10 episodes

Have you ever wondered about all the history we’ve missed? The amazing figures that are seemingly forgotten, incredible events passed over, or what a picture of true world history actually looks like? Or how history played out in the eyes of those who lived it and made it? The A.D. History Podcast explores the last two thousand years of world history, in an innovative new way. Join hosts Paul K. DiCostanzo and Patrick Foote as they examine the past two millennia, beginning in 1 AD, progressing forward ten years every episode until they reach the modern day. Within each ten-year installment, Paul and Patrick aim to share incredibly important, but often overlooked historic events and figures from around the world in prospective fashion; trying to see history through the eyes and in the world of those who lived it. By identifying these sometimes lesser known, but in no way less significant aspects of history, A.D. History seeks to identify the many disparate threads that weave the fuller, richer tapestry of history from around the world.

A.D. History Podcast Paul K. DiCostanzo, Patrick Foote

    • History
    • 4.8, 29 Ratings

Have you ever wondered about all the history we’ve missed? The amazing figures that are seemingly forgotten, incredible events passed over, or what a picture of true world history actually looks like? Or how history played out in the eyes of those who lived it and made it? The A.D. History Podcast explores the last two thousand years of world history, in an innovative new way. Join hosts Paul K. DiCostanzo and Patrick Foote as they examine the past two millennia, beginning in 1 AD, progressing forward ten years every episode until they reach the modern day. Within each ten-year installment, Paul and Patrick aim to share incredibly important, but often overlooked historic events and figures from around the world in prospective fashion; trying to see history through the eyes and in the world of those who lived it. By identifying these sometimes lesser known, but in no way less significant aspects of history, A.D. History seeks to identify the many disparate threads that weave the fuller, richer tapestry of history from around the world.

    Rome Eyes Ireland & Domitian the Despot | 81AD – 90AD Feat. J.J. McCullough

    Rome Eyes Ireland & Domitian the Despot | 81AD – 90AD Feat. J.J. McCullough

    For this episode of A.D. History, Paul and Patrick revisit Roman Britain. In so doing, Patrick examines potential Roman ambitions to cross the Irish Sea, as well as the waning ambitions of Rome to not conquer and occupy the area which encompasses modern day Scotland. Furthermore noted educational YouTube creator, contributor to the Washington Post and National Review J.J. McCullough joins this installment as a special guest.



    Rome, Ireland and Scotland

    Roman Britannia during the volatile “Year of the Four Emperors” and since saw more relative stability than many other provinces of the empire. With most local rebellion quelled south of the modern day Scottish border, the rest of the British isles underwent significant Romanization.





    In essence, much of the desired Roman framework for ruling was operating quite smoothly at this juncture. Indeed, Romanization is a key element to understanding the long term framework of Roman power itself.



    Romanization in Roman Britain

    Roman power was often predicated on the concept of soft power, best defined as a means of macro influence to other peoples by way of a given entities culture, ideas, and general philosophies of life.



    In Roman Britain, the empire saught to incorporate the people’s within its territory – namely the native ruling aristocrats – to pledge their loyalty to Rome in exchange for things like Roman citizenship, a cherished prize.





    In so accepting such an arrangement, those with Roman citizenship could be politically active – voting – in the Roman world. As well as being able to trade with other Romans, entering contracts, and enjoying legally recognized marriages.



    Not all who were subject to Roman power were citizens, and to enjoy that status was a major boon for those that possessed it. Though Rome was considered a more hard power undertaking across the Irish Sea.



    Rome Sizing Up Ireland

    Gnaeus Julius Agricola was Roman governor of Britannia, who is credited for the significant expansion of Rome’s territory in the British Isles. During his tenure, Agricola gave serious consideration to the Roman invasion of Ireland.





    Agricola, tempted by the possibility of taking Ireland, seriously considered crossing the Irish Sea with a unit of 5,000 legionnaires to conquer the emerald isles. Yet ultimately refrained from doing so, given the immense difficulties such an operation would require. In addition to seeing the arithmetic of the cost-benefit analysis in this situation.







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    Introducing the A.D. History Podcast



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    Caligula: Truly a Mad Emperor? & Roman Conquest of Britain 



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    Historical Jesus: What Do We Know? & Founding the Kushan Empire







    Domitian’s Despotism

    Domitian was the youngest son of Vespasian, and younger brother of Titus. Domitian served the pose as Emperor, and the last such member of the Flavian dynasty to do so.



    In this segment Paul explores how Domitian – a man never expected to become emperor – blew aside the vestiges of the republican facade in Rome, and transformed its political institutions into a bald-faced despotism. Indeed, it is during this time that many scholars mark the total and unambiguous end to Rome’s republic.



