100 episodes

The Ad Navseam podcast, where Classical gourmands can finally get their fill. Join hosts Dr. David Noe and Dr. Jeff Winkle for a lively discussion of Greco-Roman civilization stretching from the Minoans and Mycenaeans, through the Renaissance, and right down to the present.

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    • Education
    • 4.9 • 73 Ratings

The Ad Navseam podcast, where Classical gourmands can finally get their fill. Join hosts Dr. David Noe and Dr. Jeff Winkle for a lively discussion of Greco-Roman civilization stretching from the Minoans and Mycenaeans, through the Renaissance, and right down to the present.

    A Night to Dismember: The Tragedy of Nisus and Euryalus in Aeneid IX (Part 1)

    A Night to Dismember: The Tragedy of Nisus and Euryalus in Aeneid IX (Part 1)

    "Who drives us to outrageous action? Is it some god, or does each man make of his own desire a god, which then drives him furiously to a violent end"? This is the question we consider this week as we turn to the final quarter of the epic (books 9-12). And we are treated to two surprising events: first, how the ships of the Trojans are transformed into mermaids, shocking Turnus and his gathered Rutulians. Juno is up to her old tricks, and sends along Iris the messenger to tell him not to worry, the Trojans will be trapped in Italy where they can be easy prey for the indigenous hero and his assorted forces. Aeneas is off-scene, still wandering through the regions of Arcadia, securing alliances with Evander and company. The second episode is the midnight raid of Nisus and Euryalus. In a nod to – or perhaps improvement upon – Homer's Iliad 10 and the gruesome death of Dolon at the hands of Odysseus and Diomedes, Vergil here tells his own tragic story of two friends overtaken by greed and a desire for bloodlust. It's not all grim, however. Along the way you can spot silos of Pringles™, the grit of Fig Newtons™, a brief excursion to the admittedly grim Battle of the Little Big Horn, and some Uncrustables™. One might say that mixing the serious with the silly has become Jeff and Dave's ™. So tune in!  

    • 1 hr 10 min
    Signed, Shield, Delivered: Aeneas becomes Achilles in Aeneid Book VIII, Part 2 (Ad Navseam Episode 109)

    Signed, Shield, Delivered: Aeneas becomes Achilles in Aeneid Book VIII, Part 2 (Ad Navseam Episode 109)

    This week the guys wrap up Book VIII of Vergil's epic by discussing Aeneas' amazing shield. Wrought by the ignipotens fire-forger Vulcan at the lascivious behest of his sometime bride Venus, the shield is an ekphrasis of Roman history. But how does it compare to its predecessor, that of Achilles from Iliad XVIII? Is it, in Jeff's words, "too on the nose"? Or are there deeper meanings beneath the oxhide? And how does Aeneas compare to Odysseus in terms of plausible humanity? Should he tell some lies or bump some fists to seem more real? Come along for these questions and more — complete with tedious detours through Dante, supines, album covers, early Christian apologists, and Disney's Beauty and the Beast™! Did they leave out anything from this one? 

    • 1 hr 6 min
    Et in Arcadia Ego? Evander and Cacus in Vergil’s Aeneid Book VIII, Part 1 (Ad Navseam, Episode 108)

    Et in Arcadia Ego? Evander and Cacus in Vergil’s Aeneid Book VIII, Part 1 (Ad Navseam, Episode 108)

    This week Jeff and Dave launch into the fascinating, often misunderstood world of Rome way, way back before there were Romans. As Aeneas readies for battle in the idyllic landscape, he needs some allies. So it's off a-paddlin' to Arcadia, where the rustic Greek king Evander and his momentous son Pallas make ready allies. While enjoying some old-fashioned hospitality, Evander tells our hero the long, digressive backstory of Greece's mightiest avenger: Hercules. On the way back from rustlin' Spanish cattle, Hercules got rustled himself by the smoke-belching Cacus. This troglodytic monster must be killed. But what does this mean for the epic as a whole and for Vergil's view of the Pax Augusta? Well to find out, warm up your jerri-can of coffee, chill your bucket of Diet Coke, and tuck in for a classical repast past its prime not at all.

