points and drive them home to his audience.Engaging and informative delivery: Obama delivers his speeches in a way that is both engaging and informative. He uses a variety of vocal techniques and gestures to keep his audience's attention and to convey his emotions.Some of Obama's most famous speeches include:
2008 Democratic National Convention acceptance speech: In this speech, Obama accepted the Democratic nomination for President of the United States. He delivered a powerful and inspiring speech that called for a new kind of politics based on hope and change.2009 inaugural address: In this speech, Obama was inaugurated as the 44th President of the United States. He spoke about the challenges facing the country and called for Americans to unite and work together to overcome them.2015 eulogy for Reverend Clementa Pinckney: In this eulogy, Obama spoke about the life and legacy of Reverend Clementa Pinckney, one of the nine victims of the Charleston church shooting. He delivered a moving and powerful speech that called for an end to gun violence and racial injustice.These are just a few examples of Barack Obama's many public speaking engagements. Throughout his career, Obama has used his voice to advocate for hope, change, and justice. He is a powerful and inspiring speaker who continues to make a difference in the world.

    Obama's Nominee Acceptance Speech at 2012 Democratic National Convention

    Obama's Nominee Acceptance Speech at 2012 Democratic National Convention

    Obama's Nominee Acceptance Speech at 2012 Democratic National Convention

    • 40 min
    President Barack Obama - Remarks on Sandy Hook Elementary Shootings December 16, 2012

    President Barack Obama - Remarks on Sandy Hook Elementary Shootings December 16, 2012

    Thank you, Governor. To all the families, first responders, to the community of Newtown, clergy, guests -- Scripture tells us: “…do not lose heart. Though outwardly we are wasting away…inwardly we are being renewed day by day. For our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs them all. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal. For we know that if the earthly tent we live in is destroyed, we have a building from God, an eternal house in heaven, not built by human hands.”We gather here in memory of twenty beautiful children and six remarkable adults. They lost their lives in a school that could have been any school; in a quiet town full of good and decent people that could be any town in America.Here in Newtown, I come to offer the love and prayers of a nation. I am very mindful that mere words cannot match the depths of your sorrow, nor can they heal your wounded hearts. I can only hope it helps for you to know that you’re not alone in your grief; that our world too has been torn apart; that all across this land of ours, we have wept with you, we’ve pulled our children tight. And you must know that whatever measure of comfort we can provide, we will provide; whatever portion of sadness that we can share with you to ease this heavy load, we will gladly bear it. Newtown -- you are not alone.As these difficult days have unfolded, you’ve also inspired us with stories of strength and resolve and sacrifice. We know that when danger arrived in the halls of Sandy Hook Elementary, the school’s staff did not flinch, they did not hesitate. Dawn Hochsprung and Mary Sherlach, Vicki Soto, Lauren Rousseau, Rachel Davino and Anne Marie Murphy -- they responded as we all hope we might respond in such terrifying circumstances -- with courage and with love, giving their lives to protect the children in their care.We know that there were other teachers who barricaded themselves inside classrooms, and kept steady through it all, and reassured their students by saying “wait for the good guys, they’re coming”; “show me your smile.” And we know that good guys came. The first responders who raced to the scene, helping to guide those in harm’s way to safety, and comfort those in need, holding at bay their own shock and trauma because they had a job to do, and others needed them more.And then there were the scenes of the schoolchildren, helping one another, holding each other, dutifully following instructions in the way that young children sometimes do; one child even trying to encourage a grown-up by saying, “I know karate. So it’s okay. I’ll lead the way out.” (Laughter.)As a community, you’ve inspired us, Newtown. In the face of indescribable violence, in the face of unconscionable evil, you’ve looked out for each other, and you’ve cared for one another, and you’ve loved one another. This is how Newtown will be remembered. And with time, and God’s grace, that love will see you through.But we, as a nation, we are left with some hard questions. Someone once described the joy and anxiety of parenthood as the equivalent of having your heart outside of your body all the time, walking around. With their very first cry, this most precious, vital part of ourselves -- our child -- is suddenly exposed to the world, to possible mishap or malice. And every parent knows there is nothing we will not do to shield our children from harm. And yet, we also know that with that child’s very first step, and each step after that, they are separating from us; that we won’t -- that we can’t always be there for them. They’ll suffer sickness and setbacks and broken hearts and disappointments. And we learn that our most important job is to give them what they need to become self-reliant and capable and resilient, ready to face the world without fear. And we know we can

    • 18 min
    President Barack Obama Speech - Clementa Pickney 2015 062 6

    President Barack Obama Speech - Clementa Pickney 2015 062 6

    President Barack Obama Speech - Clementa Pickney 2015 062 6

    • 37 min
    President Barack Obama - State of the Union Speech 2014 01 28

    President Barack Obama - State of the Union Speech 2014 01 28

    President Barack Obama - State of the Union Speech 2014 01 28

    • 1 hr 5 min
    President Barack Obama remarks Israeli People - 2013 03 21

    President Barack Obama remarks Israeli People - 2013 03 21

    President Barack Obama Israeli People - 2013 03 21

    • 49 min
    State of the Union - President Barack Obama 2015 01 20

    State of the Union - President Barack Obama 2015 01 20

    State of the Union Speech - President Barack Obama 2015 01 20

    • 1 hr

Top Podcasts In Government

Into Africa
CSIS | Center for Strategic and International Studies
Civics 101
NHPR
The Trade Guys
CSIS | Center for Strategic and International Studies
The Ugandan Podcast
The Ugandan Podcast
The Real Story
BBC World Service
HARDtalk
BBC World Service

You Might Also Like

Think Fast, Talk Smart: Communication Techniques
Stanford GSB
Michelle Obama: The Light Podcast
Higher Ground
TED Talks Daily
TED
Thinking in English
Thomas Wilkinson
Business Daily
BBC World Service
Real English Conversations Podcast - Learn to Speak & Understand Real English with Confidence!
Real English Conversations: Amy Whitney & Curtis Davies - English Podcast