    Write to the A.D. History Podcast at adhistorypodcast@tgnreview.com

    • 1 hr 56 min
    Second Temple’s Destruction, Siege of Masada Fortress & Roman Colosseum Construction | 71AD – 80AD

    Second Temple’s Destruction, Siege of Masada Fortress & Roman Colosseum Construction | 71AD – 80AD

    In this most recent installment of the A.D. History Podcast, Paul and Patrick discuss the dramatic destruction by Roman forces of Jerusalem’s Second Temple in 70AD, as well as the Siege of Masada Fortress in 73AD. The Romans also conversely play a part in epic construction, namely of the Flavian Amphitheater, better known today as the world famous Roman Colosseum completed in 80AD. 

    Second Temple of Jerusalem Destruction

    In Judaism, the destruction of the Second Temple by Roman forces in 70AD is a seminal event in Jewish history. Under the command of the Roman general Titus, both the Second Temple and Jerusalem itself were sacked. Though not de jure, the event effectively signifies the beginning of the near 2,000 years long Jewish diaspora from the lands that were once the Israelite Kingdom.





    With the Temple’s destruction, it also inadvertently ushered in a structural change to Judaism overall. When the Temple was no more, the hereditary Priests that served many roles in Judaism of the time, began to see their importance and influence lessen. Specifically in losing their singular role for the sacrifice during Passover.





    Unlike many cut and dry descriptions of the process, the Priests influence and societal role did not evaporate overnight. Yet from 70AD, it began an extended process that lead to the rise of Rabbinical Judaism, which is the arrangement that exists to this day. 

    Siege of Masada Fortress

    The immense Siege of Masada fortress in 72AD, while not the final gasp of Jewish resistance against Roman rule, was the final act of the First Jewish-Roman War. The 767 Sicarri zealots led by Eleazar ben Ya’ir, we’re laid siege upon by the forces of Lucius Flavius Silva. Silva enjoyed an advantage of at least 10:1 between his Roman legion X Fretensis, and auxiliaries provided by local allies.



    Masada itself was originally a pair of palaces built by Herod the Great into the top of a mountain decades prior, which was further fortified in the 30’s AD. It served as ideal defensive infrastructure, especially when considering the treacherous “snake path” which gravely complicated the approach of any offensive.





    To solve this problem, the besieging Romans built their own earthworks on the shallowest approach of the mountain leading up to the Masada fortress. Taking many months to complete, the Romans created the path for their battering ram. After which when they penetrated the meters thick outer wall, causing the defenders to retreat into the aforementioned palace. At which time, all but seven women and children, committed suicide rather than die by the sword of the Romans.





    • Caligula: Truly a Mad Emperor? & Roman Conquest of Britain | 41AD – 50AD

    • Historical Jesus: What do we Know? & Founding the Kushan Empire | 31AD – 40AD

    • Murder of Germanicus Cold Case & Strabo’s the Geography | 21AD – 30AD



    Constructing the Roman Colosseum

    The construction of the Roman Colosseum in most respects is the product of earlier Roman disarray. During the late 60’s/early 70’s AD, the Roman political landscape was in great upheaval. Nero’s suicide creates a political crisis leading to the period known as the time of the four emperors. This culminates in Vespasian emerging as the Princeps, and founding the Flavian dynasty. Yet after several years of minor civil wars to arrive at this juncture, Vespasian sought to rehabilitate the Empire in the eyes of its citizens.

    • 1 hr 35 min
    Buddhism Arrives in China & Halley’s Comet in the First Jewish-Roman War | 61AD – 70AD

    Buddhism Arrives in China & Halley’s Comet in the First Jewish-Roman War | 61AD – 70AD

    In this newest installment of A.D. History, Paul and Patrick dig into the all import arrival of Buddhism in China, noted in official Han Dynasty record’s as occurring in 65AD. They also explore the unique role of Halley’s Comet in the First Jewish-Roman War occurring in Jerusalem during 66AD. 

    Buddhism & Han Chinese Culture

    Buddhism’s arrival in China circa 65AD is a seminal historic landmark in the development of Han Chinese culture over the last 2,000 years. Buddhism’s role in fusing with Confucianism and Taoism creates a uniquely Han Chinese belief system that exists to this day. Yet, what exactly is Buddhism?



    What is Buddhism?

    Buddhism since it’s inception in circa 500BC, has taken many distinct forms of which there are numerous sects – Zen Buddhism or Tibetan Buddhism, for example. Yet every sect of Buddhism derives initially from the experiences and teachings of the first Buddha, Gotama Sidhartha.