    • 1 hr 15 min
    The Census of Quirinius in the Gospel of Luke, Chapter 2 (Ad Navseam, Episode 107)

    The Census of Quirinius in the Gospel of Luke, Chapter 2 (Ad Navseam, Episode 107)

    In this Christmas-themed episode Jeff and Dave take a break from the Aeneid to look at Luke's Gospel, chapter 2:1-5, and the puzzling census of Quirinius. Drawing from half a dozen scholarly articles on the subject, we try to puzzle out the four major objections to Luke's reliability as a historian on the topic of the census:
    “1. Apart from the gospel, history knows nothing of a general Imperial census in the time of Augustus.2. There could have been no Roman census in Palestine during the time of Herod the Great, a rex socius.3. Such a census at such a time could not have been carried out by Quirinius, for he was not governor in Syria then, nor till 10 years later, when he did make a census which gave rise to a revolt under Judas of Galilee. 4. Under a Roman census it would not have been necessary for Joseph to go to Bethlehem, or for Mary to accompany him.” - Alexander Balmain Bruce, D.D. (from Epxositor's Greek New Testament, W. Robertson Nicoll, 1897; p. 470)Can each of these objections be met? Was Publius Sulpicius Quirinius gov. of Syria twice, before the death of Herod the Great and again in 6-7 A.D. for the census mentioned in Acts 5? What about inscriptional evidence? Is Luke reliable as a historian?
    You won't want to miss this thorough look at the subject, complete with some excellent intro. and outro. music generously provided by guitar wizard extraordinaire Jeff Scheetz.

    • 1 hr 28 min
    The First Time Ever I Saw Your Faces: Janus and Camilla in Aeneid Book VII, Part 3 (Ad Navseam, Episode 106)

    The First Time Ever I Saw Your Faces: Janus and Camilla in Aeneid Book VII, Part 3 (Ad Navseam, Episode 106)

    The guys wrap up their look at Book 7 this week but not before transgressing a few more liminal spaces. When Latinus throws up his hands at the storm gathering around him and his neighbors, it is up to Juno herself to descend and open the Gates of War. While this is the moment in the epic where the Iliadic violence of the second half is officially unleashed, these Gates also point to a Roman reality—the Temple of Janus and the Gates of War in the Roman Forum. A (worthy, we think) digression takes us into the history of these gates and this strange, two-faced deity. We end with a breakdown of Turnus’ puzzling fashion choices on the battlefield, and a glimpse at the extraordinary swift-footed, wheat-sprinting, water-skipping warrioress, Camilla.  Keep an eye on this gal.

    • 1 hr 4 min
    The Fury’s Still Out on this One: Allecto in Aeneid Book VII, Part 2 (Ad Navseam, Episode 105)

    The Fury’s Still Out on this One: Allecto in Aeneid Book VII, Part 2 (Ad Navseam, Episode 105)

    This week the guys move (nearer) to the end of Book VII and examine the role of that frightful, hair raising, blood-curdilng sister of Tisiphone and Megaera known as Allecto. Juno -- who knows she's lost but doesn't like being a one-trick villainess -- unleashes hell's wrath on Aeneas' nascent nuptial notions. Allecto's conjured up and down she goes into Amata to spread havoc across the Italian landscape. Along the way we investigate such questions as: is Ascanius' aristeia just riding his pony in the Trojan Games? Can such an innocuous, apparently inconsequential accident like killing a pet albino stag really lead, Gavrilo Princip style, to world war? Where exactly is Ampsanctus? And why doesn't Jeff know who Glenn Hughes is? So pull on your deep purple jumper, your sweats by Vanquished or Loser, and digress for success!

    • 1 hr 4 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
73 Ratings

73 Ratings

Mango of the rainwings ,

13 years old and I love it

Mom listens to this a lot and I enjoyed it so much I started listening on my own.(My favorite is Ghosts to Show ya)

Wonderpuppy ,

Entertaining and Educational

I'm a Baby Boomer who took a few years of Latin forty years ago, but I have always retained a love for the language. My dream would be to become fluent, but given other priorities in my life, that's not likely to happen. In the mean time, I dabble in Latin a bit and satisfy my desire to learn more of it via this fabulous podcast. The hosts are clearly knowlegeable and obviously love the Latin language. I look forward to each new episode!

Anth0711 ,

More content, less banter

An enjoyable and informative podcast for those who have an interest in Classics. The hosts are engaging and friendly and present their analyses in a very user-friendly manner.

My only concern is that at times the never-ending banter distracts from the material presented becomes tiresome if not tedious.

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