    Gotama Sidhartha was in all likelihood the son of elected ruling oligarchs, and born into the Shakya clan. Gotama’s exact place of birth is believed by historians to be located in small city-state in the northeast portion of the Indian subcontinent. Likely in close proximity to either modern Nepal or Tibet.



    Gotama’s story – as taught in Buddhism – begins with him born into a very sheltered court life, in which he wanted for nothing. As Gotama began reaching adulthood, he sought out answers to many question he knew were not possible to answer in that setting.



    Gotama departed his place of origins during what Buddhists call “the four sights.” The four sights in question include seeing the effects of old age, destitution, dearth, and ultimately coming into contact with an ascetic monk to begin Gotama‘a great journey.





    Once reaching the enlightenment he sought, Gotama laid down the major Buddhist tenants of the “Four Noble Truths” and the “Eightfold Path.” These tenants, as understood by Buddhists, layed the foundation for other Buddhists to themselves reach enlightenment. 



    How did Buddhism Arrive in China: The Legend

    The traditional story for how Buddhism ultimately took root in China directly involves the Han Chinese emperor, Ming of Han. As an extreme curious and learned monarch, Ming is said to have experienced a dream that he saw as a vision, where an unknown man composed entirely of gold with an aura around his head, went and sat down in the middle of Ming’s imperial court.





    When Ming went to question this figure, the unknown man levitated directly upwards in the sky, and flew off in a flash.



    Ming concurred with his imperial cohorts, where one mentioned in this west of China – there was a figure enshrined completely in gold – who was called the Buddha, was gaining in popularity. Ming acting upon this information, sent official emissaries to find teachers of this following, and bring them back to the imperial court. 



    How did Buddhism Really Arrive in China?

    Most scholars today, looking beyond the aforementioned long taught story, believe Buddhism first started diffusing into China’s then western regions by way of the Silk Road. Some scholars reckon that the origin of Buddhism in this case was directly emanating from the Kushan Empire, which contained the major arteries of Silk Road trading routes at the time. In doing so, it slowly began a major two millennia long cultural fusion in China.





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    Murder of Germanicus Cold Case & Strabo’s the Geography | 21AD – 30AD



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    The Death of Wang Mang, Caeser Augustus & the Roman Republic | 11AD –...

    • 1 hr 33 min
    Boudicca Resists Rome & The Aeolipile: The Unknown FIRST Steam Engine | 51AD - 60AD

    Boudicca Resists Rome & The Aeolipile: The Unknown FIRST Steam Engine | 51AD - 60AD

    The Celtic Iceni tribe’s resistance lead by Queen Boudicca against Roman dominance in ancient Britannia remains a founding pillar for modern British pride. The collaboration of Cartimandua, Queen of the Brigantes is far less known. Even less known is Hero of Alexandria’s inventing the Aeolipile, a proof of concept that is believed to be civilization’s first known steam engine.

    Paul and Patrick explore the very different courses of action taken in ancient Britain regarding Roman domination. Foremost contrasting the immense fight to repel Roman occupation by Boudicca, against the outright cooperation and aid provided by Cartimandua. As well as looking at the Aeolipile, debating whether this overlooked concept at the time, under different circumstances, could have jump started the industrial revolution centuries before it actually did.



    Cartimandua: A Case Study in Collaboration

    Throughout history, there have been many facts in which a leader or peoples manage outright occupation by a foreign power. There are few examples as demonstrative in their contrast as that of Queen Boudicca of the Iceni, and Queen Cartimandua of the Brigantes. Theirs is a story that bares out many times in recorded history.



    Cartimandua herself proves an interesting political case study, as her rule of the Brigantes was outright and total – given that she did not derive power from a king concurrently sitting on the throne with her. Cartimandua inherited the Brigantes throne from her late father, in circa 43AD. The Brigantes realm itself encompassed modern day Yorkshire, but is believed to have extended as far as modern Liverpool and Newcastle.



    Cartimandua’s appeasement and collaboration with Roman rule most significantly began in 51AD, when she turned over to Roman authority King Caratacus of the Catuvellauni tribe who had fled into her protection after defeat at the hands of Roman legions.





    Cartimandua’s decision created significant animosity in her own people against her rule. Furthermore after leaving her husband Venutius for his armor bearer, Venutius acting upon his person scorn and her collaboration mustered a significant rebellion against Rome – a rebellion only temporarily quelled by Cartimandua due to requesting Roman military assistance.

    Venutius managed to survive this defeat, and in 69AD rose up again to successfully depose Cartimandua when Roman assistance was unavailable due to other ongoing conflicts in the empire.



    Boudicca: A Case Study in Resistance

    Queen Boudicca of the Iceni undertook a very different course of action with the Romans, strongly contrasting that of Cartimandua. The Iceni were a fellow Celtic tribes who’s domain centered in East Anglia. The Iceni under her husband King Prasutagus initially formed a pact with the Romans, making the Iceni a client kingdom.





    Prasutagus in his death in 61AD, saw the Romans betray the aforementioned pact – occupying the Iceni realm over Boudicca’s protest. Boudicca and her daughter were forcibly taken into Roman custody, where they were brutally tortured. Upon Boudicca’s release, she raised an army of an estimated 200,000 troops. Before her eventual defeat and suicide, Boudicca razed the Roman provincial capital in modern Colchester, and Londinium (London) itself.







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    Caligula: Truly a Mad Emperor? & Roman Conquest of Britain | 41AD – 50AD



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    Historical Jesus: What Do We Know? & Founding the Kushan Empire | 31AD – 40AD



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    • 1 hr 36 min
    Caligula: Truly a Mad Emperor? & Roman Conquest of Britain | 41AD – 50AD

    Caligula: Truly a Mad Emperor? & Roman Conquest of Britain | 41AD – 50AD

    In this episode, Paul and Patrick are excited to introduce A.D. History’s first special guest sporting the third chair, Kristen E. Strubberg. Kristen is TGNR’s Found and Editor-in-Chief, as well as a professional medical clinical researcher with a background in Neuroscience. Kristen will help provide a clearer possible view into Emperor Caligula’s long suspected struggle with mental illness. Patrick will also dive deep into another major piece of world history, exploring Emperor Claudius’s conquest of ancient Britain in 43AD/44AD.

    Caligula: A Modern Political Psychological Profile

    Emperor Caligula, born Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus Germanicus in 12AD, was one of nine children of the Roman folk hero Germanicus and his wife Agrippina. During his earliest years, Caligula spent time with his parents who were stationed on the Rhine, when his father Germanicus was appointed commander of all Roman legions stationed on the Germania frontier.



    The name “Caligula” was in fact a nickname given to him at this time as the young lad, after his mother Agrippina had the encampment’s tailor outfit him in a legionaries uniform. Caligae are the famed battle sandals worn by Roman legions, and his nickname – Caligula – is translated from Latin to English as “bootykins” or “little boots.” Both he and his nickname are testament to his being viewed by the stationed legions as an unofficial mascot. This nickname “Caligula,” which he most certainly did not answer to as an adult, is of ominous contrast when compared to his notoriously unpredictable and violent nature upon assuming power.

    Caligula the Unknown?

    Caligula is one of the most infamous rulers in human history, best known for his violent whims, mercurial disposition and immense self aggrandizement . Yet outside of that, Caligula is a highly fleeting figure for historians, who know so little about him.

    Following Caligula’s assassination by the Praetorian Guard in 41AD, Caligula’s enemies took extensive measures to try and erase him from their history. For all intents and purposes, his enemies did a very good job of doing just that. In fact, the greatest amount of information about Caligula known to historians are the events surrounding his assassination.

    Caligula & His Long Suspected Mental Illness

    Caligula is believed by many to have suffered from some form of mental illness, given his penchant for wildly unpredictable behavior. With so little good historical information available about Caligula, specifically during his time as Emperor, it is difficult to provide sufficient specifics about him in general. However, this lack of good information is in some ways very similar to the lack of good information regarding modern rulers – a situation not at all dissimilar in some respects to a figure like Kim Jong Un.



    This episode attempts building a modern political psychological profile as they’re constructed for modern world leaders. In using the approach of Dr. Jerrold Post, a foremost political psychology expert known best for creating said profiles for the U.S. State Department and intelligence arms, coupled with Kristen’s unique insight – despite the relative dearth of information – she helps guide creating a similar understanding of Caligula 2,000 years later.

    Who is Kristen E. Strubberg?

    Kristen E. Strubberg is TGNR’s Founder and Editor-in-Chief. Kristen initially founded TGNR in late 2013, seeking to create a news source that reported positive news of significant substance. In addition to providing expert contribution of various individuals in numerous subjects, through the medium of the highest quality printed word.

    • 1 hr 20 min
    Historical Jesus: What Do We Know? & Founding the Kushan Empire | 31AD – 40AD

    Historical Jesus: What Do We Know? & Founding the Kushan Empire | 31AD – 40AD

    In this most recent addition of A.D. History, Paul K. DiCostanzo and Patrick Foote dive into the study of historical Jesus regarding his adult life, public ministry and crucifixion. Paul and Patrick also break ground of the lesser known Kushan Empire, the Central Asian power that served as dual gatekeeper and buffer state for both the ancient Far East and West. 

    What do historians know about the life of Jesus of Nazareth?

    In the study of history, Jesus of Nazareth is a figure of great interest. Yet the study of his life through the historian’s lens is very different than that of a theologian or religious studies scholar, however none are mutually exclusive to the others – sharing some similarities.





    In this segment Paul and Patrick seek to explore various aspects of Jesus in regards to history, how he would have been viewed at that juncture, and where these events fit in the bigger picture. 

    Most credible scholars relating to the study about Jesus of Nazareth as a historical figure concur on a few key points regarding the events of his lifetime. Foremost, historians believe he was born under unknown circumstances between 1BC and 4AD. Moreover, Jesus was also a single figure, raised in the Jewish tradition, likely spoke in part several common languages used in 1st Century Roman Palestine such as ancient Aramaic.



    Jesus’ well known movement in the form of a public ministry, lasted three years occurring between 28AD and 33AD. Furthermore Jesus was sentenced to death under Roman authority by Pontius Pilate, and died by crucifixion on-or-near Passover in Jerusalem in his early 30’s.



    Historians aside from these aforementioned points enjoy far less certainty or consensus about the details of Jesus of Nazareth’s life. Titus Flavius Josephus and Roman historian Tacitus serve as the best early, non-Christian sources making unambiguous and meaningful reference to Jesus’ life, his following during his life, and the growth of Christianity after his death. 

    Josephus, a former Roman slave and hellenized Jew, makes first mention of Jesus’ life and fate in his noted history of Judaism leading to the first century in Antiquities of the Jews, believed by scholars to be written in the mid 90’s AD.



    Tacitus in writing The Annals during the 120’s AD, also mentions Jesus in his recounting of Emperor Nero using Roman Christians as scapegoats, wrongly blaming and subsequently torturing them for the famous great fire of Rome in 64AD.

    Paul and Patrick also explore various contentious archeological findings that might shed further light on major figures depicted prominently within the four gospels of the Christian New Testament; such as the Roman governor of First Century Roman Palestine, Pontius Pilate. As well as Joseph ben Caiaphas, the head of the Sanhedrin – a body tasked with matters pertaining to governing the Jews on issues deemed within their scope of local autonomy by Rome.



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    The World of Baby Jesus & Rise of Wang Mang | 1AD – 10AD



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    The Death of Wang Mang, Emperor Augustus and the Roman Republic | 11AD – 20AD



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    The Forgotten Declaration of Independence Signers Who Lost Everything for Signing







    Kushan Empire: The Gatekeeper for the Eastern and Western Worlds

    In the ancient world of this period and region, history is often dominated by the Roman and Han Chinese juggernauts. Yet these two powers never shared a common border, and their spheres of influence end on the periphery of Central Asia.

    • 1 hr 53 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
29 Ratings

29 Ratings

Patriot2990 ,

Really Unique Offering

This is my new podcast for 2020!

I’ve listened to a fair number of podcasts with a focus on history and I think AD History brings a fresh perspective, not only on its format of looking at each decade but by highlighting the lesser known topics in the period.

The hosts, Paul and Patrick, research their topics well and also seem to bring a certain humor to it as well which is refreshing. If you’re a history geek, this podcast hits the sweet spot.

I’m looking forward to how this podcast progresses as I haven’t found anything that brings this kind of unique offering.

allijuli ,

Great show!!

Completely enjoyed listening. Learned many things and can’t wait for the next episode. On the edge of seat excited!!

Trudgeman ,

High hopes but disappoints - Deleted comment

Wow really you delete my comment because of one star? No wonder you have a 5.0 rating . For those that care here is my original review.

I had really high hopes for this podcast and was really excited about the format. Unfortunately, the hosts don’t make it work. Paul seems to pontificate and sounds pretentious. He must think using fancy vocabulary words leads to people thinking he know what is talking about. He goes in way too many tangents that don’t discuss the topic at hand. The podcasts lack any narrative or storytelling. Seems like the hosts are doing a school assignment and just are covering their bullet points when talking about the subject matter. Having more depth on the subject would be better that their banter back and forth. Also mostly just focused on the western world except for the one half show that they talked about China. There is more happening at that time in the world besides the Roman Empire!

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